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Parch   /pɑrtʃ/   Listen
Parch

verb
(past & past part. parched; pres. part. parching)
1.
Cause to wither or parch from exposure to heat.  Synonym: sear.






WordNet 3.0 © 2010 Princeton University








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"Parch" Quotes from Famous Books



... accomplish his will; the power of gravitation, the correlative of levitation; the power of command; the power of creative will. These are the endowments of the spiritual man. Further, the spiritual body is unassailable. Fire burns it not, water wets it not, the sword cleaves it not, dry winds parch it not. And, it is said, the spiritual man can impart something of this quality and ...
— The Yoga Sutras of Patanjali • Charles Johnston

... none the good foolish things we has now. We had cornbread and blackeyed peas and beans and sorghum 'lasses. Old master give us our rations and iffen dat didn't fill us up, we jus' went lank. Sometimes we had possum and rabbits and fish, iffen we cotched dem on Sunday. I seed Old Missy parch coffee in a skittle, and it good coffee, too. We couldn't go to the store and buy things, 'cause ...
— Slave Narratives: a Folk History of Slavery in the United States From Interviews with Former Slaves. - Texas Narratives, Part 2 • Works Projects Administration

... gathers ground fast at the Labourers heel 630 Homeward returning. High in Front advanc't, The brandisht Sword of God before them blaz'd Fierce as a Comet; which with torrid heat, And vapour as the Libyan Air adust, Began to parch that temperate Clime; whereat In either hand the hastning Angel caught Our lingring Parents, and to th' Eastern Gate Let them direct, and down the Cliff as fast To the subjected Plaine; then disappeer'd. They looking back, all th' Eastern side beheld 640 Of ...
— The Poetical Works of John Milton • John Milton

... the streams that most refresh us In the desert parch'd and drear, Sorrow renders love more precious, Makes the cherish'd ...
— Eidolon - The Course of a Soul and Other Poems • Walter R. Cassels

... grinding corn. Owamata The trough or outer frame of stone slabs. Mataki The metate or grinding slab. Kakomta mataki The coarsest grinding slab. Talak mataki The next finer slab; from "talaki" to parch crushed corn in a vessel at the fire. Pinymta mataki The slab of finest texture; from "pin," fine. Mata tci The upright partition stones separating the metates. The rubbing stones have the same names as the metates. Hawiwita A ...
— A Study of Pueblo Architecture: Tusayan and Cibola • Victor Mindeleff and Cosmos Mindeleff

... hour of rest! but Hagar found No shelter in the wilderness, and on She kept her weary way, until the boy Hung down his head, and open'd his parch'd lips For water; but she could not give it him. She laid him down beneath the sultry sky,— For it was better than the close, hot breath Of the thick pines,—and tried to comfort him; But he was sore athirst, and his blue eyes Were dim and bloodshot, and he could ...
— Home Pastimes; or Tableaux Vivants • James H. Head

... our Breakfasts of Parch'd Corn, having nothing but that to subsist on for above 100 Miles. All the Pine-Trees were vanish'd, for we had seen none for two days. We pass'd through a delicate rich Soil this day; no great Hills, ...
— A New Voyage to Carolina • John Lawson

... crystal well, In cool and shady dell, Unto the parch'd gazelle, Is my love to me. And dearer than things fair, However rich and rare, In earth, or sea, or air, Is my love to me— My love ...
— The Modern Scottish Minstrel, Volume VI - The Songs of Scotland of the Past Half Century • Various

... Defence from Phoebus', not from Cupid's beams, To you I mourn, nor to the deaf I sing, 'The woods shall answer, and their echo ring.'[10] The hills and rocks attend my doleful lay; Why art thou prouder and more hard than they? The bleating sheep with my complaints agree, They parch'd with heat, and I inflamed by thee. 20 The sultry Sirius burns the thirsty plains, While in thy heart eternal ...
— The Poetical Works Of Alexander Pope, Vol. 1 • Alexander Pope et al

... There shady trees from scorching beams, Yield shelter to the feather'd throng: They drink, and to the bounteous streams Return the tribute of their song. 13. His rains from heav'n parch'd hills recruit, That soon transmit the liquid store: 'Till earth is burthen'd with her fruit, And nature's lap can hold ...
— The Lives of the Poets of Great Britain and Ireland (1753) - Vol. IV • Theophilus Cibber

