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Lave   /leɪv/   Listen
Lave

verb
(past & past part. laved; pres. part. laving)
1.
Wash or flow against.  Synonyms: lap, wash.
2.
Cleanse (one's body) with soap and water.  Synonym: wash.
3.
Wash one's face and hands.  Synonym: wash up.






WordNet 3.0 © 2010 Princeton University








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"Lave" Quotes from Famous Books



... him yet, dear cousin Zoe," Arthur said in a low, moved tone. "I lave found no external injury, and it may be that he ...
— Elsie's Kith and Kin • Martha Finley

... afflicted in the same way. It did do good, and his brave patience made us remember him long after he was gone. He thought I had been kind to him, and said to a fellow-student of mine, 'Tell the Doctor I lave him me bones, for I've nothing else in the wide world, and I'll nos be wanting 'em at all, at all, when the great pain hat kilt me entirely.' So that is how they came to be mine, and why I've kept them carefully, for, ...
— Eight Cousins • Louisa M. Alcott

... where fishes glide, And timid fowl their plumage lave, Where drooping willows by its side, ...
— Canada and Other Poems • T.F. Young

... "Will I lave you, Peter! not if I can help it, my boy; but they won't leave you, never fear them; prisoners are so scarce with them, that they would not leave the captain's ...
— Peter Simple and The Three Cutters, Vol. 1-2 • Frederick Marryat

... but they entertained, moreover, a special regard for this beautiful island, which is justly considered one of the finest in the whole extent of the Mississippi. It is fertile, and produces many varieties of nuts and fruits, and being in the rapids of the stream, the waters which lave its shores, yield an abundance of excellent fish. In addition to all this, they have a traditionary belief, that the island was the favorite residence of a good spirit which dwelt in a cave in the rocks on which Fort Armstrong now stands. This spirit had often been seen ...
— Great Indian Chief of the West - Or, Life and Adventures of Black Hawk • Benjamin Drake

... days, but tuk et out o' nights, I've heerd, for 'twudn' shut when he slep', but used to scare ould Deb'rah Mennear fairly out of her sken o' moonshiny nights, when the light comed in 'pon et. An' even when her got 'n to lave et off, her used allays to put a tay-cup 'pon top o't ...
— The Astonishing History of Troy Town • Sir Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch

... little man no bigger than a big forked radish, an' as green as a cabbidge. Me a'nt had one in her house down in Connaught in the ould days. O musha! musha! the ould days, the ould days! Now, you may b'lave me or b'lave me not, but you could have put him in your pocket, and the grass-green head of him wouldn't more than'v stuck out. She kept him in a cupboard, and out of the cupboard he'd pop if it was a crack open, ...
— The Blue Lagoon - A Romance • H. de Vere Stacpoole

... wandering onward to the boundless West— But thou art given by the good All-giver, Blessing a land to be in turn most blest:[2] While, like a leaf-borne insect, floating by, Chanceful and changeful is my destiny; I needs must follow where thy currents lave— Perchance to find a home, ...
— The Emigrant - or Reflections While Descending the Ohio • Frederick William Thomas

... long but the wanst; an', so help me, young man, I was lookin' at the shteam gauge whin he shtarted that prolonged blast—an' whin he finished the gauge had dhropped tin pounds! So up I go on the bridge to the ould man, an' says I to him, says I: 'Clear weather or thick fog, I'm tellin' ye to lave that whistle alone if ye expect to finish the voyage. Wan toot out av it means a ton av coal gone to hell an' a dhrop av blood out av the owner's heart! An' from that time on the best I iver hearrd out av that whistle was a sick sort av ...
— Cappy Ricks • Peter B. Kyne

... I at last! weary am I! Shall the old eons bring me no repose? Oh, in long-promised slumbers once to lie And feel the films of sleep mine eyelids close! Oh, once to lave my burning head in Night— Blest Night! my planets joy thee—every one! Perish, fatigueless Fire! and thou, O Light! Vanish. Go leave your emperor, your Sun! For I am done with blessings scattered wide Throughout the waste, oppressive Universe, And yonder fading Earth-globe, ...
— The Masque of the Elements • Herman Scheffauer

... a brush wid him, mesilf. Con Murphy takes a hand in this game. We nade no lawyer-body—not yit. Lave it to me, Miss Ruthie, acushla! Sure I'll invite mesilf to supper wid youse, too. I'll come wid Neale, and he shall be prepared beforehand. Be sure he comes here first. Never weep a tear, me dear. ...
— The Corner House Girls at School • Grace Brooks Hill

... downward by her dying doves; Vulcan, spun on a wheel, shall track The circle of the zodiac; Silver Artemis be lost, To the polar blizzards tossed; Heaven shall curdle as with blood; The sun be swallowed in the flood; The universe be silent save For the low drone of winds that lave The shadowed great world's ashen sides As through the rustling void she glides. Then shall there be a whisper heard Of the Grave's Secret and its Word, Where in black silence none shall cry Save those who, dead-affrighted, spy How from the murmurous graveyards creep The ...
— Georgian Poetry 1916-17 • Various

... around him upon the inestimable boon of religious liberty which, he might say, was planted upon the rock of Plymouth, and blazed until it had marched all over the land, dispensing from its vivifying wings the healing dew of charity, like the briny tears that lave ...
— Trumps • George William Curtis

... bite to ate while we may, as th' ass said when he passed th' market car, for who knows what'll happen if we stop to ask by your lave?" ...
— The Iron Game - A Tale of the War • Henry Francis Keenan

... ithers. If 'twas chickun, I'll warrant now—we're all glad to make a bit of chickun go furrther with other things—but a grreat turrkey like this wan—Give it to thim sthrait, Misther Brown, an' that's my advoice. Ye can take it or lave it." ...
— The Brown Study • Grace S. Richmond

... said—and it's meself heard him—that you was to lave your papa at home in owld England, and that when ye came into these savage parts of the wide world, it was ...
— Off to the Wilds - Being the Adventures of Two Brothers • George Manville Fenn

... skies Through sunny air. Add too, the sweetness Of thy honied voice; the neatness Of thine ankle lightly turn'd: With those beauties, scarce discrn'd, Kept with such sweet privacy, That they seldom meet the eye Of the little loves that fly Round about with eager pry. Saving when, with freshening lave, Thou dipp'st them in the taintless wave; Like twin water lillies, born In the coolness of the morn. O, if thou hadst breathed then, Now the Muses had been ten. Couldst thou wish for lineage higher Than ...
— Poems 1817 • John Keats

... he told Nicht Nought Nothing that there was a loch seven miles long, and seven miles deep, and seven miles broad, and he must drain it the next day, or else he would have him for his supper. Nicht Nought Nothing began early next morning and tried to lave the water with his pail, but the loch was never getting any less, and he did no ken what to do; but the giant's dochter called on all the fish in the sea to come and drink the water, and very soon they drank it dry. When the giant saw the work done he was in a rage, and said, ...
— Custom and Myth • Andrew Lang

