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Take   /teɪk/   Listen
Take

verb
(past took; past part. taken; pres. part. taking)
1.
Carry out.  "Take steps" , "Take vengeance"
2.
Require (time or space).  Synonyms: occupy, use up.  "This event occupied a very short time"
3.
Take somebody somewhere.  Synonyms: conduct, direct, guide, lead.  "Can you take me to the main entrance?" , "He conducted us to the palace"
4.
Get into one's hands, take physically.  Synonym: get hold of.  "Can you take this bag, please"
5.
Take on a certain form, attribute, or aspect.  Synonyms: acquire, adopt, assume, take on.  "The story took a new turn" , "He adopted an air of superiority" , "She assumed strange manners" , "The gods assume human or animal form in these fables"
6.
Interpret something in a certain way; convey a particular meaning or impression.  Synonym: read.  "How should I take this message?" , "You can't take credit for this!"
7.
Take something or somebody with oneself somewhere.  Synonyms: bring, convey.  "Take these letters to the boss" , "This brings me to the main point"
8.
Take into one's possession.  "I'll take three salmon steaks"
9.
Travel or go by means of a certain kind of transportation, or a certain route.  "She takes Route 1 to Newark"
10.
Pick out, select, or choose from a number of alternatives.  Synonyms: choose, pick out, select.  "Choose a good husband for your daughter" , "She selected a pair of shoes from among the dozen the salesgirl had shown her"
11.
Receive willingly something given or offered.  Synonyms: accept, have.  "I won't have this dog in my house!" , "Please accept my present"
12.
Assume, as of positions or roles.  Synonyms: fill, occupy.  "He occupies the position of manager" , "The young prince will soon occupy the throne"
13.
Take into consideration for exemplifying purposes.  Synonyms: consider, deal, look at.  "Consider the following case"
14.
Require as useful, just, or proper.  Synonyms: ask, call for, demand, involve, necessitate, need, postulate, require.  "Success usually requires hard work" , "This job asks a lot of patience and skill" , "This position demands a lot of personal sacrifice" , "This dinner calls for a spectacular dessert" , "This intervention does not postulate a patient's consent"
15.
Experience or feel or submit to.  "Take the plunge"
16.
Make a film or photograph of something.  Synonyms: film, shoot.  "Shoot a movie"
17.
Remove something concrete, as by lifting, pushing, or taking off, or remove something abstract.  Synonyms: remove, take away, withdraw.  "Remove a wrapper" , "Remove the dirty dishes from the table" , "Take the gun from your pocket" , "This machine withdraws heat from the environment"
18.
Serve oneself to, or consume regularly.  Synonyms: consume, have, ingest, take in.  "I don't take sugar in my coffee"
19.
Accept or undergo, often unwillingly.  Synonym: submit.
20.
Make use of or accept for some purpose.  Synonym: accept.  "Take an opportunity"
21.
Take by force.  "The army took the fort on the hill"
22.
Occupy or take on.  Synonyms: assume, strike, take up.  "She took her seat on the stage" , "We took our seats in the orchestra" , "She took up her position behind the tree" , "Strike a pose"
23.
Admit into a group or community.  Synonyms: accept, admit, take on.  "We'll have to vote on whether or not to admit a new member"
24.
Ascertain or determine by measuring, computing or take a reading from a dial.  "A reading was taken of the earth's tremors"
25.
Be a student of a certain subject.  Synonyms: learn, read, study.
26.
Take as an undesirable consequence of some event or state of affairs.  Synonyms: claim, exact.  "The hard work took its toll on her"
27.
Head into a specified direction.  Synonym: make.  "We made for the mountains"
28.
Point or cause to go (blows, weapons, or objects such as photographic equipment) towards.  Synonyms: aim, direct, take aim, train.  "He trained his gun on the burglar" , "Don't train your camera on the women" , "Take a swipe at one's opponent"
29.
Be seized or affected in a specified way.  "Be taken drunk"
30.
Have with oneself; have on one's person.  Synonyms: carry, pack.  "I always carry money" , "She packs a gun when she goes into the mountains"
31.
Engage for service under a term of contract.  Synonyms: charter, engage, hire, lease, rent.  "Let's rent a car" , "Shall we take a guide in Rome?"
32.
Receive or obtain regularly.  Synonyms: subscribe, subscribe to.
33.
Buy, select.
34.
To get into a position of having, e.g., safety, comfort.
35.
Have sex with; archaic use.  Synonym: have.
36.
Lay claim to; as of an idea.  Synonym: claim.
37.
Be designed to hold or take.  Synonym: accept.
38.
Be capable of holding or containing.  Synonyms: contain, hold.  "The flask holds one gallon"
39.
Develop a habit.
40.
Proceed along in a vehicle.  Synonym: drive.
41.
Obtain by winning.  "He took first prize"
42.
Be stricken by an illness, fall victim to an illness.  Synonyms: contract, get.  "She came down with pneumonia" , "She took a chill"



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"Take" Quotes from Famous Books



... II dynasty, while they register only five. The monuments, indeed, show us that Egypt in the past obeyed princes whom her annalists were unable to classify: for instance, they associated with Sondi a Pirsenu, who is not mentioned in the annals. We must, therefore, take the record of all this opening period of history for what it is—namely, a system invented at a much later date, by means of various artifices and combinations—to be partially accepted in default of a better, but without, according to it, that excessive confidence ...
— The Great Events by Famous Historians, Vol. 1 • Various

... take my hat off," answered Hartog. "Marco Polo, the first and greatest navigator in the world's history. Where he could go ...
— Adventures in Southern Seas - A Tale of the Sixteenth Century • George Forbes

... far more than they, their native dispositions and their circumstances, and, through these, their action; which is so vast and complex that they can scarcely at all understand it or control its workings; and which has a nature so definite and fixed that whatever changes take place in it produce other changes inevitably and without regard to men's desires and regrets. And whether this system or order is best called by the name of fate or no,[12] it can hardly be denied that it does appear as the ultimate power in the tragic world, and that it has such ...
— Shakespearean Tragedy - Lectures on Hamlet, Othello, King Lear, Macbeth • A. C. Bradley

... gold, and I pounded him, and murdered him, and put him in chains. He hates me. What he shays can't be true. [He secretly hands Sthavaraka a bracelet, and whispers.] Sthavaraka, my little shon, my shlave, take thish and shay ...
— The Little Clay Cart - Mrcchakatika • (Attributed To) King Shudraka

... fiend! But now for the barbs; thou must make them thyself, man. Here are my razors —the best of steel; here, and make the barbs sharp as the needle-sleet of the Icy Sea. For a moment, the old blacksmith eyed the razors as though he would fain not use them. Take them, man, I have no need for them; for I now neither shave, sup, nor pray till —but here —to work! Fashioned at last into an arrowy shape, and welded by Perth to the shank, the steel soon pointed the end of the iron; and as the blacksmith was ...
— Moby-Dick • Melville

... moment; and I don't think his intellects were even yet quite clear enough to take it all in at once. But at last he did comprehend it, and when he did, he just uttered a loud cry of agony, and then turned his back on her without ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 17, No. 101, March, 1866 • Various