... fancy-haunted room, What mutter'd curses trembled through the gloom, When pale, and shiv'ring, and bedew'd with fear, The dying sceptic felt his hour drew near! From his parch'd tongue no sainted murmurs fell, No bright hopes kindled at his faint farewell; As the last throes of death convulsed his cheek, He gnash'd, and scowl'd, and raised a hideous shriek, Rounded his eyes into a ghastly glare, Lock'd his white lips—and all was mute despair! Go, child of darkness, ...
— Recreations of Christopher North, Volume 2 • John Wilson

... which I had taken from the dead man's neck, seemed to sear my bosom, and parch the skin, so heated did I fancy it grew when my thoughts wandered to the dying man and his ...
— The Gold Hunter's Adventures - Or, Life in Australia • William H. Thomes

... Parch. Pilgr. I. 608.—Hawes sailed in the fleet under Keeling, in 1615, which carried out Sir Thomas Roe, already related in Sect. IV. of this chapter; and the present short article almost exclusively relates to the new factory at Cranganore on the Malabar ...
— A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Volume IX. • Robert Kerr

... destruction ere the appointed time? Softened and calmed, each angry passion lulled, By a soft voice, "Come in," he trembling calls. Slow on its hinges turns the ponderous door, And "Friend," the word that falls from stranger lips. As dew on flowers, as rain on parchd ground, So came the word unto the prisoner's ear. He speaks not-moves not. O, his heart is full, Too full for utterance; and, as floods of tears Flow from his eyes so all unused to weep, He bows down low, e'en at the stranger's feet. He had not known what 't was to have a friend. The word came ...
— Town and Country, or, Life at Home and Abroad • John S. Adams

... Parch as above, and grind. Allow half a cup to a quart of boiling water, and let it steep fifteen minutes. Strain, and drink plain, or with milk ...
— The Easiest Way in Housekeeping and Cooking - Adapted to Domestic Use or Study in Classes • Helen Campbell

... The wind may parch his hide, or freeze him to the bone, While the wolf walks far from the door; Still year on year he sits, with his five unholy wits, And watches for ...
— Behind the Arras - A Book of the Unseen • Bliss Carman

... most assuredly, if that's what's expected of me for the ceremony," answered Everett with a delightful laugh. "Here's a pan of delicacies for the hens, and this bucket is for you to bring some shelled corn for Miss Rose Mary to parch for them, when you come to ...
— Rose of Old Harpeth • Maria Thompson Daviess

... one or two Frenchmen that squatted in the flats further west, and married squaws; and some of the Scotch- Irishers, from the Cherry Valley, would come on to the lake, and borrow my canoe to take a mess of parch, or drop a line for salmon- trout; but, in the main, it was a cheerful place, and I had but little to disturb me in it. John would come, and John knows. Mohegan turned his dark face at this appeal; and, moving his hand forward with graceful ...
— The Pioneers • James Fenimore Cooper

... violin of flesh and blood made by the Evil One's hand, may I not even execrate thee in peace; but is it necessary that, at the moment when I curse, the longing to hear thee again should parch my soul like hell-thirst? And since I have satiated thy lust for revenge, since thou hast withered my life and withered my genius, is it not time for pity? May I not hear one note, only one note of thine, O singer, O wicked and ...
— Hauntings • Vernon Lee

... moon Smote by the fresh beam of the springing east; And all his greaves and cuisses dash'd with drops Of onset; and the light and lustrous curls— That made his forehead like a rising sun High from the dais-throne—were parch'd with dust; Or, clotted into points and hanging loose, Mix'd with the knightly growth that fringed his lips. So like a shatter'd column lay the King; Not like that Arthur who, with lance in rest, From spur to plume a star of tournament, Shot thro' the lists at Camelot, ...
— Famous Tales of Fact and Fancy - Myths and Legends of the Nations of the World Retold for Boys and Girls • Various

... against The rushing of your congregated wings? Even now your living wheel turns o'er my head! Ye, as ye pass, toss high the desart sands, 25 That roar and whiten, like a burst of waters, A sweet appearance, but a dread illusion, To the parch'd caravan that roams by night. And ye build up on the becalmed waves That whirling pillar, which from earth to heaven 30 Stands vast, and moves in blackness. Ye too split The ice-mount, and with fragments many and huge, Tempest the new-thaw'd sea, whose sudden ...
— The Complete Poetical Works of Samuel Taylor Coleridge - Vol I and II • Samuel Taylor Coleridge