... rade in the rain, in the days that are gane, In the rain and the wind and the lave; They shoutit in the ha' and they routit on the hill, But they're a' quaitit ...
— Stories of the Border Marches • John Lang and Jean Lang

... is it Biddy Malone ye dare to be callin' names? Lave this, or I'll shy your lean carcass over the ...
— Innocents abroad • Mark Twain

... chastity. Come clad in white, And lave your palms at some clear fountain's brim! Then watch the mild lamb at the altar bright, ...
— The Elegies of Tibullus • Tibullus

... instructed in saggarting till they had made me fit to cut a decent figure in Ireland. We had a long and tedious voyage, Shorsha; not so tedious, however, as it would have been had I been fool enough to lave your pack of cards behind me, as the thaif, my brother Denis, wanted to persuade me to do, in order that he might play with them himself. With the cards I managed to have many a nice game with the sailors, winning from them ha'pennies and sixpences until the captain said that I was ruining ...
— The Romany Rye - A Sequel to 'Lavengro' • George Borrow

... Ma'am," Mike besought Mrs. Porter; "come out av the room an' lave the docthor bring the boss 'round." He signaled to Cynthia with his eyes for help in ...
— Thoroughbreds • W. A. Fraser

... says anxious, "ye won't be shtirrin' oop the Kid. He ain't been into anything rampageous, nor the women, nor the drink, nor clawin' to do nothin', since we coom, and me gettin' fat with the pacefulness of it. Lave him aisy for the ...
— The Belted Seas • Arthur Colton

... speaks sae sweetly Whene'er we meet alane, I wish nae mair to lay my care, I wish nae mair of a' that's rare: My Peggy speaks sae sweetly, To a' the lave I'm cauld, But she gars a' my spirits glow At ...
— English Poets of the Eighteenth Century • Selected and Edited with an Introduction by Ernest Bernbaum

... to dight that tear, And go wi' me and be my dear, And then your every care and fear May whistle owre the lave o't. ...
— The Complete Works of Robert Burns: Containing his Poems, Songs, and Correspondence. • Robert Burns and Allan Cunningham

... sorry I am to say it to ye, sur," he began, "but it's the handlin' of this stun that's desthroyin' me touch at the brick-makin', and it's better I should lave ye and find worruk at me own thrade. For it's worruk I am nadin'. It isn't meself, Captain, to ate the bread of oidleness here. And so good-by to ye, and if it's fifty cints ye can be givin' me ontil I'll find a kill—it's God ...
— Drift from Two Shores • Bret Harte

... about you,' says I, quite grateful—and we took a strong cup on the strength of it—and depinding on him, I thought all safe; and what d'ye think, my lady? Why, himself stalks into the place—talked the squire over, to be sure—and without so much as "by your lave," sates himself and his new wife on the lase in the house; and I may go whistle.' 'It was a great pity, Shane, that you did not go yourself to Mr. Churn.' 'That's a true word for you, ma'am dear; but it's hard if a poor man can't have a ...
— Anecdotes for Boys • Harvey Newcomb

... around like a rat in a corn-popper. One day, as I was chasing time over our worst division, holding on to the arm-rest and watching to see if the main frame touched the driving-boxes as she rolled, Dennis Rafferty punched me in the small of the back, and said: "Jahn, for the love ave the Vargin, lave up on her a minit. Oi does be chasing that dure for the lasth twinty minits, and dang the wan'st has I hit it fair. She's the divil on ...
— Danger Signals • John A. Hill and Jasper Ewing Brady

... not cut our throats, hating the sight of blood and rating our skins a hantle higher nor our lives; and as for hanging, while she is a fixing of the nail and a making of the noose she has time t' alter her mind. But a jump into a canal is no more than into bed; and the water it does all the lave, will ye, nill ye. Why, look at me, the mother o' nine, wasn't I agog to make a hole in our ...
— The Cloister and the Hearth • Charles Reade

... worsted. These were the initials of Alison Graeme, and James may have looked in at her from without—himself unseen but not unthought of—when he was "wat, wat, and weary," and, after having walked many a mile over the hills, may have seen her sitting, while "a' the lave were sleepin'," and by the firelight working her name on the blankets for her ain ...
— Rab and His Friends • John Brown, M. D.

... dozen chance blows," replied the other; "you know he knocked you down as fast as ever you got up—I lave it to the ...
— Willy Reilly - The Works of William Carleton, Volume One • William Carleton

... Dick, be holdin' the end of this bit of string till I get the stitches in behint. Does that hang comfortable? well, an' you're the trouble an' all. How's THAT? That's aisier, is it? Lift your fut till I see if it comes to your knees. Now off with it, and lave me alone till I ...
— The Blue Lagoon - A Romance • H. de Vere Stacpoole

... Rogers—took my knife away also. "Very well. Now, captin dear, ye may get upon your feet; but—understand me—av ye attimpts to lay hands upon either ov us, the other'll shoot ye through the head widout waitin' to say, 'By your lave.' Arrah, now, it's kilt he is, I do belave!" as the fellow rose from my prostrate body and saw that I made no movement—for all this time he had kept so tight a hold upon my throat that he fairly strangled me, ...
— The Cruise of the "Esmeralda" • Harry Collingwood

... know the throb and thrill of new life, and experience the swing and sweep of spiritual impulses. He makes them to know that the man who aspires recks not of cold, of storm, or of snow, if only he may reach the summit and lave his soul in the glory that crowns the marriage of earth and sky. They feel that the aspirant is but yielding obedience to the behests of his better self to scale the heights ...
— The Vitalized School • Francis B. Pearson

... 1868.—On inquiring of men who lave seen the underground houses in Rua, I find that they are very extensive, ranging along mountain sides for twenty miles, and in one part a rivulet flows inside. In some cases the doorways are level ...
— The Last Journals of David Livingstone, in Central Africa, from 1865 to His Death, Volume I (of 2), 1866-1868 • David Livingstone

... mind of a story," came from Shadow. "An old Irishman was dying and wanted to make his will. 'How do ye want to lave yer money, Pat' asked his friend. 'Sure,' says Pat; 'I want to lave it all to me woif an' me four childer, equal loike, so ...
— Dave Porter and His Rivals - or, The Chums and Foes of Oak Hall • Edward Stratemeyer

... Lave Britain alone; if she won't pay, mavrone, She's puttin' her head into debt. If I know the books, the way the thing looks, She'll pay us, wid intherest, yet! Ay, faith he did say, so wise in his day— That noble ould Graycian, PHILANDER— That sauce for ...
— Punchinello, Vol. 1, No. 2, April 9, 1870 • Various

... pulling it right down to the floor, and ye wouldn't believe the way we worked, setting out the dishes, and the flowers and the swatemates on the table. 'Now,' says I, 'for the love of God let none of them sit down at the table, or they'll feel the waiters with their feet. Lave it to me to get His Excellency out of this, and then hurry the drunk waiters away!' And I spoke a word to the boys in the pantry. 'Boys,' says I, 'as ye value your salvation, keep up a great clatteration here by dropping the spoons and ...
— The Days Before Yesterday • Lord Frederick Hamilton