... nothing but a black, wicked lie. Don't cry so. There isn't a word of truth about it. They were only ragging you. Oh, don't take it so hard! I'll settle ...
— For the Sake of the School • Angela Brazil

... Master of your House, and may command; that you are heartily glad to see me at Cadiz, and that you desire I wou'd resolve upon a Week's stay, or so; that you'll spare nothing for my entertainment: why, I know all this, and therefore pray take my word, good Father-in-Law, without any ...
— The Works of Aphra Behn, Vol. III • Aphra Behn

... also the last French painter of whom we shall speak, as we do not propose to take up the excellent artists of our own day, who would require a ...
— A History of Art for Beginners and Students: Painting, Sculpture, Architecture - Painting • Clara Erskine Clement

... of resolutlon still on her little old wrinkled face. She killed a hen and dressed and baked it She fried up a pan of doughnuts and made a cake. She was engaged on the doughnuts when a neighbor came in, one of those women who take it as a personal affront when anyone in the neighborhood does anything without asking their advice. She was fat, and could talk a man blind in three minutes by ...
— Main-Travelled Roads • Hamlin Garland

... that daring person how ill he has chosen a market for his deference. If Touchwood's behaviour affects you very closely you had better break your leg in the course of the day: his bad temper will then vanish at once; he will take a painful journey on your behalf; he will sit up with you night after night; he will do all the work of your department so as to save you from any loss in consequence of your accident; he will be even uniformly tender to you till you are well on your legs again, ...
— Impressions of Theophrastus Such • George Eliot

... to take her in his arms and carry her up the stairway—it seemed the thing most worth doing in all the world—but he could only lean against the desk and see them go slowly stair ...
— The Spirit of Sweetwater • Hamlin Garland

... in his territory and said to himself, "My, but I ought to be able to sell them a mail-order cure." Forthwith he sits down and writes a course—it isn't necessary to have anything in it at all. Often these men do not even take the trouble to consult reliable books on the subject. They do not profess to know anything about stammering or stuttering, their cause or their cure. They simply sit down and write—and when they have it written, they send it to the printer, have it printed and then split these ...
— Stammering, Its Cause and Cure • Benjamin Nathaniel Bogue

... ex-Cabinet Minister of Roumania, that "towards the mid-August 1914, when the treaty was concluded which bound Bulgaria to Germany, the Roumanian Minister in Berlin, M. Beldiman, had cognizance of this treaty and apprised the Roumanian Government of the fact."[55] M. Take Jonescu, the illustrious Roumanian statesman, has assigned a different date to the conclusion of the agreement, but confirmed the fact of its existence in the course of a conversation which has also been made public.[2] He stated that the King of Bulgaria, "who is swayed more by personal rancour ...
— England and Germany • Emile Joseph Dillon

... do you more hurt at court, than ten men of merit can do you good. Fools, and low people, are always jealous of their dignity, and never forget nor forgive what they reckon a slight: on the other hand, they take civility and a little attention as a favor; remember, and acknowledge it: this, in my mind, is buying them cheap; and therefore they are worth buying. The prince himself, who is rarely the shining genius of his court, esteems you only ...
— The PG Edition of Chesterfield's Letters to His Son • The Earl of Chesterfield

... from her astonishment, helped Rodolphe to rise, and said a few words to Gina, whose eyes filled with tears. The two girls made him sit down on a bench and take off his coat, his waistcoat and cravat. Then Gina opened his shirt and sucked the wound strongly. Francesca, who had left them, returned with a large piece of sticking-plaster, which ...
— Albert Savarus • Honore de Balzac

... no dung nor shepe to compost nor dung his land withall. Then let the husband take his ploughe, and cast al such landes three or four tymes togider, and make theyr rigge theyr as ye raine was before.... And so shel he finde new moulde, that was not sene in an hundred yeres before, the which must nedes gyue more corne ...
— The Enclosures in England - An Economic Reconstruction • Harriett Bradley

... "I warrant that those are their foot-soldiers we fought against to-day, who would not walk any further. If you feel disposed we will go and take them. The moon is bright to-night, let us feed our horses and at about three or four o'clock we will go ...
— Bayard: The Good Knight Without Fear And Without Reproach • Christopher Hare

... bateau-men, Starke's rangers; a few friendly Indians—but the great Johnson was hurrying up with more, maybe with five hundred; in all fifteen thousand men and over. Never had America seen such an armament; and it went to take a ...
— Fort Amity • Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch

... mistaken notion that after all it is their own fault, or at least the fault of nature. They ought (it is fancied) to have been married: or at least they ought to have been good-looking enough and clever enough to be married. They are the exceptions, and for exceptions we cannot legislate. We must take care of the average article, and let the refuse take care of itself. I have put plainly, it may be somewhat coarsely, a belief which I believe many men hold, though they are too manly to express it. But the belief itself is false. It is false even of the lower classes. Among them, the cleverest, ...
— Women and Politics • Charles Kingsley

... another, the horses were brought across the yard to the door of the house. Mr. Duff led by the halter his favourite Snowball, who was a good deal excited, plunging and rearing so that it was all he could do to hold him. He had ordered the men to take the others first, thinking he would follow more quietly. But the moment Snowball heard the first thundering of hoofs on the stair, he went out of his senses with terror, broke from his master, and went plunging back to the stable. Duff darted after him, but was only in time to see him rush from ...
— Sir Gibbie • George MacDonald

... Rollo; "we will turn off into any of these streets, and perhaps we shall come upon the hotel. We will take the streets that look most like it, and at any rate, we shall have a good ride, and see the city ...
— Rollo in Rome • Jacob Abbott

... a simple organization of society prevailed, the school was not called upon to take up the practical work; but now society has become so complex that the use of practical activity is absolutely essential. Society to-day makes a greater demand than ever before upon each and all of its members for special skill and knowledge, as well as for ...
— The Tree-Dwellers • Katharine Elizabeth Dopp

... were mixed. His pride in the colt had been pushing him toward such a trial ever since he had heard Fenner speak of Oro. In addition, as the owner of a noted horse, he would take a place in this community, establish his identity as Drew Kirby. And in some way he could not define, this put him, at least in his own mind, on an equal ...
— Rebel Spurs • Andre Norton

... enough. I'd make a quick guess and say that we've got less than two hours to either shut that pile down or relieve the pressure. And if she's tipped, the time in getting it back up and checking out damage on the pump system is going to take too long and it might not be repairable. The best bet is to ...
— The Thirst Quenchers • Rick Raphael

... and myrtles and white satin ribbon covered my bed, to tie up a bouquet for a bride, very well wrapped up in my labada. You don't know what a labada is: Harriet will tell you. This nosegay was to be presented to the bride by little Mary, as Rosa was asked to the wedding, and was to take Mary with her. But who is the bride? you will ask, and ask you may; but you will not be a bit the wiser when I tell you—Miss Thompson. Now your heads go to Clonfin, or to Thompsons near Dublin, or in the County ...
— The Life and Letters of Maria Edgeworth, Vol. 2 • Maria Edgeworth