... I'm telling the truth, I did. Some didn't. One neighbor got mad and give each hand one ear of corn nine or ten o'clock. They take it to the cook house and get it made up in hominy. Some would be so hungry they would parch the corn rather 'an wait. He'd give 'em meal to make a big kettle of mush. When he was good he done better. Give 'em more ...
— Slave Narratives: A Folk History of Slavery in the United States from Interviews with Former Slaves, Arkansas Narratives, Part 4 • Works Projects Administration

... held ready, and in an incredibly short time barrel after barrel of corn was broken open and emptied, while even the little children possessed themselves of pans and kettles full, and hastened to the fires that were blazing around to parch and cook that which they ...
— Wau-bun - The Early Day in the Northwest • Juliette Augusta Magill Kinzie

... speak from sad experience, I would rather be a convict in States Prison or a slave in a rice swamp, than to pass through life under the harrow of debt. If you have but fifty cents and can get no more for the week, buy a peck of corn, parch it, and live on it rather than owe any man a dollar." He next started the Log Cabin. It was started in the beginning of 1840, designed to be run six months and then discontinued. Into this undertaking ...
— Hidden Treasures - Why Some Succeed While Others Fail • Harry A. Lewis

... tree His troughs, or on the cattle stamps a brand, Or numbers on the corn-heaps; some make sharp The stakes and two-pronged forks, and willow-bands Amerian for the bending vine prepare. Now let the pliant basket plaited be Of bramble-twigs; now set your corn to parch Before the fire; now bruise it with the stone. Nay even on holy days some tasks to ply Is right and lawful: this no ban forbids, To turn the runnel's course, fence corn-fields in, Make springes for the birds, burn up the briars, And plunge in ...
— The Georgics • Virgil

... red rent cloak and bonnet black, And torn green gown loose hanging at her back, One who an infant in her arms sustains, And seems in patience striving with her pains; Pinch'd are her looks, as one who pines for bread, Whose cares are growing—and whose hopes are fled; Pale her parch'd lips, her heavy eyes sunk low, And tears unnoticed from their channels flow; Serene her manner, till some sudden pain Frets the meek soul, and then she's calm again; - Her broken pitcher to the pool she takes, And every step with cautious ...
— The Parish Register • George Crabbe

... 15th of March Friday 1805 a fine day I put out all the goods & Parch meal Clothing &c to Sun, a number of Indians here to day They make maney remarks respecting our goods &c. Set Some men about ...
— The Journals of Lewis and Clark • Meriwether Lewis et al

... unwritten law of the desert. No Mormon would refuse you or your horse a drink, or even a reasonable supply for your stock. But you can't come in here and take our water for your own use, to supplant us, to parch our stock. Why, even an Indian ...
— The Heritage of the Desert • Zane Grey

... died out since you and I came into the world? or was it burnt over during the war, like the great prairies, where the hot flames parch up all the sweet green grass and the bright flowers, killing them root and blossom, snakes likewise? One thing is certain, my dear sisters in the cause, honesty among men and modesty among women go hand in hand all ...
— Phemie Frost's Experiences • Ann S. Stephens

... paralizito—ulo. Paramount superega. Paramour kromviro—ino. Parapet randmuro. Paraphrase parafrazo. Parasite parazito. Parasitic parazita. Parasol sunombrelo. Parboil duonboli. Parcel pako, pakajxo. Parcel out dispecigi, dividi. Parcels-office pakajxejo. Parcel-post posxta paketo. Parch sekigi. Parchment pergameno. Pardon pardoni, senkulpigi. Pardon pardono. Pardonable pardonebla. Pare sxeli. Parenthesis parentezo. Parents gepatroj. Parentage naskigxo, deveno. Parental gepatra. Paring ...
— English-Esperanto Dictionary • John Charles O'Connor and Charles Frederic Hayes

... me, thus resum'd: "Thy wish imports that I vouchsafe to do For thy sake what thou wilt not do for mine. But since God's will is that so largely shine His grace in thee, I will be liberal too. Guido of Duca know then that I am. Envy so parch'd my blood, that had I seen A fellow man made joyous, thou hadst mark'd A livid paleness overspread my cheek. Such harvest reap I of the seed I sow'd. O man, why place thy heart where there doth need Exclusion of participants in good? This is Rinieri's ...
— The Divine Comedy, Complete - The Vision of Paradise, Purgatory and Hell • Dante Alighieri