... leetle too clevaire," said the maid with an evil leer,—"she would rob Madame, would she? She would play the espionne, hein? Eh bien, ma petite, you stay 'ere ontil you say what you lave done ...
— Okewood of the Secret Service • Valentine Williams

... "I'd lave it at wanst," he said, "if I wern't deteened here by the cleems of jewty. But I foind it dull beyond all exprission. Me only occupeetion is to walk about the sthraits and throy to preserve the attichood of shuparior baying, But I'm getting overwarrun an' toired out, an' I'm longing for the toime ...
— The Lady of the Ice - A Novel • James De Mille

... honour, let us lave Your feet and bind your wounds on bended knee. Though coward hands have nailed you to the tree And shed your innocent blood and dug your grave, Rejoice and live! Your oriflamme shall wave— While man has power to perish and be free— A golden flame of holiest ...
— A Treasury of War Poetry - British and American Poems of the World War 1914-1917 • Edited, with Introduction and Notes, by George Herbert Clarke

... that law, Which was ordain'd me, when I issued thence. Not so, if Dame from heaven, as thou sayst, Moves and directs thee; then no flattery needs. Enough for me that in her name thou ask. Go therefore now: and with a slender reed See that thou duly gird him, and his face Lave, till all sordid stain thou wipe from thence. For not with eye, by any cloud obscur'd, Would it be seemly before him to come, Who stands the foremost minister in heaven. This islet all around, there far beneath, Where the wave beats it, on the oozy bed Produces store of ...
— The Divine Comedy, Complete - The Vision of Paradise, Purgatory and Hell • Dante Alighieri

... tree growth. The Indian loves the brotherhood of trees. Trees grow in that desolate landscape only on the borders of streams. Toward the water and welcome shade they hasten. Tired beast and tired man lave in the lifegiving flood. The horses wade in it as though the snows had melted and run thither to caress and refresh them. Oh, the exhilaration of water! On the margin of the far banks the camp is made for the night. There is witchery in a Western night. Myriads ...
— The Vanishing Race • Dr. Joseph Kossuth Dixon

... Samoa book can only increase that - I can't help it, that book is not written for me but for Miss Manners; but I mean to break that frost inside two years, and pull off a big success, and Vanity whispers in my ear that I have the strength. If I haven't, whistle ower the lave o't! I can do without glory and perhaps the time is not far off when I can do without corn. It is a time coming soon enough, anyway; and I have endured some two and forty years without public shame, ...
— Vailima Letters • Robert Louis Stevenson

... to leave off riding them, and you may thus turn to account many spare moments. In the lovely meadows of the Meuse; along the historic banks of the scenic Rhine; where the warm waters of the Mediterranean lave the mountainous coast of sunny Italy; in the fertile lowlands of Belgium; or out where the Alps rear their snowy summits, we felt ourselves less alien when we could detect kinship ...
— See America First • Orville O. Hiestand

... Me friends can't lave me house an' naither boite nor sup; turn yer backs an' ye plaze, till Oi get on me skirt.' An' whin Oi wuz up an' dacint an' tould them they could luk, Oi sez, 'It's the foinest Lung balm in the land ye shall taste,' ...
— Two Little Savages • Ernest Thompson Seton

... lordly Hudson part contending powers, And broad Potomac lave two hostile shores? Must Alleghany's sacred summits bear The impious bulwarks of perpetual war? His hundred streams receive your heroes slain, And bear your sons ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 15, No. 88, February, 1865 • Various

... the sea fencibles, and the land fencibles, and the volunteers and yeomanry, are on fit, and driving to Fairport as hard as horse and man can gangand auld Mucklebackit's gane wi' the lavemuckle gude he'll do!Hech, sirs!he'll be missed the morn wha wad hae served king and ...
— The Antiquary, Complete • Sir Walter Scott

... a custom amo' the fishers. There's some gey puir fowk amon' 's, ye see, an' when a twa o' them merries, the lave o' 's wants to gie them a bit o' a start like. Sae we a' gang to the weddin' an' eats an' drinks plenty, an' pays for a' 'at we hae; and they mak' a guid profit out o' 't, for the things doesna cost them nearhan' ...
— Malcolm • George MacDonald

... certain, and easily obtained. I leave those which I am told arise from patient study, length of time, and severe application, to the fools who think time given to be so wasted. Roses grow for me to gather: rivers roll for me to lave in. Let the slave dig the mine, but for me let the diamond sparkle. Let the lamb, the dove, and the life-loving eel writhe and die; it shall not disturb me, while I enjoy the viands. The five senses are my deities; to them I pay worship and adoration, and never yet have ...
— Anna St. Ives • Thomas Holcroft

... greater when he found that his enemy was offering him his arm, and ended by helping him down the remainder of the way to the river, where the injured lad gladly seated himself at the edge upon a stone, which enabled him to lave both feet at once in the clear cool current, to the great comfort and ...
— The Black Tor - A Tale of the Reign of James the First • George Manville Fenn

... belave, Colonel," said the dry person, again, "that thim ribals'll lave us a chance to catch them. Be me sowl! I'm jist wishin to war-rum me hands ...
— Campaigns of a Non-Combatant, - and His Romaunt Abroad During the War • George Alfred Townsend

... where fair Isis rolls her purer wave, The partial muse delighted loves to lave; On her green banks a greener wreath she wove, To crown the bards that haunt her classic grove; Where Richards[428] wakes a genuine poet's fires, And modern Britons glory in ...
— A Budget of Paradoxes, Volume II (of II) • Augustus de Morgan

... sunning herself. "What is the name of this village?" I asked. "It is Mejdel," was her reply. This was the ancient Magdala, the home of that beautiful but sinful Magdalene, whose repentance has made her one of the brightest of the Saints. The crystal waters of the lake here lave a shore of the cleanest pebbles. The path goes winding through oleanders, nebbuks, patches of hollyhock, anise-seed, fennel, and other spicy plants, while, on the west, great fields of barley stand ripe for the cutting. In some places, the Fellahs, men and women, were at work, ...
— The Lands of the Saracen - Pictures of Palestine, Asia Minor, Sicily, and Spain • Bayard Taylor

... Banner, for 'tis weary; Round its staff 'tis drooping dreary; Furl it, fold it—it is best; For there's not a man to wave it, And there's not a sword to save it, And there's not one left to lave it In the blood which heroes gave it; And its foes now scorn and brave it; Furl ...
— How the Flag Became Old Glory • Emma Look Scott

... Bridget, in a loud whisper, "would ye be havin' th' milkman lave wan or two quarts ...
— The Cheerful Smugglers • Ellis Parker Butler

... her voice, "Ah, don't 'ee listen to he, maister. 'Twas he that let mun go weeks agone, and there's been nothing but bad work for us all since then. He's so bad as any o' mun; 'twas he that let mun take her Ladyship's childer; and we'm not going to be plagued with witches no more. Lave the witches to us. We knows ...
— The Drummer's Coat • J. W. Fortescue