... little Lucy, the disrespect is with the goody-goody folks, who, while lauding their Deity's strength and hymning His goodness, show no recognition at all of His humor. Yet I am praised as a wit as well as a poet. If I could take up my bed and walk, I would preach a new worship—the worship of the Arch-Humorist. I should draw up the Ritual of the Ridiculous. Three times a day, when the muezzin called from the Bourse-top, all the faithful would laugh devoutly at the gigantic ...
— Dreamers of the Ghetto • I. Zangwill

... has either an uninterrupted sense of holiness, or an uninterrupted sense of sin. He that is righteous is righteous still, and knows it continually; and he that is filthy is filthy still, and knows it incessantly. If we enter eternity as the redeemed of the Lord, we take over the holy heart and spiritual affections of regeneration, and there is no change but that of progression,—a change, consequently, only in degree, but none of kind or type. The same knowledge and experience ...
— Sermons to the Natural Man • William G.T. Shedd

... to dwelling on his moral deficiencies; and one of the most obvious of these was his refusal to take things seriously. On this occasion, however, some ulterior purpose kept her from ...
— The Descent of Man and Other Stories • Edith Wharton

... that the fanatic with untrained and unbalanced mind is liable under the influence of excitement to indulge in crude debauchery; but it was strange that a man of culture, such as Clarke appeared to be, should take a part in these excesses. He had, however, no interest in the fellow and turned the talk on to other matters, and when it got ...
— Blake's Burden • Harold Bindloss

... which the Jew had placed a large quantity of plate, a little of which was solid, and a large portion showy, but comparatively valueless. It had been arranged by him in such a way as to make a superb show of wealth, in the hope that it might tempt any who should take a fancy to rob his house to expend much of their labour and energy on that horde, thereby creating an important diversion from much more ...
— The Pirate City - An Algerine Tale • R.M. Ballantyne

... should do nothing but take a stroll by the river, the day being fine, and come back when the poll was declared and make them ...
— The Reminiscences Of Sir Henry Hawkins (Baron Brampton) • Henry Hawkins Brampton

... they will shortly infringe this arrangement. Vast provinces, extending beyond the frontiers of the Union towards Mexico, are still destitute of inhabitants. The natives of the United States will forestall the rightful occupants of these solitary regions. They will take possession of the soil, and establish social institutions, so that when the legal owner arrives at length, he will find the wilderness under cultivation, and strangers quietly settled in the midst ...
— Democracy In America, Volume 1 (of 2) • Alexis de Tocqueville

... him commander of the 99th regiment of foot, but a certain old centurion, which is Brains, ran against him and overcame him. But the soldiers said unto each other, "Is it not better that we should have body than brains, and had we not better take unto ourselves the fleshpots?" So they deposed Brains and chose the Prince of Eareye as their commander. And he straightway submitted them to twelve temptations. Now it happened, that, as he was marching ...
— Punchinello, Vol. 1, No. 25, September 17, 1870 • Various

... the situation with regard to the small states on our northwestern frontier cannot be viewed in quite the same light. This will be a vital question for us, and our aim must be to take the offensive with a large superiority from the first days. For this purpose it will be necessary to concentrate a large army, followed up by strong Landwehr formations, which will induce the small states to follow us or at least to remain inactive in the theatre ...
— The Story of the Great War, Volume I (of 8) - Introductions; Special Articles; Causes of War; Diplomatic and State Papers • Various

... mebbe you'll get it right this time." Macy turned to his companions. "George, you bring up the horses. Dud, see if that bread is cooked. Might as well take it along with us—save us ...
— The Yukon Trail - A Tale of the North • William MacLeod Raine

... of danger, separation—even death itself—were not comparable with it. Sara envied the women whose men were killed in action. At least, they had a splendid memory to hold which nothing could ever soil or take away. ...
— The Hermit of Far End • Margaret Pedler

... Or one could take poison. Of course, there was a certain amount of difficulty in procuring it, but it would not be impossible to find some pretext for buying some laudanum: one could buy several small quantities at different shops until one had ...
— The Ragged Trousered Philanthropists • Robert Tressell

... Where the actual winning-post could be we had given up trying to conjecture. "It seems," Haigh remarked once, "that those two fools have made up their minds to race round this five-franc bit of an island for so long as we three fools choose to chivy them. It's a mad set-out whichever side you take it from, and the fun's evaporating. I don't know what you chaps are going to do, but the next chance I see I'm going to get down for a drink. I'm parched within an ...
— The Recipe for Diamonds • Charles John Cutcliffe Wright Hyne

... King; "here, Maud and Mamie, take the lot," and he handed the two girls the entire contents of the basket. The taller buried her face for a moment in the red Jaqueminots and drank in their fragrance. When she looked up, two big tears trickled down ...
— The Real Latin Quarter • F. Berkeley Smith

... Quiros's track to the north, after leaving the bay above-mentioned, it seems probable that there is none nearer than Queen Charlotte's Island, discovered by Captain Carteret, which lies about ninety leagues N.N.W. from Cape Cumberland, and I take to be the ...
— A Voyage Towards the South Pole and Round the World Volume 2 • James Cook

... the euening each man hath a little flesh, giuen him to eate, and they drinke the broath thereof. Howbeit in summer time; when they haue mares milk enough, they seldome eate flesh, vnles perhaps it be giuen them, or they take some beast or bird ...
— The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries - Vol. II • Richard Hakluyt

... does not mean at all that the brain of a malformed person may not perhaps develop in a marvellous manner in one particular direction. What I maintain is that, with few possible exceptions, the brains of malformed people are seldom perfectly balanced. In those particular subjects it did not take a deep student of human nature to set down the entire crowd of them as visionaries, most fantastically inclined—in which direction, having no restraint ...
— Across Unknown South America • Arnold Henry Savage Landor

... refer was that of John's first party. He knew the girls at school, and he was interested in some of them with a different interest from that he took in the boys. He never wanted to "take it out" with one of them, for an insult, in a stand-up fight, and he instinctively softened a boy's natural rudeness when he was with them. He would help a timid little girl to stand erect and slide; he would draw her ...
— Baddeck and That Sort of Thing • Charles Dudley Warner

... wealthy women reared in idleness and luxury learn the folly of keeping a trained spy attached to their persons?—a spy whose pretended calling is merely to arrange dresses and fripperies (half of which she invariably steals), but whose real delight is to take note of all her mistress's incomings and outgoings, tempers and tears—to watch her looks, her smiles and frowns,—and to start scandalous gossip concerning her in the servants' hall, from whence it gradually ...
— Thelma • Marie Corelli

... Jersey, can not be here shown, as a separate ballot is required for each party or each independent nomination. These separate ballots are all official, and are furnished at public expense; but the use of an unofficial ballot is practically allowed, since the voter is permitted to take to the voting booth a paster ballot containing a complete party ticket, printed and furnished at party expense. This he can paste over the official ballot and deposit as ...
— Elements of Civil Government • Alexander L. Peterman