... flower that turned to the adder, The fruit that changed to the asp; When the day-spring in darkness closes, As the sunset fades from the hills, With the fragrance of perish'd roses, With the music of parch'd-up rills. ...
— Poems • Adam Lindsay Gordon

... locusts, and what there doth spring With honey that from virgin hives distill'd; Parch'd body, hollow eyes, some uncouth thing Made him appear, long ...
— The Golden Treasury - Of the Best Songs and Lyrical Poems in the English Language • Various

... in the branches above me looked wisely. He was wondering how long before the green burrs would parch and give him their brown chestnuts. I was contemplating a metaphysical burr. I wanted to remain true to Phyllis, though there wasn't any sense in my doing so. Had Gretchen resembled any one but Phyllis I never should have been in such a predicament. I ...
— Arms and the Woman • Harold MacGrath

... locusts and what there doth spring, With honey that from virgin hives distill'd, Parch'd body, hollow eyes, some uncouth thing Made him appear, long since from earth exiled." ...
— John the Baptist • F. B. Meyer

... the beams, the sting, so strong I prove, Which my chief part doth pass through, parch, and tie, That of the stroke, the heat, and knot of love, Wounded, inflamed, knit to the death, ...
— A Defence of Poesie and Poems • Philip Sidney

... take out of it a whole lot of little bundles wrapped in white cloth. As he lay out a package he would say "grass hoppers," "spiders", "scorpian," "snake heads", etc., then he, would take the tongs and turn 'em around before the blaze so that they would parch. Night after night he would do this same thing until they had parched enough, then he would beat all of it together and make a powder; then put it up in little bags. My daddy wuz afraid ter ask old uncle Ned what he did with these bags, but heard he conjured folks with ...
— Slave Narratives: A Folk History of Slavery in the United States From Interviews with Former Slaves - Georgia Narratives, Part 4 • Works Projects Administration

... Veia, by pity unrestrain'd, With pick-axe hastes the ground to tear, And toil'd till sweat she panting rain'd, That the poor wretch imburied there Might slowly die, in sight of food Renew'd each day, his head so far Extant from earth, as from the flood The heads of swimmers extant are; That the parch'd marrow and the dry Liver for a love-draught might be, When fixt upon the feast the eye, The craving eye should cease to see. All Naples says in verity, And all the neighbouring towns beside, That Folia lewd of Rimini Was present there, that dreadful tide— She ...
— Targum • George Borrow

... to us every Saturday night. If you had two in the family, they 'lowanced you one-half gallon 'lasses and 12 to 15 pounds bacon and a peck of meal. We have to take the meal and parch it and make coffee out of it. We had our flours. One of them we called biscuit flour and we called it 'shorts.' We had rye and wheat and ...
— Slave Narratives: a Folk History of Slavery in the United States From Interviews with Former Slaves - Texas Narratives, Part 1 • Works Projects Administration

... knots, and sashes with which her uniform was rendered so gay and so distinctive fluttering behind her; and her little military boots, with the bright spurs twinkling, flying over the earth too lightly for a speck of dust,—though it lay thick as August suns could parch it,—to rest upon her. Thus she went now, along the lovely moonlight; singing her drinking song so fast and so loud that, had it been any other than this young fire-eater of the African squadrons, it might have been supposed she sang out of fear ...
— Under Two Flags • Ouida [Louise de la Ramee]

... dessicator. [device to render dry] dessicator; hair drier, clothes drier, gas drier, electric drier; vacuum oven, drying oven, kiln; lyophilizer. clothesline. V. be dry &c adj.. render dry &c adj.; dry; dry up, soak up; sponge, swab, wipe; drain. desiccate, dehydrate, exsiccate^; parch. kiln dry; vacuum dry, blow dry, oven dry; hang out to dry. mummify. be fine, hold up. Adj. dry, anhydrous, arid; adust^, arescent^; dried &c v.; undamped; juiceless^, sapless; sear; husky; rainless, without rain, fine; dry as a bone, dry as dust, dry as a stick, ...
— Roget's Thesaurus of English Words and Phrases: Body • Roget

... sun doth parch the green, Or where his beams do not dissolve the ice, In temperate heat where he is felt and seen, In presence pressed of people mad or wise, Set me in high, or yet in low degree, In longest night, or in the shortest day, In clearest ...
— Tudor and Stuart Love Songs • Various