... death," and he has exprest the humanist view of mortality in a hymn which his admirers regard as the high-water mark of modern poetry. But will this rhapsody bear thinking about? Is death "delicate, lovely and soothing," "delicious," coming to us with "serenades"? Does death "lave us in a flood of bliss"? Does "the body gratefully nestle close to death"? Do we go forth to meet death "with dances and chants of fullest welcome"? It is vain to attempt to hide the direst fact of all under plausible metaphors and rhetorical artifice. It is in ...
— The world's great sermons, Volume 8 - Talmage to Knox Little • Grenville Kleiser

... that these carefully kept monuments were our own. The masses of the working-people of Scotland have read history, and are no revolutionary levelers. They rejoice in the memories of "Wallace and Bruce and a' the lave," who are still much revered as the former champions of freedom. And while foreigners imagine that we want the spirit only to overturn capitalists and aristocracy, we are content to respect our laws till we can change them, and ...
— Missionary Travels and Researches in South Africa - Journeys and Researches in South Africa • David Livingstone

... morning," said the Highlander, "and I've tell't him mair than I've tell't you. And he's jest directed me to put my sinful trust in the Father of us a'. I've sinned heaviest against Him, laddie, but His love is stronger than the lave." ...
— Tales from Many Sources - Vol. V • Various

... parcel of beggarly thievish blackguards. So your honour was edicated in Munster—I mane partly edicated. I suppose by your saying that you were partly edicated, that your honour was intended for the clerical profession, but being over fond of the drop was forced to lave college before your edication was quite completed, and so for want of a better profession took up with that of merchandise. Ah, the love of the drop at college has prevented many a clever young fellow from taking holy orders. Well, it's a pity but it can't be helped. I am fond of a drop ...
— Wild Wales - Its People, Language and Scenery • George Borrow

... if it fits too tight, take the knife to it. Only give me the word, an' I'll engage Eily O'Connor will never trouble you any more. Don't ax me any questions; only, if you are agreeable, take off that glove an' give it to me for a token. Lave the rest to Danny." ...
— The World's Greatest Books, Volume V. • Arthur Mee and J.A. Hammerton, Eds.

... cooling: would, holy Father, that it could penetrate to a deeper malady than the ills of flesh; that it could assuage the fever of the heart, or lave from the wearied mind the dust which it gathers from the mire and travail ...
— Devereux, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... the end, the journey is very long—and naked truth is hid among the rocks.... Will she come forth?... I see her gestures in your eyes already, and her cool breath will lave my visage soon.... Ah!... Alladine! Alladine!...[He releases her suddenly.] I heard your bones cry out like little children.... I have not hurt you?... Do not stay thus, upon your knees before me,... It is I who go ...
— Pelleas and Melisande • Maurice Maeterlinck

... Roystering dogs! Stout hearts! Where are they now, those fine lads in corslet and morgensterne, who played havoc with the casks in the Regenwalde cellar? Some of them died of the pest in Schiefelbein, four of them fell under old Jock Hepburn at Frankfort, the lave went wandering about the world, kissing and drinking, no doubt, and lying and sorrowing and dying, and never again will we foregather in a vacant house in foreign parts! For that is the hardship of life, that it's ever a flux and change. We are here to-day and away to-morrow, ...
— John Splendid - The Tale of a Poor Gentleman, and the Little Wars of Lorn • Neil Munro

... that it's the practice in Beartown wid some of them as has lots of money to lave the same wid the leddy? Thim chaps are prying round and it would be aisy fur 'em to ...
— The Launch Boys' Adventures in Northern Waters • Edward S. Ellis

... sa montagne est un sainct lieu: Qui viendra done au mont de Dieu? Qui est-ce qui la tiendra place? Le homine de mains et coeur lave, En vanite non esleve Et ...
— Sabbath in Puritan New England • Alice Morse Earle

... giblet pie—such a whack of pies do try a man, to be sure. Likewise junkets an' heavy cake be a responsibility, for if not eaten quick, they perish. But let it be mine to pass my days with a cheek o' pork like the present instance. Ruby, my dear, the young man here wants to lave us." ...
— I Saw Three Ships and Other Winter Tales • Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch

... triste, il s'ecrie: —Roncevaux! Roncevaux! o traitre Ganelon! Car son neveu Roland est mort dans ce vallon Avec les douze pairs et toute son armee. Le laboureur des monts qui vit sous la ramee Est rentre chez lui, grave et calme, avec son chien; Il a baise sa femme au front et dit: C'est bien. Il a lave sa trompe et son arc aux fontaines; Et les os des heros blanchissent dans les plaines. Le bon roi Charle est plein de douleur et d'ennui; Son cheval syrien est triste comme lui. Il pleure; l'empereur pleure de la souffrance D'avoir perdu ses preux, ses douze pairs ...
— La Legende des Siecles • Victor Hugo

... the masthur, thank God, an' if you say so, it must be done. But Joe Reynolds is not that bad either: he was sayin' tho' at Mrs. Mulready's that he expected little from yer honor, but just leave to go where he liked, and lave the cow and ...
— The Macdermots of Ballycloran • Anthony Trollope

... more serene Win to the brow, 'tis his; and if ye trace Along the margin a more eloquent green, If on the heart, the freshness of the scene Sprinkle its coolness, and from the dry dust Of weary life a moment lave it clean With nature's baptism,—'tis to him ye must Pay orisons for this suspension ...
— A Love Story • A Bushman

... "By your lave," said Ted suddenly, "it sames to me that it's time for Ted Flaggan to look after his owld bones. I'm ...
— The Pirate City - An Algerine Tale • R.M. Ballantyne

... thee, meandering, yet wafted back From distant hearth and lonely bivouac, From strange vicissitudes in other lands, From half-wrought labors and unfinished plans I come, in thy cool depths my brow to lave, And rest a moment by ...
— Poems - Vol. IV • Hattie Howard

... heart-throb of warning drew me back; I thought of Asur instinctively, and thinking of him his image flashed on me. He moved as if in trance through the glassy waves of those cosmic waters which everywhere lave and permeate the worlds, and in which our earth is but a subaqueous mound. His head was bowed, his form dilated to heroic stature, as if he conceived of himself as some great thing or as moving to some high destiny; and this shadow ...
— AE in the Irish Theosophist • George William Russell

... io ti perdon: perdona Tu ancora: al corpo no, che nulla pave; All'alma si: deh! per lei prega; e dona Battesmo a me ch'ogni mia colpa lave. In queste voci languide risuona Un non so che di flebile e soave Ch'al cor gli serpe, ed ogni sdegno ammorza, E gli occhi a lagrimar gl'invoglia e ...
— Renaissance in Italy, Volumes 1 and 2 - The Catholic Reaction • John Addington Symonds

... not been thrown away on his attentive listener. She opened every door in the room, "by your lave," as she said. She looked all over the walls to see if there was any old stovepipe hole or other avenue to eye or ear. Then she went, in her excess of caution, to the window. She saw nothing noteworthy except Mr. Gifted Hopkins and the charge he convoyed, large and small, in the distance. ...
— The Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table • Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr. (The Physician and Poet not the Jurist)