... of our adventures by the way, and the young Austrian was laughing at him as if he would burst his stays. I knew, of course, that he wore those feminine additions to the toilet, because within the last hour I had seen him take them off and put them on again; and the effeminacy of that trick, which was of course merely national and professional, and not in the least to be charged against him personally, added to the disgust I felt at him and at Brunow, ...
— In Direst Peril • David Christie Murray

... particular consisteth of the same parts whereof man consisteth: that is, of knowledges which respect the body, and of knowledges that respect the mind. But before we distribute so far, it is good to constitute. For I do take the consideration in general, and at large, of human nature to be fit to be emancipate and made a knowledge by itself, not so much in regard of those delightful and elegant discourses which have been made of ...
— The Advancement of Learning • Francis Bacon

... 'I did not expect that. In your letter, written to me from London, you stated that I was to marry one of the two girls who were about to take passage with you in the Gladiator, so I concluded you meant the youngest, and I have made love to ...
— Blackbeard - Or, The Pirate of Roanoke. • B. Barker

... stand on one foot, being permitted just to touch a chair-back or the attendant's hand to give confidence. This is practised until he can keep his erect station for a few seconds without difficulty. This point of improvement may be reached in three days or a week or may take a fortnight. Women, as I have before observed, although rarely in America the victims of tabes, when they do have it have far less disturbance of balance than men, and this is to be attributed to their life-long ...
— Fat and Blood - An Essay on the Treatment of Certain Forms of Neurasthenia and Hysteria • S. Weir Mitchell

... was awkward to bring a third person in, even some one as intimate as you. Above all, in all this we reckoned on your generosity. You are a very noble and generous person. I am infinitely grateful to you. If you ever need my life, come and take it." ...
— The Duel and Other Stories • Anton Chekhov

... whirling around. "Haven't you got it? Isn't it enough that I let you take your head out of my mouth ...
— The AEsop for Children - With pictures by Milo Winter • AEsop

... answered Fitzjames; "and let us avoid the city walls and gates, and take the meadow paths past Durham College and Austin Friars, for it were best you did not show yourself abroad too much these next few days. I trust that afterwards all peril will ...
— For the Faith • Evelyn Everett-Green

... 11th of June we landed on the right bank of the Orinoco at Puerto de los Frailes, at the distance of three leagues above the Ciudad de la Piedra, to take altitudes of the sun. The longitude of this point is 67 degrees 26 minutes 20 seconds, or 1 degree 41 minutes east of the mouth of the Apure. Farther on, between the towns of La Piedra and Muitaco, or Real Corona, are the Torno and Boca del Infierno, ...
— Equinoctial Regions of America V2 • Alexander von Humboldt

... without clay. Besides, I know, as a small farmer, that good husbandry consists in not taking the same crop too frequently from the same soil; and as turnips come after wheat, according to the best rules of agriculture, I take it that an edition of Swift will do well after such a ...
— Guy Mannering, or The Astrologer, Complete, Illustrated • Sir Walter Scott

... like plants. Children turn pale if they do not get enough sunlight and so does celery. Only we like pale celery but it is not healthful for children to be too white. Just try a little experiment yourself. Take a flat stone and put it over some grass. In a week or so lift up the stone and see ...
— Daddy Takes Us to the Garden - The Daddy Series for Little Folks • Howard R. Garis

... advantages to those of the other colonies combined. A feeling of esprit de corps exists; not so strong, perhaps, as in English public schools, but very strong considering the number of day-boys. In the other colonies it does not take root at all firmly, or else degenerates into party spirit—a tendency which it also shows in Victoria, where it is moulded into better form by the masters. In most schools the prefect system has been established, of course with large modifications. ...
— Town Life in Australia - 1883 • R. E. N. (Richard) Twopeny

... became extinct, because, naturally, under such a regime, the hairy men would die off, and, finally only hairless men to beget progeny would survive. What do sensible, serious students think of this "scientific" explanation? If we try to take this explanation seriously, we find that the science of phrenology teaches that females, as a rule, inherit the traits of their fathers, and males the traits of their mothers. Hence, not the males but the females would become hairless by this ridiculous process. How do evolutionists account ...
— The Evolution Of Man Scientifically Disproved • William A. Williams

... to name some other subject. 'Choose what subject you please, gentlemen,' he said at last, 'and I'll lecture on it, but remember what I say will be on temperance.' So they have given me this subject and I have engaged to take it, but I want you to remember that what I say will be ...
— Four Girls at Chautauqua • Pansy

... por lana, y volver trasquilado,' which means, 'Take heed lest you find what you do not seek.' Do not ...
— The Ne'er-Do-Well • Rex Beach

... of verbal description for artistic purposes which must have rendered vision, or, in other words, optical representation, imperative in the case of Moses. Some of our most sober minded commentators take virtually the same view of this necessity of vision for ensuring the production of the true pattern of the Tabernacle. "The Lord," says Thomas Scott, "not only directed Moses by words how to build the Tabernacle and form its sacred furniture, but showed him a model exactly ...
— The Testimony of the Rocks - or, Geology in Its Bearings on the Two Theologies, Natural and Revealed • Hugh Miller

... men, having to gather their own fuel, and often going half mile for water. A whole day's ration is always cooked at one time on marches, as night is the only time for cooking. The decrees of an order for a detail are inexorable. A soldier must take it as it comes, for none ever know but what the next duties may be even worse than the present. As a general rule, soldiers rarely ever grumble at any detail on the eve of an engagement, for sometimes it excuses them ...
— History of Kershaw's Brigade • D. Augustus Dickert

... night! yet e'er we sever, love, Take thou this faded flower, And lay it next thy heart, ...
— The Modern Scottish Minstrel, Volumes I-VI. - The Songs of Scotland of the Past Half Century • Various

... BELL: I take Mine, laced with rum, by a camp-fire under the stars; And not too dainty to mind the ...
— Krindlesyke • Wilfrid Wilson Gibson

... the fruiterer's; he did not take the turn down to the dentist's and Mr. Wyse's. He had no errand to the Major's house or to the Captain's. Then, oh then, he rang the bell at Miss Mapp's back door. All the time Diva had been following him, keeping her head well down so as to avert ...
— Miss Mapp • Edward Frederic Benson

... in this department of Policy itself, in marking out one of the grand divisions of it, we find him particularly noticing, and openly insisting on, the form of delivery and inculcation which the new science must take here, that is, if it is going to be at all available as a ...
— The Philosophy of the Plays of Shakspere Unfolded • Delia Bacon

... by which he swore.] At the last General Election, it was consider'd as a certain road to success by the Patriotic Candidates for the Senatorial Dignity, to propose and take oaths to support certain wise measures, and to endeavour at the Repeal of certain dangerous Laws. This person was among the outrageous Partisans of Opposition, who, at that time, look the propos'd oaths with great ...
— The First of April - Or, The Triumphs of Folly: A Poem Dedicated to a Celebrated - Duchess. By the author of The Diaboliad. • William Combe

... to me," she was saying. "My father told me so a hundred times, and the persons who are trying to take it from me have no more connection with my family than this ...
— The World's Greatest Books, Vol IV. • Editors: Arthur Mee and J.A. Hammerton