... the weary traveller tempest-tost To reach secure at length his native coast, Who wandering long o'er distant lands has sped, The night-blast wildly howling round his head, Known all the woes of want, and felt the storm Of the bleak winter parch his shivering form; The journey o'er and every peril past Beholds his little cottage-home at last, And as he sees afar the smoke curl slow, Feels his full eyes with transport overflow: So from the scene where Death and Anguish reign, And Vice and Folly drench ...
— Poems • Robert Southey

... summer, about three years after they became orphans, that rain had been for a while withheld from the earth, the hillsides began to parch, the grass in the vales to wither, and the stream of Corrie was diminished between its banks to the size of an ordinary rill. The shepherds drove their flocks to moorlands, and marsh and tarn had their reeds invaded ...
— Folk-Lore and Legends - Scotland • Anonymous

... a drought To parch the fields forlorn, The rain to flood the meadows with mud, The blight to blast the corn, To Him I leave to guide The bolt in its crooked path, To strike the miser's rick, and show The skies blood-red ...
— The Poetical Works of Thomas Hood • Thomas Hood

... vain, And, beat from thence, have lighted there again. About her neck hung chains of pebble-stone, Which, lighten'd by her neck, like diamonds shone. She ware no gloves; for neither sun nor wind Would burn or parch her hands, but, to her mind. Or warm or cool them, for they took delight To play upon those hands, they were so white. 30 Buskins of shells, all silver'd, used she, And branch'd with blushing coral to the knee; Where sparrows perch'd of hollow ...
— The Works of Christopher Marlowe, Vol. 3 (of 3) • Christopher Marlowe

... their wholesomeness, the vines of the Ile de France or vins francais, which agree, he says, with scholars, invalids, the bourgeois, and all other persons who do not devote themselves to manual labour; for they do not parch the blood, like the wines of Gascony, nor fly to the head like those of Orleans and Chateau-Thierry; nor do they cause obstructions like those of Bordeaux." This is also the opinion of Baccius, who in his Latin treatise on the natural ...
— Manners, Custom and Dress During the Middle Ages and During the Renaissance Period • Paul Lacroix

... seemed to be an immense river. There they anchored among islands. They found that the volume of water brought down by this river was so great that it freshened the sea-water even three miles out. They went up the river a little way to try to get fuel to parch their corn, half a handful of raw corn being the entire ration for a day. The current and a strong north wind, however, drove them back. When they sounded, a mile and a half from shore, a line of thirty ...
— Days of the Discoverers • L. Lamprey

... spoil our mart with her gittern? Hast thou not taught her the spells to win love from the noble and young? Ho, how daintily the young witch robes herself! Ho, laces and satins, and we shiver with the cold, and parch with the heat—and—doff thy ...
— The Last Of The Barons, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... Bah! repay me in the other world—below, with a drop of cold water when I parch!" And with a dulcet yet demoniacal laugh, the singular creature pushed him into a lightless lobby, slammed a door and seemed to run away, singing the refrain of the waltz which ...
— The Son of Clemenceau • Alexandre (fils) Dumas

... blooming in great abundance. The Indians of the Missouri, and more especially those who do not cultivate maize, make great use of the seed of this plant for bread or in thickening their soup. They first parch and then pound it between two stones until it is reduced to a fine meal. Sometimes they add a portion of water, and drink it thus diluted: at other times they add a sufficient proportion of marrow grease to reduce it to the consistency of common dough and eat it in that ...
— History of the Expedition under the Command of Captains Lewis and Clark, Vol. I. • Meriwether Lewis and William Clark

... in endless balance sway; Day follows night and night succeeds the day; And so the powers of good and evil may Work out the purpose that his wisdom planned. Eternal day would parch the dewy mould, Eternal night would freeze the lands with cold; But wise was God who planned the world of old; I rest in Him for ...
— The Advance of English Poetry in the Twentieth Century • William Lyon Phelps

... Before it stretch and flutteringly unfold Its rumpled webs of amethyst-freaked, diaphanous gold. And what hard task abstracts me from delight, Filling with hopeless hope and dear despair The still-born day and parch-ed fields of night, That my old way of song, no longer fair, For lack of serene care, Is grown a stony and a weed-choked plot, Thou only know'st aright, Thou only know'st, for I know not. How many songs must die that ...
— New Poems • Francis Thompson