... 'tisn't thy work. Thou wert always good at thy work, praise God. Thou'rt thy father's own son for that. But thou dostn't keep about like, and take thy place wi' the lave on 'em since Christmas. Thou look'st hagged at times, and folk'll see't, and ...
— Tom Brown at Oxford • Thomas Hughes

... until he came to a spring of clear, bubbling water, known to the people around as the "Fairy Well." Here Count Otto dismounted. He bent over the spring and began to lave his hands in the sparkling tide, but to his wonder he found that though the weather was cold and frosty, the water was warm and delightfully caressing. He felt a glow of joy pass through his veins, and, as he plunged his hands deeper, he fancied that his right hand was grasped by another, ...
— Good Stories For Great Holidays - Arranged for Story-Telling and Reading Aloud and for the - Children's Own Reading • Frances Jenkins Olcott

... he had called Daniel Cullinan, as again the wail rang down from the hills. "Catch the bird can talk like yondhar, and I give ye lave to eat him and me off the same dish. And if 'tis a man, and he's anywhere but on the road, here's a rare bottle of hay we'll search through for him. Rest aisy now, Corp'ril, and give it up. That man with the mules, we'll say, was a liar; and turn ...
— Two Sides of the Face - Midwinter Tales • Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch

... bread; but the soul, existing in the sphere of spiritual relations, is supported by truth, the nourishing breath of God's love. We are in the eternal world, then, at present. Its laws and influences penetrate and rule us; its ethereal tides lave and bear us on; our experience and destiny in it are decided every moment by our characters. If we are pure in heart, have vital faith and force, we shall see God and have new revelations made to us. Such are among the ...
— The Destiny of the Soul - A Critical History of the Doctrine of a Future Life • William Rounseville Alger

... beautiful specimen might have been lately seen in a garden at Wuertemberg—for there might have been met successively a wild boar, a hermit, several sepulchres, and a barque detaching itself from the shore of its own accord, in order to lead you into a boudoir where water-spouts lave you when you are settling yourself down upon ...
— Bouvard and Pecuchet - A Tragi-comic Novel of Bourgeois Life • Gustave Flaubert

... but thou may thieve; What then? poor beastie, thou maun live! A daimen icker in a thrave 'S a sma' request: I'll get a blessin wi' the lave, An' never miss't! ...
— The Golden Treasury - Of the Best Songs and Lyrical Poems in the English Language • Various

... lave for that? Faix, an' I didn't. Didn't he get me into trouble wid my missus, the haythen! Ye're aware yerself how the boondles comin' in from the grocery often contains more'n'll go into anything dacently. So, for that matter, I'd now and then take out a sup o' sugar, or flour, or tay, ...
— Successful Recitations • Various

... the current, between wide meadows, we turned aside into the Assabeth. A more lovely stream than this, for a mile above its junction with the Concord, has never flowed on earth—nowhere indeed except to lave the interior regions of a poet's imagination.... It comes flowing softly through the midmost privacy and deepest heart of a wood which whispers it to be quiet; while the stream whispers back again from ...
— Hawthorne - (English Men of Letters Series) • Henry James, Junr.

... human honor, let us lave Your feet and bind your wounds on bended knee, Though coward hands have nailed you to the tree And shed your innocent blood and dug your grave, Rejoice and live! Your oriflamme shall wave While man has power to perish and ...
— Current History, A Monthly Magazine - The European War, March 1915 • New York Times

... not mane to lave me behind!" exclaimed the anxious soldier, as his captain now recommended him to stand closely concealed near the ruin until his return. "Who knows what ambuscade the she-divil may not lade your honour into; and thin who will you have to bring ...
— Wacousta: A Tale of the Pontiac Conspiracy (Complete) • John Richardson

... all. I gave him all that he required from me. 900 Both wine and bread, and, at his bidding, swore To tell thee nought in twelve whole days to come, Or till, enquiry made, thou should'st thyself Learn his departure, lest thou should'st impair Thy lovely features with excess of grief. But lave thyself, and, fresh attired, ascend To thy own chamber, there, with all thy train, To worship Pallas, who shall save, thenceforth, Thy son from death, what ills soe'er he meet. Add not fresh sorrows to the present woes 910 Of ...
— The Odyssey of Homer • Homer

... from the Belgian race I found, Who, once in times remote, to British ground Strangers like me came from a foreign strand. I loved at large along the extended sand To roam, and oft beneath the swelling wave, Tho' known so fatal once, my limbs to lave; Or join the children in their summer play, First in their sports, companion of their way. Thus while from many a hand a meal I sought, Winter and age had certain misery brought; But Fortune smiled, a safe and blest abode A new-found master's generous love bestowed, And midst these shades, ...
— Anecdotes of Dogs • Edward Jesse

... carry the male on my showlders. There's liss of it now; an' maybe I could manage it, iv you'ld only carry the spids, an' thim other things. We moight lave the knapsicks an' kyarthridge-box behind. What use ud they be in Kalifornya? They'll only lade to our detiction by the throops ...
— The Wild Huntress - Love in the Wilderness • Mayne Reid

... her Ladyship in and out like a dog at a fair, axin', 'Is Miss Bawn in yet, Neil?' His Lordship doesn't know, glory be, or maybe 'tis havin' a bad attack of the gout he'd be. If I was you, Miss Bawn, I'd give up the Creamery, so I would, or lave it to the commonalty! Sure 'twould be fitter for the like o' you to be sittin' at home in the drawing-room, playin' the piano-forty. Yes, your Ladyship, here she is at last. I was just tellin' her that your Ladyship was like a hen on a hot ...
— The Story of Bawn • Katharine Tynan

... douche, balneation^, bath. deluge &c (water in motion) 348; high water, flood tide. V. be watery &c adj.; reek. add water, water, wet; moisten &c 339; dilute, dip, immerse; merge; immerge, submerge; plunge, souse, duck, drown; soak, steep, macerate, pickle, wash, sprinkle, lave, bathe, affuse^, splash, swash, douse, drench; dabble, slop, slobber, irrigate, inundate, deluge; syringe, inject, gargle. Adj. watery, aqueous, aquatic, hydrous, lymphatic; balneal^, diluent; drenching &c v.; diluted &c v.; weak; wet &c (moist) 339. ...
— Roget's Thesaurus of English Words and Phrases: Body • Roget

... yerselves to be goin' up. The place is not fit for quality. Lave yer charity with me, an' I'll give it to the childe." Jane insisted on going up. The woman said she would bring Samuel down to them. She seemed anxious to keep them back. But suddenly Samuel himself appeared ...
— The Weans at Rowallan • Kathleen Fitzpatrick

... a rocky road to Dublin, but a shorter wan to hell! Did you want f'r to shoot, Jack? Look at Dave Elerson an' th' thrigger finger av him twitchin' all a-thremble! Wisha, lad! lave the red omadhouns go. Arre you tired o' the hair ye wear, Jack Mount? Come on out ...
— The Maid-At-Arms • Robert W. Chambers

