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Hie

verb
(past & past part. hied; pres. part. hieing or hying)
1.
Move fast.  Synonyms: belt along, bucket along, cannonball along, hasten, hotfoot, pelt along, race, rush, rush along, speed, step on it.  "The cars raced down the street"






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"Hie" Quotes from Famous Books



... now, mon garcon. I have a French feather-bed there, which I have been at pains to keep these years back. I had it at the sacking of Issodun, and the King himself hath not such a bed. If you throw me, it is thine; but, if I throw you, then you are under a vow to take bow and bill and hie with me to France, there to serve in the White Company as long ...
— The White Company • Arthur Conan Doyle

... can be a silent, man. No brother could be more tender of the feelings of others than he. Come, you will consent to be my guest to-night. You are unwell; I shall be your amateur physician. My treatment and a night of rest will put you all right, and to-morrow, by break of day, we will hie back to Chamouni over ...
— Rivers of Ice • R.M. Ballantyne

... upon the world, and lo! we live in another. It hides in a night the old scars and familiar places with which we have grown heart-sick or enamored. So, as quietly as we can, we hustle on our embroidered robes and hie us on Prince Camaralzaman's horse or in the reindeer sleigh into the white country where the seven colors converge. This is when our fancy can overcome the ...
— Waifs and Strays - Part 1 • O. Henry

... of my tribe? Where are Old Weasel Asleep and Orlando the Hie Jacet Promoter? Where are Prickly Ash Berry and The Avenging Wart? Where are The Roman-nosed Pelican ...
— Remarks • Bill Nye

... my will is even this: That presently you hie you home to bed. 90 Thou subtle, perjured, false, disloyal man! Think'st thou I am so shallow, so conceitless, To be seduced by thy flattery, That hast deceived so many with thy vows? Return, return, and make thy love amends. 95 For me,—by this pale queen of night ...
— Two Gentlemen of Verona - The Works of William Shakespeare [Cambridge Edition] [9 vols.] • William Shakespeare

... the curtains and blinds, let God's sunshine and fresh air in. Take no medicine except what I give you. I must bring my wife and Mattie to see you, and you and they must romp all over this country in a few days—providing a favorable wind does not set in. For I must hie away to the North Pole at ...
— Doctor Jones' Picnic • S. E. Chapman

... shoes the yellow, he shoes the gray, The swiftest he saddles before it is day! He places his bride on the steed behind, She follows him safe, she follows him blind. He rides with her off, to the sea they hie, With him she would willingly ...
— Early Plays - Catiline, The Warrior's Barrow, Olaf Liljekrans • Henrik Ibsen

... "Hie thee up, good maid, and so do," replied Mrs Wade cheerily, taking up a candlestick to light Mr Pulleyne to the room prepared for him, where, as she knew from past experience, he was very likely to sit at study till ...
— The King's Daughters • Emily Sarah Holt

... bleu! eh, sacre bleu!" exclaimed the new-comer (so much, at any rate, he had learnt from Beranger), as he kicked at the kitchen door and shook his saturated mantle. "What sort of a country is this? Hie, there, a light! Is there ...
— A Hungarian Nabob • Maurus Jokai

... not to me, get thee gone! Death and destruction dog thee at thy heels; Thy mother's name is ominous to children. If thou wilt outstrip death, go cross the seas, And live with Richmond, from the reach of hell: Go, hie thee, hie thee from this slaughter-house, Lest thou increase the number of the dead; And make me die the thrall of Margaret's curse, Nor mother, wife, ...
— The Life and Death of King Richard III • William Shakespeare [Collins edition]

... and pleasant" So you hie yourself away To the wild-wood sweet and shady For a joyous, happy day; Then the rain comes down in torrents Till it drowns the very snakes, And you have a high example Of the ...
— Oklahoma Sunshine • Freeman E. (Freeman Edwin) Miller

... and lads, get leave of your dads, And away to the Maypole hie, For ev'ry fair has a sweetheart there, And ...
— Old Ballads • Various

... of the two dialects, and history records the reason of it. We learn from the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, A.D. 658, that "Cenwealh in this year fought against the Welsh at Pen, and put them to flight as far as the Parret." "Her Kenwealh gefeaht aet Peonnum with Wealas, and hie geflymde oth Pedridan." Upon this passage Lappenberg in his "England under the Anglo-Saxon kings" remarks: "The reign of Cenwealh is important on account of the aggrandisement of Wessex. He defeated in several battles the Britons of Dyvnaint ...
— A Glossary of Provincial Words & Phrases in use in Somersetshire • Wadham Pigott Williams

... fie hie sly cry shy vie sty pry why lied fried sky tied vied tried pried ally rely defy deny reply spry skies flies cried supply spied ...
— The Beacon Second Reader • James H. Fassett

... to see what it was, but had he growled "Hands off!" she could not have scurried away more precipitately. He then ponderously marched his charge to the door, where, assuredly, he did a strange thing. Instead of knocking or ringing, he stood on the step and called out sharply, "Hie, hie, hie!" until the ...
— The Little White Bird - or Adventures In Kensington Gardens • J. M. Barrie

... unto London I did me hie, Of all the land it beareth the prize; "Hot peascodes!" one began to cry; "Strawberries ripe!" and "Cherries in the rise!"[104] One bade me come near and buy some spice; Pepper and saffrone they 'gan me bede;[105] But, for lack of ...
— English Satires • Various

... Such as the world admyr'd, and praised it. So what with hope of good, and hate of ill, He me perswaded forth with him to fare. Nought tooke I with me, but mine oaten quill: Small needments else need shepheard to prepare. So to the sea we came; the sea, that is A world of waters heaped up on hie, Rolling like mountaines in wide wildernesse, Horrible, ...
— Spenser - (English Men of Letters Series) • R. W. Church