... passionate women, look'd down O'er the dim world whose sole tender light was their own, When Matilda, alone, from her chamber descended, And enter'd the garden, unseen, unattended. Her forehead was aching and parch'd, and her breast By a vague inexpressible sadness oppress'd: A sadness which led her, she scarcely knew how, And she scarcely knew why... (save, indeed, that just now The house, out of which with a gasp she had fled Half stifled, seem'd ready to sink on her head)... Out into the night air, the silence, ...
— Lucile • Owen Meredith

... determined, and she shall have her members torne and gnawn with wild beasts, when as she is bitten and rent with wormes, shee shall endure the paine of the fire, when as the broyling heat of the Sunne shall scortch and parch the belly of the Asse, shee shall abide the gallows when the Dogs and Vultures shall have the guts of her body hanging in their ravenous mouthes. I pray you number all the torments which she shall suffer: First ...
— The Golden Asse • Lucius Apuleius

... and said, "You also who forgot your mother in the midst of your selfish pleasures-hear your doom. You shall always blow in the hot, dry weather, and shall parch and shrivel all living things. And men shall detest and avoid you from ...
— The Junior Classics, Volume 1 • Willam Patten

... faulty punctuation obscures the text. Carefully compare the following: Tac. and Tor. Spondylos teres, cuminum, etc. Hum., List. and G.-V. S. teres cuminum, i.e. crush the cumin. Sch. S. tores—dry, parch! ...
— Cooking and Dining in Imperial Rome • Apicius

... and clear, strowing the remainder of the sugar on as they boil, skim them clear, and lay them in glasses or pots single, with some syrrup, cover them with double refin'd sugar, set them in a stove, and when they are crisp on one side turn the other on glasses and parch them, then set them into the stove again; when they are pretty dry, pour them on hair-sieves till they are dry ...
— English Housewifery Exemplified - In above Four Hundred and Fifty Receipts Giving Directions - for most Parts of Cookery • Elizabeth Moxon

... pleasure, and this, half the time, with a temptation to go wrong that could no more be seen by themselves, than the stream that runs in the next valley can be seen by us through yonder mountain', though any looker on might have discovered it as plainly as we can discover the parch that are swimming around ...
— The Deerslayer • James Fenimore Cooper

... rags, hard work, contempt, suspicion, unjust reproach, are disagreeable, but debt is infinitely worse than them all. Never run into debt! Avoid pecuniary obligation as you would pestilence or famine. If you have but fifty cents and can get no more a week, buy a peck of corn, parch it, and live on it, rather than owe ...
— Life and Conduct • J. Cameron Lees

... Thrice Neptune ventur'd to upraise his arms Grim frowning,—thrice the flames too fierce he found, And shrunk beneath the waters. Earth at length, (By streams and founts encircled,—for her womb Trembling they sought for refuge) rais'd on high Her face omniferous, dry and parch'd with heat; Her burning forehead shaded with her hand; Shook all with tremor huge; then shrank for shade Beneath, and gasping, ...
— The Metamorphoses of Publius Ovidus Naso in English blank verse Vols. I & II • Ovid

... water-bags, the guns and food on to the one camel and dragged themselves away on foot, driving the spent beast. Obviously this camel could not go far. Blindness had stricken it, and its black lips were retracted with the parch of thirst. ...
— The Flying Legion • George Allan England

... began to make acquaintance with the Antipodean trees and flowers. I hope you will not think it a very sweeping assertion if I say that all the leaves look as if they were made of leather, but it really is so; the hot winds appear to parch up everything, at all events, round Melbourne, till the greatest charm of foliage is more or less lost; the flowers also look withered and burnt up, as yours do at the end of a long, dry summer, only they assume this ...
— Station Life in New Zealand • Lady Barker

... being children, then. Let us sit down upon the rug, parch corn, crack nuts, roast apples, and be merry in spite of wind ...
— Moods • Louisa May Alcott

... "Thrice, with parch'd lips, her guiltless babes she press'd, And thrice she clasp'd them to her tortured breast. Awhile with white uplifted eyes she stood, Then plunged her trembling poniards in their blood. Go, kiss your sire! go, share the bridal mirth! She cried, and hurl'd their quiv'ring limbs ...
— Tales And Novels, Volume 1 • Maria Edgeworth



Words linked to "Parch" :   sear, dry, dry out



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