... kindly old man brought us a bowl of water in which to lave our hands, and then a spotless white towel, for he had associated much with Europeans in his younger days and had adopted many of their customs. On Sundays he always wore to church coat, trousers, shirt, ...
— The Call Of The South - 1908 • Louis Becke

... it's mesilf as would fly away an' lave you to waller on the dirty earth ye belongs ...
— Over the Rocky Mountains - Wandering Will in the Land of the Redskin • R.M. Ballantyne

... little aboon the knee and paidilt i' the burn, gettin' gey an' weet the while. Then Sally pu'd the gowans wat wi' dew an' twined her bree wi' tasseled broom, while I had a wee crackie wi' Tibby Buchan, the flesher's dochter frae Auld Reekie. Tibby's nae giglet gawky like the lave, ye ken,—she's a sonsie maid, as sweet as ony hinny pear, wi' her twa pawky een an' her ...
— Penelope's Progress - Being Such Extracts from the Commonplace Book of Penelope Hamilton As Relate to Her Experiences in Scotland • Kate Douglas Smith Wiggin

... which we I-lave repeatedly legislated are being altered from decade to decade, it is evident, under our very eyes, and are likely to change even more rapidly and more radically in the days immediately ahead of us, ...
— Complete State of the Union Addresses from 1790 to the Present • Various

... December, was read at Stirling. Nobles and people replied with protestations to every royal proclamation. Foremost on the popular side was the young Earl of Montrose: "you will not rest," said Rothes, a more sober leader, "till you be lifted up above the lave in three fathoms of rope." Rothes was a true prophet; but Montrose did not die for the cause that did "his green unknowing ...
— A Short History of Scotland • Andrew Lang

... spake, my Kate, of snaw-white webs, Made o' your linkum twine, But, ah! I fear our bonny burn Will ne'er lave web o' thine. The weary ...
— Library Of The World's Best Literature, Ancient And Modern, Vol 3 • Various

... quhare that ladie stude, (Far my luve fure ower the sea). Bot dern is the lave of Elfinland wud, (The Knicht pruvit ...
— A History of English Romanticism in the Nineteenth Century • Henry A. Beers

... belly deep; the mule had lowered its head; the old man was kneeling at the brink. Wayland saw him lave the water up with his hand: then throw it violently back. All at once, the grip of life snapped. Matthews was lying motionless on the sand. The horse was chocking its head up and down; the mule was stamping angrily with fore feet roiling the pool bottom. It had been one of ...
— The Freebooters of the Wilderness • Agnes C. Laut

... unto Becket's shrine, To kneel with fervour on his knee-worn grave, And with my tears his sainted ashes lave, Yet feel devotion rise no less divine— As rapt I gaze from Harbledown's decline And view the rev'rend temple where was shed That pamper'd prelate's blood—his marble bed Midst pillar'd pomp, where ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction, Vol. 17, No. - 480, Saturday, March 12, 1831 • Various

... know. Of course, we can't go to the matinee to-morrow. We can't ever go anywhere together again." Once more the tears threatened to fall. She shut her eyes and forced them back, then went dejectedly down the hall to the bathroom to lave her flushed face and ...
— Marjorie Dean High School Freshman • Pauline Lester

... crystal stream, Afton, how lovely it glides, And winds by the cot where my Mary resides; How wanton thy waters her snowy feet lave, As gathering sweet flow'rets ...
— The Ontario Readers: Fourth Book • Various

... the good-natured Irishman, "sure an' the poor baste's hurt, and, by your lave, cap'en, I'll go down and say what's ...
— The Wreck of the Nancy Bell - Cast Away on Kerguelen Land • J. C. Hutcheson

... post, tother zide o' telling-house.* Her coodn't lave 'ouze by raison of the Chirstmas bakkon comin' on, and ...
— Lorna Doone - A Romance of Exmoor • R. D. Blackmore

... of ocean spaces, Of hearts that are wild and brave, Of populous city places, Of desolate shores they lave, Of men who sally in quest of gold To sink in an ...
— The Spell of the Yukon • Robert Service

... couldn't torment Patsy no more, and him as glad of it as Aunt Bridgie herself, just like she knew he would be, and what an awful time you do be havin' with gurrls, and a baby comin', I says to myself and to Aunt Bridgie, 'There's the lady I'm goin' to worrk for if she'll lave me do ut,' and Aunt Bridgie was readin' to me in the paper about your gran' dinner party last night and I says to her and to myself, 'There'll be a main lot of dishes to be washed th' day and I'd better step over ...
— The Squirrel-Cage • Dorothy Canfield

... lengths of hair Above the bosom of the wave, While 'mid its golden meshes fair The distant sunbeams stoop to lave. Sweet isle of fancy, far beyond The dark dim vales of human woe, My bark of love sails o'er the fond Blue waves that ever ...
— The Poets and Poetry of Cecil County, Maryland • Various

... off—furiously] Lave go of me, ye old ape! Marry her, is it? I'd see her roasting in hell first! I'm shipping away out of this, I'm telling you! [Pointing to Anna—passionately] And my curse on you and the curse of Almighty God and all the ...
— Anna Christie • Eugene O'Neill

... happy he Who is like that planted tree; Living waters lave his root, Bends his bough ...
— Hymns for Christian Devotion - Especially Adapted to the Universalist Denomination • J.G. Adams

... oor the tops o' sthools, the both forninst an' back! He'll lave yez pick the blessed flure, an' walk the straightest crack! He's liftin' barrels wid his teeth, and singin' "Garry Owen," Till all the house be strikin' hands, ...
— Pipes O'Pan at Zekesbury • James Whitcomb Riley

... Green and of mild declivity, the last, As 't were the cape, of a long ridge of such, Save that there was no sea to lave its base, ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 13, No. 76, February, 1864 • Various

... a parent maun cleave to the last o' his flock.—Weel, whether it was 'at their herts was ower muckle wrappit up i' this ae human cratur for the growth o' their sowls, I dinna ken—there bude to be some rizzon for't—this last ane o' a' begud in his turn to dwine an' dwin'le like the lave; an' whaurever thae twa puir fowk turnt themsel's i' their pangs, there stude deith, glowerin' at them oot o' his toom e'en. Pray they did, ye may be sure, an' greit whan a' was mirk, but prayers nor tears made ...
— Warlock o' Glenwarlock • George MacDonald

... lave of them," said another, "snurling up her neb at a man for lack of gear. Why didna he brag of some rich ...
— A Son of Hagar - A Romance of Our Time • Sir Hall Caine

... "lave a chap aloon, will 'ee? Ye war afinding faut wi' preachers a while agoo—y' are fond enough o' preachin' yoursen. Ye may like work better nor play, but I like play better nor work; that'll 'commodate ye—it laves ye th' ...
— Adam Bede • George Eliot