... that Barrister Bill, Sidesplitter, and Fiery Harry, showed up excellently at Newmarket last week. I have always prophesied well of these three splendid animals, who take their feeds as regularly, and with as much gusto as they gallop a mile on heather when the barometer points to set fair. At the same time I consider that only a papoose, made of string and sawdust, would give more than L10,000 for any one ...
— Punch, Vol. 99., July 26, 1890. • Various

... The halls deserted, and with open doors inviting one to slip in unperceived, and pay a devoir to some Founder or noble or royal Benefactress (that should have been ours), whose portrait seems to smile upon their over-looked beadsman, and to adopt me for their own. Then, to take a peep in by the way at the butteries, and sculleries, redolent of antique hospitality: the immense caves of kitchens, kitchen fire-places, cordial recesses; ovens whose first pies were baked four centuries ...
— Charles Lamb • Walter Jerrold

... we stopped for breath to have a cut at the great vegetable screen which nature places at the entrance of virgin forests, as if to show that there is within it an unknown world to conquer. Unfortunately, the small height of the boy rendered his work useless; but he at least evinced a desire to take his part of the labor. At last the thick wall of vegetable growth was passed, and we found ourselves in a semi-obscurity, caused by ...
— Adventures of a Young Naturalist • Lucien Biart

... which were stuck all over the little balloon were newspapers of Holland, and therefore could not have been made in the moon. They were dirty papers—very dirty—and Gluck, the printer, would take his Bible oath to their having been printed ...
— The Works of Edgar Allan Poe - Volume 1 (of 5) of the Raven Edition • Edgar Allan Poe

... out that this was a land of few pleasures and a land of horses; and if, as was natural, they sought to get their pleasure out of their horses, then surely Dr. Jebb would not consign them all to hell for it, but take a view more in line with the Christian charity of ...
— The Preacher of Cedar Mountain - A Tale of the Open Country • Ernest Thompson Seton

... they had gone to the boat after leaving me here, p'raps meaning to take chances out on the lake, waves or no waves, because they thought if they stayed any longer they were agoing to be gobbled by the soldiers, sure pop. And then they missed that old crank. Course they knowed I'd been pottering around their boat, and they wanted to find out what I ...
— The, Boy Scouts on Sturgeon Island - or Marooned Among the Game-fish Poachers • Herbert Carter

... existence Islam, Catholicism, and the like, long after their due time has come to die; yet, abolish the law of imitation which causes this, and the immediate disintegration of mankind will follow. Mortar is much in the way, when we wish to take an old building to pieces and make other use of the bricks; do ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 10, No. 57, July, 1862 - A Magazine Of Literature, Art, And Politics • Various

... run on it, the first time the Skuzzy let go of the bank she ran ashore. She was taken to pieces and rebuilt on the lakes. The railroad people wanted her at first on the lower river, and asked a Mr Moore, who is well known as a daring steamboatman, to take her down. He said he would undertake it, but demanded so high a fee, including a thousand dollars for his wife if he was drowned, that his offer was refused. Yet it was well worth almost any money, for it would ...
— A Tramp's Notebook • Morley Roberts

... associated with "weather-making." The children take the little creature up, put it on their hand and thus ...
— The Child and Childhood in Folk-Thought • Alexander F. Chamberlain

... water, but allow me to take the liberty to sit down. The servant who attends to the chambers has left the house, and I've done nothing but go up and down stairs all day. It tries my old legs, and we ...
— Uarda • Georg Ebers

... trudged, exploring this path or that leading amongst the rugged cliffs, until finally he began to take note of his erratic wanderings and wonder where he was. Climbing an elevated rock near the path he poised himself upon its peak and studied the landscape spread ...
— Aunt Jane's Nieces Abroad • Edith Van Dyne

... during the time I could spare in the daylight hours, but I sat up very late reading Euclid. The servants, however, told my mother "It was no wonder the stock of candles was soon exhausted, for Miss Mary sat up reading till a very late hour;" whereupon an order was given to take away my candle as soon as I was in bed. I had, however, already gone through the first six books of Euclid, and now I was thrown on my memory, which I exercised by beginning at the first book, and demonstrating ...
— Personal Recollections, from Early Life to Old Age, of Mary Somerville • Mary Somerville

... people in bedlam are apt to be crazy. Yes, I sprinkled Missy, because she turned so black in the face, I thought she was strangling; and my step-mother always sprinkled me when I had a fit of tantrums. But let me tell you, Missy will never be a zealous Baptist, she doesn't take to ...
— At the Mercy of Tiberius • August Evans Wilson

... good education and property, find no difficulty in forming a legitimate establishment. At the quadroon ball, only coloured ladies are admitted, the men of that caste, be it understood, are shut out by the white gentlemen. To take away all semblance of vulgarity, the price of admission is fixed at two dollars, so that only persons of the better ...
— The Journal of Negro History, Volume 2, 1917 • Various

... peach of a blanket. Kind of a shame to waste such a good blanket, ain't it? Why don't you take it off him? He'll never tell. But say, are you sure the County don't pay for that suit of clothes and coffin and six feet of diggin' he ...
— The Lady Doc • Caroline Lockhart

... pint of it add one table-spoonful of salt and one teaspoonful of soda, and mix well; then add one pint of cold water, and set on the fire until it comes to the boiling point Now set away to cool, and when cool and hard, take off the butter in a cake. Wipe dry and put away for cooking purposes. ...
— Miss Parloa's New Cook Book • Maria Parloa

... and of tin, but no beds of coal. The copper ore, which requires a very large quantity of fuel for its reduction, is sent by sea to the coalfields of Wales, and is smelted at Swansea; whilst the vessels which convey it, take back coals to work the steam-engines for draining the mines, and to smelt the tin, which requires for that purpose a much smaller quantity ...
— On the Economy of Machinery and Manufactures • Charles Babbage

... "I'll take some hours to think this matter over," said Rachel, "and give you your answer this afternoon. That'll be time ...
— The Red Acorn • John McElroy

... Take, for instance, the exercise of political power. Is a state free in proportion to the number of its subjects who are admitted to rank among its citizens, or to the degree in which its recognised citizens are invested with political authority? In the latter ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, No. CCCXXVIII. February, 1843. Vol. LIII. • Various

... ladies, you will, at once, tell me so, frankly and instantly, and let me, at least, have my choice whether I shall be desperate enough to go on, with such a rival, or at once surrender the whole race into your hands, and take, for the future, to Antediluvians with ...
— The Works of Lord Byron: Letters and Journals, Volume 2. • Lord Byron

... no reason for your coming," I said with unwonted gravity. "It would have been better if you had stayed in London, and it will be best if you take the ...
— Simon the Jester • William J. Locke

... the stones, I kiss the moss on the wall, And wish I could pass impregnate into the place. I wish I could take it all in a last embrace. I wish with my breast I here could ...
— Bay - A Book of Poems • D. H. Lawrence

... the orderly say, "All right, Vukich, get that filled at the dispensary. Take one after each meal and come back to see us when the bottle's empty. Unless the pain gets worse, of course. But I ...
— Criminal Negligence • Jesse Francis McComas

... is an important feature of apparatus in case-hardening—possibly more so than in ordinary tempering. One reason for this is because of the large quantities of pieces usually dumped into the tank at a time. One cannot take time to separate the articles themselves from the case-hardening mixture, and the whole content of the box is droped into the bath in short order, as exposure to air of the heated work is fatal to results. Unless it is split up, it is likely to go to the bottom as a solid mass, in which case very ...
— The Working of Steel - Annealing, Heat Treating and Hardening of Carbon and Alloy Steel • Fred H. Colvin

... disabling, so that I seem to cumber the earth. They say that summer, when it comes, will do me good. How much more sure that the sight of you will do me good, and I trust that, when your business will let you, you will give me that happiness. In the mean while will you take the trouble to send the enclosed and my answer, if it be fit and proper and properly addressed? I give you this office, because really the kindness seems so large and unlimited, that, if the letter had ...
— Yesterdays with Authors • James T. Fields

... cried vehemently, "No, no!" then stretched his lips in a very ghastly grin and turned to take the can from the oven, but his hand missed it, and he appeared to grope as if he were blind, though he looked at the can all the time. Then he catched it and brought it to his mouth, but trembled so much that he spilt as much as he drank, ...
— The Frozen Pirate • W. Clark Russell

... this field, demonstrated Congress's lukewarm commitment to civil rights reform that severely limited federal action. The reluctance of Congress to enact the reforms augured in the Brown decision convinced many Negroes that they would have to take further measures to gain their full constitutional rights. They had seen presidents and federal judges embrace principles long argued by civil rights organizations, but to little avail. Seven years after ...
— Integration of the Armed Forces, 1940-1965 • Morris J. MacGregor Jr.

... should have a seat in the Assembly, now that McIntyre is in, seems to drag him into as low depths as any one. I cannot see why they should be so anxious about it, unless it is that, since they cannot afford to go home, they want to take as good a position here as any of their neighbours. Grant's affairs will suffer if he has to be so much in Melbourne, and at best he will make ...
— Mr. Hogarth's Will • Catherine Helen Spence

... settled, and Sir Felix agreeing to take a pot-luck dinner with his two friends, the trio resolved on a morning lounge of observation, and sallying forth, took their way along ...
— Real Life In London, Volumes I. and II. • Pierce Egan

... perforce imbued by it. Indeed, we know of few writers whom we can point to with more confidence as calculated, in antidote to the fret and chafe inseparable from existence in our day, to induce a tone of repose and resignation in ourselves, and a disposition to take charity as our watchword in our ...
— Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science, Vol. 15, - No. 87, March, 1875 • Various

... women would take some other time for coming, confound 'em," says my lord, laying his ...
— The Virginians • William Makepeace Thackeray

... that very minute you come and knocked on the door, and I knowed it was a sign—I knowed you was the one for me to tell it to. And so I've done it, and already I think I feel a little bit easier in my mind. And so that's all, mister. But I wisht please you'd take that pistol away with you when you go—I don't never want to see it again as ...
— The Escape of Mr. Trimm - His Plight and other Plights • Irvin S. Cobb

... necessary to re-break the thigh to straighten it. Doctor Grenfell could not do this without assistance. There was but one thing to do, take the lad ...
— The Story of Grenfell of the Labrador - A Boy's Life of Wilfred T. Grenfell • Dillon Wallace

... hat and rushed downstairs. But here another difficulty beset him. It was easy enough to take the ordinary road to the convent, but would SHE follow that public one in what must be a surreptitious escape? And might she not have eluded the procession that morning, and even now be concealed somewhere, waiting for the darkness to make ...
— In a Hollow of the Hills • Bret Harte

... apt to resemble their fathers in mental traits, disposition, and constitution; while boys take after their mothers. Boys procreated by intelligent mothers will be intelligent; while it does not always follow that the sons of intelligent fathers are intelligent. The poets Burns, Ben Johnson, Goethe, Walter Scott, Byron, and Lamartine were all born of women remarkable for vivacity and brilliance ...
— The Four Epochs of Woman's Life • Anna M. Galbraith

... as many growth limiters as possible and watch the plant's own efforts take over. One of the best examples I've ever seen of how this works was in a neighbor's backyard greenhouse. This retired welder liked his liquor. Having more time than money and little respect for legal absurdities, he had constructed a small stainless steel pot still, fermented his own mash, and ...
— Organic Gardener's Composting • Steve Solomon

... Writers uniformly take a wicked pleasure in maligning the Basque language. Its spelling and syntax, its words and sentences, its methods of construction, are openly derided. Unusual word-forms and distended proper names ...
— A Midsummer Drive Through The Pyrenees • Edwin Asa Dix

... Honour I cannot prevail upon her to come on. She's Affraid the Audience will take her for one of ...
— The Covent Garden Theatre, or Pasquin Turn'd Drawcansir • Charles Macklin

... before I tore myself away I doubted of this. But now I see better how Christ works in me. As soon as you take one step in his direction, though it be in the pitch dark, then he makes the two following steps clear for you. The great relief in my heart and my speaking much and freely with you, dear Elsje, has made so much clearer to me. I believe that I can do something in the ...
— The Bride of Dreams • Frederik van Eeden

... lived seven years, and none of them having left us till they married and settled; and, thank God, it is a great satisfaction they have all done well, improved their situation in life, and got up in the world. The man servant and two maid servants, whom I have now remaining with me, to take care of my cottage, have lived with me, I think it is now ...
— Memoirs of Henry Hunt, Esq. Volume 3 • Henry Hunt

... acquaintance with him, be satisfied, though it cannot discourse nor dispute, nor speak to cases of conscience, as some others; if we know him, it matters not though we be ignorant of many things, and thereby become less esteemed of by others. Here is the true test, by which we may take a right estimate of our own, or of others' knowledge. The true rule to try knowledge by, is not fine notions, clear and distinct expressions, but heart-acquaintance with him; "in whom are hid all the treasures of wisdom and knowledge," Col. ...
— Christ The Way, The Truth, and The Life • John Brown (of Wamphray)

... liked rather than disliked the Countess; but she was of the lightest, and the least opposition drove her out of her course. "And you think you know her! And she, if she could save you from death by opening an eye, would go with a patch on it till her dying day! Take my word for it, Monsieur, between her and her lover ...
— Count Hannibal - A Romance of the Court of France • Stanley J. Weyman

... of men, by which he will put himself into the most intimate relations of sympathy, and confidence, and friendship, with the mind of the few; by which he will reproduce his purposes and his faculties in them, and train them to take up in their turn that thread of knowledges which is ...
— The Philosophy of the Plays of Shakspere Unfolded • Delia Bacon

... time. But keep stout hearts, lads," he added, as he noticed gloomy expressions sweep over the faces of his followers; "keep stout hearts—don't get melancholy; for in this here world we've got to take things as we find 'em; and no doubt this storm's all for the best, ef we could only ...
— Ella Barnwell - A Historical Romance of Border Life • Emerson Bennett

... What—what you desire would not mend your life, but break it utterly. I am speaking plainly. As I have told you, you interest me; so far that is the extent of my feelings. I do not know whether they would go any farther, but on your account as well as my own I will not take the risk. We have come to an impasse. I am sorry. I wish we might have been friends, but what you have said makes it impossible. There is only one thing to do, and that is for ...
— The Crossing • Winston Churchill