... of the Roman Catholics in Ireland appears to lave engaged the attention of Mr. Burke at a very early period of his political life. It was probably soon after the year 1765 that he formed the plan of a work upon that subject, the fragments of which are now given to the public. No title is prefixed to it in the original manuscript; ...
— The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, Vol. VI. (of 12) • Edmund Burke

... gien ye dinna tak till ye yer pooer an' reign? Ilk man 'at 's in ony sense a king o' men is bun' to reign ower them in that sense. I ken little aboot things mysel', an' I ha'e no feelin's to guide me, but I ha'e a wheen cowmon sense, an' that maun jist stan' for the lave." ...
— The Marquis of Lossie • George MacDonald

... too! That and this ruckle of stones we sit in are all that's left of what was my father's and my grandfather's and their forebears back till the dark of time. And how is it, ye may ask? Let us pretermit the question till another occasion; anyway here's Drimdarroch wi' the lave, at any rate the weight of it in processes, records, caveats, multiple poindings, actions of suspension and declator, interim decrees, fugie warrants, compts, and reckonings—God! I have the cackle of the law in my head ...
— Doom Castle • Neil Munro

... of this runs the alimentary canal, down which waters may flow and disappear like unto a stream lost in the sand, to reappear and ooze from skin, lungs, kidneys and intestinal canal. Every organ and tissue luxuriates in water; they lave and live in and by it. With all kinds of food it is introduced into the body. Water acts as a solvent for the nutritious elements and as a sponsor for the elimination of foreign substances and worn-out tissues of the system. It also serves to maintain a proper degree of tension in the ...
— Intestinal Ills • Alcinous Burton Jamison

... digging a big drain to carry it off into the river. Then, when the swamp is dry, we will plant eatable things in it, and perhaps set up more booths and huts and dig more baths. Thus, in course of time—who knows?—we may have a big town here, and King Hudibras himself may condescend to lave his royal limbs in ...
— The Hot Swamp • R.M. Ballantyne

... his companion in all these Liddesdale raids, "sic an endless fund of humour and drollery as he had then wi' him. Never ten yards but we were either laughing or roaring and singing. Wherever we stopped, how brawlie he suited himsel' to everybody! He aye did as the lave did; never made himsel' the great man or took ony airs in the company. I've seen him in a' moods in these jaunts, grave and gay, daft and serious, sober and drunk—(this, however, even in our wildest ...
— Sir Walter Scott - (English Men of Letters Series) • Richard H. Hutton

... the walls as I speak his name—has nine an' seventy ways of makin' off with you. Boy, I've known the day in these seas when he'd do it for practice. But he's old now an' tender of hear-rt. He laves it to your good sense to lave him alone. 'Tis well, you trusted no one save old Monkhouse. Adhere to it, lad, or I'll be mournin', one of these gay mornin's, with you gone—an' your name on no passenger list save—what's the name of that ...
— Fate Knocks at the Door - A Novel • Will Levington Comfort

... education that God has sent me through you, and have applied myself to become capable of spreading the word of the Lord through my native land; and for this reason I can to-day declare to you sincerely the decision that I lave taken, assured that as tender and affectionate parents you will calm yourselves, and as German parents and patriots you will rather praise my resolution than seek ...
— Celebrated Crimes, Complete • Alexandre Dumas, Pere

... lamb," says that excellent woman. "Bad scran to the one that made yer purty heart sore. Lave her to me now, Misther Curzon, dear, an' I'll take a mother's care of her." (This in an aside to the astounded professor.) "There now, alanna! Take courage now! Sure 'tis to the right shop ye've come, anyway, for 'tis daughthers I have meself, me dear—fine, sthrappin' girls as could put you ...
— A Little Rebel - A Novel • Margaret Wolfe Hungerford

... it's just my opinion, Mrs M'Shane," replied the elder O'Toole, "that he's not quite so far off; so with your lave, or by your lave, or without your lave, we'll just have a look over ...
— Japhet, In Search Of A Father • Frederick Marryat

... strikes rebounding; whence the shatter'd oak, So fierce a shock unable to withstand, Admits the sea: in at the gaping side The crowding waves gush with impetuous rage Resistless, overwhelming; horrors seize The mariners; Death in their eyes appears, They stare, they lave, they pump, they swear, they pray (Vain efforts!) still the battering waves rush in, Implacable, till, delug'd by the foam, The ship sinks foundering in ...
— The Book of Humorous Verse • Various

... man. Och! it's a lovely land fer a gravyince, an' I'll niver lave it.' He looked Jim up and down again. 'It's put th' good heart in you, Done.' Jim nodded smilingly. 'D'ye be hearin' iv th' little lady from off the ship?' continued Phil, as if ...
— In the Roaring Fifties • Edward Dyson

... sure you be a lady, even if you are here with the likes of me—I had to lave me father, we was so poor and the taxes is so high, and the rint so big intirely, and the landlord a-threatenin' of us to set us in the road any foine mornin'; and so I'm goin' to Ameriky to take a place; me cousin left to be married, and if I does well—an' sure I'll try ...
— Bessie's Fortune - A Novel • Mary J. Holmes

... fellowship allow. Long exile is in store for thee, huge plain of sea to plough, 780 Then to Hesperia shalt thou come, where Lydian Tiber's wave The wealthiest meads of mighty men with gentle stream doth lave: There happy days and lordship great, and kingly wife, are born For thee. Ah! do away thy tears for loved Creusa lorn. I shall not see the Myrmidons' nor Dolopes' proud place, Nor wend my ways to wait ...
— The AEneids of Virgil - Done into English Verse • Virgil

... your tidings, O ye raging Seas? Do your waves wash the islands of the blest, Or view the Gardens of Hesperides? Know you the unborn spirits' place of rest? And do your waters lave that unknown shore? And when the night is gone, Shall the freed spirit, tired and faint no more, Behold the dawn? The sad sea murmured, as its waves rolled high: As all those gone before, thou, too, to know, ...
— Mountain idylls, and Other Poems • Alfred Castner King

... little man. I wonder if any one had ever more energy upon so little strength? I know there is a frost; . . . but I mean to break that frost inside two years, and pull off a big success, and Vanity whispers in my ear that I have the strength. If I haven't, whistle owre the lave o't! I can do without glory, and perhaps the time is not far off when I can do without corn. It is a time coming soon enough, anyway; and I have endured some two and forty years without public shame, and had a good time as I did it. If only I could secure a violent death, what a fine success! ...
— Robert Louis Stevenson - a Record, an Estimate, and a Memorial • Alexander H. Japp

... sorr? Me lave me rigimint, sorr? Me wid three years' sarvis an' sorra intry in my shate at all, only two, wan time I was dthronk wid a cowld in me nose, sorr. Me lave me rigimint? It was the rigimint lift me, sorr. As I tell ye just now, we'd bin marchin' an' fightin' for wakes and ...
— Experiences of a Dug-out, 1914-1918 • Charles Edward Callwell

... be hoped that the next time you lave this world, Master Cornbury, it will be in a purliter sort of manner. A civil question demands a civil answer anyhow," said Fitzpatrick, coolly ...
— Snarleyyow • Captain Frederick Marryat