... ship in the mouth of the river Dee, who was going a voyage (being one of his acquaintance), upon his return, with two burgesses who had gone the same errand, through the importunity of one of them, they turned all aside to take a bottle in an inn by the way. There he tarried till he thought they had drunk sufficiently, and, finding they were not disposed to go home, he laid down his share of the reckoning, and was going away, but they, being averse to part with him, and ...
— Biographia Scoticana (Scots Worthies) • John Howie

... coming to take me away!" exclaimed Ralph bewildered. "What has the Government to do ...
— Swallow • H. Rider Haggard

... Miss Hester, a clergyman had best take to God's books instead of the Devil's books on that day—and so I took the liberty of telling your parson." Hetty looked as if she thought it was a liberty which Mr. Wolfe had taken. "And I told our young friend that ...
— The Virginians • William Makepeace Thackeray

... 1605 the bishops cited the clergy of Puritan views to appear at St. Paul's in London in order to take the oath. There were some members of this party who held it lawful to conform to the Anglican Church because it at least acknowledged the true doctrine. These had time for reflection given them; the rest who persevered in an opposition of principle were ...
— A History of England Principally in the Seventeenth Century, Volume I (of 6) • Leopold von Ranke

... elder brother. Once more, in imagination, he was hurrying out of his father's apartment; and the loud and bitter cry of his wronged brother was ringing through the tent, never to die away or be forgotten. He saw again his brother white with rage, and heard him take the solemn oath, that, as soon as the mourning for his father was over, he would be avenged. He heard his frightened mother plead with Isaac, that he might be sent away to her brother in Padan Aram. He heard his father's consent, and saw his mother packing up the few ...
— Little Folks (November 1884) - A Magazine for the Young • Various

... scorpion, the patient suffers for two weeks. But when, about ten days later, we tried the experiment of the stone upon a poor coolie, just bitten by a cobra, it would not even stick to the wound, and the poor wretch shortly expired. I do not take upon myself to offer, either a defence, or an explanation of the virtues of the "stone." I simply state the facts and leave the future career of the story to its own fate. The sceptics may deal with it as they will. Yet I can easily find people in India ...
— From the Caves and Jungles of Hindostan • Helena Pretrovna Blavatsky

... of the United States forces employed in the attempt to invade and take Canada, when they desired peace; and when peace was proclaimed, they did not find themselves in possession of an inch of ...
— The Loyalists of America and Their Times, Vol. 2 of 2 - From 1620-1816 • Edgerton Ryerson

... take in German literature has hitherto been confined almost exclusively to the literature of the last fifty years, and very little is known of those fourteen centuries during which the German language had been growing up and gathering ...
— Chips From A German Workshop. Vol. III. • F. Max Mueller

... my Paris address in London for your letters to be sent on. Sometimes I think my enemies may be tormenting you, and then I blame myself for not bringing you with me, in spite of every disadvantage. Sometimes I think you may be ill, and then I have an impulse to take the first train and fly back to Rome. I know I cannot be with you always, but this absence is cruel. Happily it will soon be over, and we shall see an end of all sadness. Don't suffer for me. Don't let my cares distress you. Whatever happens, nothing can divide us, because love ...
— The Eternal City • Hall Caine

... impressively, "before I close I would adjure every one of you to take the reins of his household into his own hands," and then looking straight at ...
— Tess of the Storm Country • Grace Miller White

... at the doors of which their ears were invaded with a strange sound, being that of a human voice imitating the noise of a drum. The captain, hearing this alarm, made a full stop, and, giving the Count to understand that his majesty was busy, begged he would not take it amiss, if the introduction should be delayed for a few moments. Fathom, curious to know the meaning of what he had heard, applied to his guide for information, and learned that the king and the major, whom he had nominated to the post of his general-in-chief, were employed ...
— The Adventures of Ferdinand Count Fathom, Complete • Tobias Smollett

... just how great a disappointment her visit to the frontier was proving to that young lady, simply because she kept her own counsel. There were women in the garrison who longed to take her to their hearts and homes, she was so fresh and pure and sweet and winning, they said; but how could they, when her sister would recognize them only by the coldest possible nod? Nellie was not happy, that was certain, though she made no complaint, and though the young officers who were ...
— The Deserter • Charles King

... this boat than I would to be one of the selectmen," continued Bobtail. "She's a tip-top sea boat. Take the helm, Monkey, and ...
— Little Bobtail - or The Wreck of the Penobscot. • Oliver Optic

... his own mood from the child; it knew—let him feign otherwise never so cunningly—exactly what he felt, glad or sad, or between the two, and no acting could deceive him. It was a strange, intensely interesting study to me; one to which I daily returned with fresh avidity. He would let me take him in my arms and talk to him; would sometimes, after looking at me long and earnestly, break into a smile—a strange, grave, sweet smile. Then I could do no otherwise than set him hastily down and look away, for so unearthly a smile I had never seen. ...
— The First Violin - A Novel • Jessie Fothergill

... of foolscap make, For bards to wear in dog-day weather; Or bards the bells alone may take, And leave to wits the cap and feather, Tetotums we've for patriots got, Who court the mob with antics humble; Alike their short and dizzy lot, A glorious spin, and then—a ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction - Volume 19, No. 528, Saturday, January 7, 1832 • Various

... with rage, mute as an iceberg. Then, zip! Enter Beverly Plank—the girl's rescuer at a pinch—her preserver, the saviour of her "face," the big, highly coloured, leaden-eyed deus ex machina. Would she take fifty cents on the dollar? Would she? to buy herself a new "face"? And put it all over Quarrier? And live happy ever after? Would she? Oh, ...
— The Fighting Chance • Robert W. Chambers

... water; and heartily thankful we felt, for the Sri must have assuredly gone to pieces with another hour of it. Midnight saw us scrambling, stiff and numbed, up the muddy "batang" or pole that formed the landing-place of the fort, and we were not sorry to take off our saturated clothes, and, after a stiff glass of grog apiece, to tumble into the two little camp bedsteads, that, with the exception of a table and two chairs, formed the sole ...
— On the Equator • Harry de Windt

... But when the crocodile saw what a nice house it was—with all the different places for the different kinds of animals—he too wanted to live with the Doctor. He asked couldn't he sleep in the fish-pond at the bottom of the garden, if he promised not to eat the fish. When the circus-men came to take him back he got so wild and savage that he frightened them away. But to every one in the house he was always as ...
— The Story of Doctor Dolittle • Hugh Lofting

... "Take your own time. There is no hurry. I dare say you will find there all you may want. I shall remain on the terrace until you summon me." With that I went out on the terrace, drawing close the glass door ...
— The Lady of the Shroud • Bram Stoker

... Doucebelle, thou wouldst have more consideration for people's feelings!" said Eva in a querulous tone, smoothing the petals of her flowers. "I am sure, whenever I look at a bouquet for the next twelvemonth, I shall think of this. I cannot help it—things do take such hold of me! And just think, how easily all that ...
— Earl Hubert's Daughter - The Polishing of the Pearl - A Tale of the 13th Century • Emily Sarah Holt