... of the Sceirote cooks when they feel themselves insulted, and extending my mouth on either side nearly as far as the ears, I took down my haversac and departed, singing as I went the song of the ancient Demos, who, when dying, asked for his supper, and water wherewith to lave ...
— The Bible in Spain • George Borrow

... thim to anny wan without makin' th' wan that gets thim feel th' way Doherty felt to Clancy whin Clancy med a frindly call an' give Doherty's childher th' measles. We can't sell thim, we can't ate thim, an' we can't throw thim into th' alley whin no wan is lookin'. An' 'twud be a disgrace f'r to lave befure we've pounded these frindless an' ongrateful people into insinsibility. So I suppose, Hinnissy, we'll have to stay an' do th' best we can, an' lave Andhrew Carnegie secede fr'm th' Union. They'se wan consolation; an' that is, ...
— Mr. Dooley: In the Hearts of His Countrymen • Finley Peter Dunne

... didst beget My earliest, youngest woe. The tears are streaming yet Which first thou madest flow. Quenchless this source is found Which thou hast first unsealed. It issues from a wound That never may be healed. But in the bitter wave I shall be clean restored, And from my soul shall lave ...
— The Poems of Emma Lazarus - Vol. II. (of II.), Jewish Poems: Translations • Emma Lazarus

... banks yon rushing waters lave; There Orinoco checks great ocean's wave; Thine is the stream; it cleaves the well known coast, Where Paria's walks thy former footsteps boast. But these no more thy wide discoveries bound; Superior ...
— The Columbiad • Joel Barlow

... her to her? She pits nae vailue upon her. Eh, man, gin she wad gie her to me, I wad haud her i' the best o' shune a' the lave o' her days.' ...
— Robert Falconer • George MacDonald

... modest, so ye are," said the chief. "But nivir ye moind—lave it all to me. I'll ...
— A Castle in Spain - A Novel • James De Mille

... your clavers! You need not grizzle at a creature because he admires a wee gairl that is just beyond the lave,—a sonsie wee thing with a glint ...
— Not Like Other Girls • Rosa N. Carey

... pay you back to the last farthing, and that the past could be obliterated from my mind. I would have parted with my life willingly, gladly, to serve you. Had you been poor, how delightful would it have been to labour for my benefactor! I will not deceive you. I lave learnt every thing. Such miserable knowledge never came to the ears of man, save in those regions where perdition is first made known, and suffered everlastingly. I dare not distrust the evidence of my eyes and ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, No. 327 - Vol. 53, January, 1843 • Various

... alone! I looked above. That star seemed happy thus to lave Its fairy light and glance of love Deep in the bosom of ...
— Graham's Magazine Vol XXXII. No. 3. March 1848 • Various

... fancy! Gien it be a man's pairt to cairry a sair hert, it canna be his pairt to sit doon wi' 't upo' the ro'd-side, an' lay't upo' his lap, an' greit ower't, like a bairn wi' a cuttit finger: he maun haud on his ro'd. Wha am I to differ frae the lave o' my fowk! I s' be like the lave, an' gien I greit I winna girn. The Lord himsel' had to be croont wi' pain. Eh, my bonnie doo! But ye lo'e a better man, an' that's a sair comfort! Gien it had been itherwise, I div not think I could ...
— Donal Grant • George MacDonald

... a word said, save when Roberto led her down, to the water and she felt it lave her feet. Then he muttered, ...
— Ruth Fielding and the Gypsies - The Missing Pearl Necklace • Alice B. Emerson

... come before, only the day afther the young lady took me to saw wood for the ould nagur, I got the pleurisy, and didn't lave my bed these five weeks," said the man, lingering about ...
— May Brooke • Anna H. Dorsey

... doctors and nurses in the hospital could tell him what would make all clear." She went through many of the houses, inquiring for Ellen Montgomery, but could not find her, and she was finally obliged to go to a hotel and rest. "I will take the lave of the houses in the morning," she thought, "it is aye the last thing that is the right thing; everybody finds ...
— A Knight of the Nets • Amelia E. Barr

... did not stop till she reached the spring and threw herself down full length to drink, to lave her burnt face, to drink again of the alkali brackish water that trickled down her ...
— A Texas Ranger • William MacLeod Raine

... sweet, as when the silv'ry wave Delights the pebbly beach to lave; And now majestic as the sound Of rolling thunder gathering round; Now pealing more loudly, as when from yon height Descends the mad mountain-stream, foaming and bright; Now in a song of love Dying away, As through the aspen grove Soft zephyrs play: Now heavier ...
— The Works of Frederich Schiller in English • Frederich Schiller

... mountain to the mighty main, Fresh from the rock and swelling by the tree, Rushing to meet, and dare, and breast the sea— Fair, noble, glorious river! in thy wave The sunniest slopes and sweetest pastures lave; The mountain torrent, with its wintry roar, Springs from its home and leaps upon thy shore: The promontories love thee—and for this Turn their rough cheeks, and ...
— Choice Specimens of American Literature, And Literary Reader - Being Selections from the Chief American Writers • Benj. N. Martin

... ye out to see O'er the rude, sandy lea, Where stately Jordan flows by many a palm, Or where Gennesaret's wave Delights the flowers to lave, That o'er her western slope breathe airs ...
— A Life of St. John for the Young • George Ludington Weed

... gently, children, where the blue wave, Beating harmonious cadence, the shore doth lave; Its murmuring song is pleasant unto the soul, And like a lamentation ...
— Legends of the Middle Ages - Narrated with Special Reference to Literature and Art • H.A. Guerber

... one of them, "what made Mrs. Sunderland's cook and chamber maid go aff and lave her right in the ...
— Trials and Confessions of a Housekeeper • T. S. Arthur

... sup behoved e coge of e colde water, & enne e cry ryses The boat of the cold water, and then the cry rises; [Gh]et coruen ay e cordes & kest al er-oute Yet cut they the cords and cast all there-out. Mony ladde er forth-lep to laue & to kest Many a lad there forth leapt to lave and to cast, Scopen out e scael water, at fayn scape wolde To scoop out the scathful water that fain escape would; For be monnes lode neuer so luer, e lyf is ay swete For be man's lot never so bad, the life is aye ...
— Early English Alliterative Poems - in the West-Midland Dialect of the Fourteenth Century • Various

... gentle ripples, from the side we lave Of placid lake, will reach the other side, So, o'er Death's river—silent, dark, and wide— Blossoms may bear the kiss ...
— The Death of Saul and other Eisteddfod Prize Poems and Miscellaneous Verses • J. C. Manning

... the Euxine, and the wave Broke foaming o'er the blue Symplegades. 'Tis a grand sight, from off the giant's grave, To watch the progress of those rolling seas Between the Bosphorus, as they lash and lave Europe and Asia, you being quite ...
— The Life of Lord Byron • John Galt



Words linked to "Lave" :   clean, flow, scrub up, scrub, lavage, freshen up, lap, shampoo, refresh, sponge down, cleanse, freshen, gargle, refreshen, hush, rinse, lavation



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