... at a good height, and our vision could take in a wide expanse of land and water. The peculiarity of the surface of Mars was noticeable, the seas being long, narrow inlets, as it were, running through or between winding strings of land, a decided contrast to the great oceans ...
— Daybreak: A Romance of an Old World • James Cowan

... Penelope to be his wife. Tyndarus consented. Ulysses then advised that Helen should choose for herself which of the princes she would have for her husband, but that before she did so, all the suitors should pledge themselves by oath to submit to her decision, and engage that if any one should take her away from the husband of her choice, they would all ...
— The Story of Troy • Michael Clarke

... effected by means of two levers, p (moved by the cams, e), whose extremities at every revolution of the machine seize by the two ends a link that maneuvers the fasteners. The binding of one sheet finished, the lower arms of the machine again take their position, the wires move forward the length necessary to form new staples, a new sheet is laid, and the same operation is proceeded with. The number of staples and their distance are changed, according to the size of the book, by introducing into the machine as much ...
— Scientific American Supplement, No. 362, December 9, 1882 • Various

... right if we are back by supper-time," said St. George, hastily. "Only, of course, we must take care not to catch cold. Come and help ...
— In the Yule-Log Glow, Book II - Christmas Tales from 'Round the World • Various

... was a desperate man, with blood already on his hands. It was more than likely that he would do the deed he had threatened to do. What could be easier than to watch the squire on one of those evenings when he went up the park alone, to fall upon him and take his life? Of late Mr. Juxon did not even take his dog with him. The savage bloodhound would be a good protector; but even when he took Stamboul with him by day, he never brought him at night. It was too long for the beast to wait, ...
— A Tale of a Lonely Parish • F. Marion Crawford

... the following pages to reproduce the elegant and incisive style of a master of French prose, not even the inadequacies of a translation can obscure the force of his argument. The only introduction, therefore, that seems possible must take the form of a request to the reader to study M. Faguet's criticism of modern democracy with the daily paper in his hand. He will then see, taking chapter by chapter, how in some aspects the phenomena of English democracy are identical with those described in the text, and how in others ...
— The Cult of Incompetence • Emile Faguet

... her head. "It is useless," said she; "nay, I will go further," she continued with a sigh, "I am afraid that there is more beneath this letter than we can fathom. It is not what my mother would write if this were all she meant. I will take Marguerite's place and ...
— The King's Warrant - A Story of Old and New France • Alfred H. Engelbach

... Barandier and Houlet. The cultivation is admirable, the soil excellent, and the tea-plants peculiarly vigorous. Each shrub was so placed that a man can easily go all round it, and young plants, self-sown, were springing up below every old one; of these offsets, I was made welcome to as many as I could take away, and should have had a great stock, but that the ground had been very recently cleared. M. da Luz showed me his magazines of prepared tea, which were extensive and ...
— The Commercial Products of the Vegetable Kingdom • P. L. Simmonds

... ovation," she cried, sprawling out of her first-class carriage. "They'll take us for royalty. Oh, ...
— Where Angels Fear to Tread • E. M. Forster

... man by the name of Watkins. He was a good man, and a sincere friend to me. His wife was a kind-hearted and benevolent woman. I met her at the door, and told her a friend of mine had given me this package to take care of, and I would let her see the contents at another time. She took it and laid it away; I then hastened to the prison to meet Mrs. B——, who I knew expected me to accompany her, or to be present with her that day. Could I get to the prison as soon, or sooner than she, suspicion ...
— Secret Band of Brothers • Jonathan Harrington Green

... and cafes, or of places where food in abundance could be procured, though the price was rather astonishing. Captain Frankland had some business to transact with a merchant—he left us at one of them to dine. When he rejoined us, he told us that he would take us to a scene in which he hoped we should never be tempted to mix. We went out, and soon reached a magnificent building, full of spacious halls, with an orchestra keeping up a succession of attractive airs. Making ...
— A Voyage round the World - A book for boys • W.H.G. Kingston

... for them by treaty of 1868. These Indians are natives of the section of the country where they are now located. Prior to 1864 no less than seven treaties had been made with these tribes, which were successively broken on their part, and that, with but one exception, before the Senate could take action on the question of their ratification. In 1864 the Navajoes were made captives by the military, and taken to the Bosque Redondo reservation, which had been set apart for the Mescalero Apaches, where they ...
— The Indian Question (1874) • Francis A. Walker

... sword can only be borne by a man who is both brave and daring.' Hott answered, 'You shall be convinced that I am such a man.' The king said, 'Who knows whether your character hasn't changed more than appearances show? Take the sword and may you have good fortune!' Then Hott attacked the beast and struck at it as soon as he was near enough so that he could hit it, and the beast fell down dead. Bothvar said, 'Look, lord, what he has done!' The king replied, ...
— The Relation of the Hrolfs Saga Kraka and the Bjarkarimur to Beowulf • Oscar Ludvig Olson

... journey to Egypt and take possession of the land. They gave it up when their princes reminded them of the Biblical prohibition (11) against dwelling in Egypt. Likewise they were restrained from attacking the Edomites, Ammonites, and Moabites, for the Torah commands considerate treatment of them. Finally they decided ...
— THE LEGENDS OF THE JEWS VOLUME IV BIBLE TIMES AND CHARACTERS - FROM THE EXODUS TO THE DEATH OF MOSES • BY LOUIS GINZBERG

... flew off to try to take in her governess and Mrs. Wilmot, whom she found completing their leisurely promenade, and considering where they ...
— The Daisy Chain, or Aspirations • Charlotte Yonge

... "Why,—yes—, I'll take it, Jack, robber that you are," said the old man cheerily. "You may not be as bad as they say, an' no man is worse than his heart. But what in the worl' do you want to hold up as po' a man as me—an' if I do say it, yo' frien' when ...
— The Bishop of Cottontown - A Story of the Southern Cotton Mills • John Trotwood Moore

... did not believe that because some children made fun of a gentleman who was short of hair, God sent two bears and tore the little darlings to pieces. He had a tender heart, and he thought about the mothers who would take the pieces, the bloody fragments of the children, and press them to their bosom in a frenzy of grief; he thought about their wails and lamentations, and could not believe that God was such an infinite monster. That was all he thought, ...
— Lectures of Col. R. G. Ingersoll, Volume I • Robert Green Ingersoll

... old Virginia family and early displayed enterprise, boldness and discretion. He won the promotion to a captaincy at the age of twenty-two, and was barely thirty years of age when called to take part in this memorable exploration. Clark was also a native of Virginia, but his childhood had been spent in Kentucky, whither his parents removed. He was a younger brother of the more famous General George Rogers ...
— Deerfoot in The Mountains • Edward S. Ellis

... lovely rings at this hour. A hard mouth, thin nose, very white hair and very black eyebrows. Got a temper I should say, and is likely to prove an exacting mistress. But I want a quiet home, and the salary is good. I'll try it, if she'll take me." ...
— The Secret Passage • Fergus Hume



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