... Joceliande, and hie before her messenger to the chamber of Solita. No pearls or purple robes had she to clad her beauty in, but a simple gown of white wool fastened with a silver girdle about the waist, and her hair she loosed ...
— Ensign Knightley and Other Stories • A. E. W. Mason

... rear only four children per marriage, and if we are to give the medical man liberty to weed out the weaklings, it behoves us to see that the children whom we produce are of the best quality. Let us, therefore, hie to the stud-farm, observe its methods and proceed to apply them to the human race. We must definitely prevent feeble-minded persons from propagating their species. Within limits, that is a proposition with which all instructed persons would agree, though few, we imagine, ...
— Science and Morals and Other Essays • Bertram Coghill Alan Windle

... the client's lips, the lawyer got gayly into his gig. "Hie away, old girl!" cried Pedgift Senior, patting the fast-trotting mare with the end of his whip. "I never keep a lady waiting—and I've got business to-night with ...
— Armadale • Wilkie Collins

... is fast, And her doom is cast, There stay! Oh, stay! When the charm is around her, And the spell has bound her, Hie away! away!' ...
— Grimms' Fairy Tales • The Brothers Grimm

... to so famous a Lord: But leaving him that dying left al Artes, and al strangers as Orphanes, forsaken, and friendles, I will wholy convert my muze to you (my second patron) who amongst many that beare their crests hie, and mingle their titles with TAMMARTI QUAM MERCURIO are an unfayned embracer of vertues, and nourisher of knowledge and learning. I published long since my first fruits of such as were but meanely entred in the Italian tongue, (which because they were the first, and the tree but young ...
— Shakespeare's Lost Years in London, 1586-1592 • Arthur Acheson

... here to-day the cloud of thunder lours To-morrow it will hie on far behests; The flesh will grieve on other bones than ours Soon, and the soul will mourn in ...
— Last Poems • A. E. Housman

... ne moe to meete agayne, Wythyn thie wydow'dd berte wyll everr brenn The frostie vygyls of a cloysterr'd nun, Insteade of faerie[10] love's effulgentt sonne! Ne moe with myne wyll carolynge[11] beatt hie, Gyve throbb for throbb, and sygh returne forr sygh, Butt bee bie nyghtt congeall'dd bie lethall feares, Bie daie consum'dd awaie ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction - Vol. 12, Issue 330, September 6, 1828 • Various

... have turned him from his loyalty, and he promises to do their will. But he says that she who is to be lady of Constantinople must needs be very graceful and fair and wise, rich and of high degree. Then his counsellors say to him that they will make ready and will hie them into the German land to sue for the daughter of the emperor. They counsel him to take her; for the emperor of Germany is very mighty and very powerful and his daughter is so fair that never in Christendom was there a damsel of such beauty. The emperor grants them all their suit; and they ...
— Cliges: A Romance • Chretien de Troyes

... of the peasantry which takes place the Monday before Lent. The young men dress themselves gaily, and, armed with wooden clubs, hie them to the village green. Here a barrel is suspended with a cat inside it. Each man knocks the barrel with his club as he runs underneath it, and he who knocks a hole big enough to liberate poor puss is the victor. The grotesque costumes, the difficulty ...
— Denmark • M. Pearson Thomson

... to slip out to Johnstown to spend Sunday with her mother. How I wish I could slip out to Rochester to sit a few hours in my mother's delightful east chamber, but I must hie me back to New York by tonight's ...
— The Life and Work of Susan B. Anthony (Volume 1 of 2) • Ida Husted Harper

... business, and not trouble poor people. Bah! such a speech was not like Louis Herbois! but out it came, Heaven knows how, and no sooner had I finished than up runs the young creature, and seizing my moustache she cries, "My brave fellow, hie away, and crop off all this; none but men have a right to it; God grant you were not born in France; no Frenchman could give such an answer to a man imploring protection for his wife. Look at ...
— The International Magazine, Volume 2, No. 2, January, 1851 • Various

... has proclaimed through the whole country, To the war with him each tenth man should hie. "My dearest Lady, worthy thou art In the field of honour to bear a part." ...
— Queen Berngerd, The Bard and the Dreams - and other ballads • Thomas J. Wise

... a warlock to hie to Iceland in some altered shape, and to try what he could learn there to tell him: and he set out in the shape of a whale. And when he came near to the land he went to the west side of Iceland, north around the land, where he saw all the mountains and hills full of guardian-spirits, some great, ...
— Heimskringla - The Chronicle of the Kings of Norway • Snorri Sturluson

... the bloody course of war, My dearest master, your dear son, may hie; Bless him at home in peace, whilst I from far, His name with zealous ...
— Writings in the United Amateur, 1915-1922 • Howard Phillips Lovecraft

... at last entered his inner apartment. Thus waking at midnight and remembering his promise, he summoned his cook and told him of his promise unto the Brahmana staying in the forest. And he commanded him, saying, 'Hie thee to that forest. A Brahmana waiteth for me in the hope of food. Go and entertain him with ...
— The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa - Translated into English Prose - Adi Parva (First Parva, or First Book) • Kisari Mohan Ganguli (Translator)

... birdes heard I sing, With voice of angell, in hir armonie, That busied hem, hir birdes forth to bring, The little pretty conies to hir play gan hie, And further all about I gan espie, The dredeful roe, the buck, the hart, and hind, Squirrels, and ...
— What's Mine's Mine • George MacDonald

... characteristic of rifle-matches, the evening draws toward the dew. The smoke-whitened guns are carefully swabbed with tow and prepared for their rest as tenderly as infants. Dobbin is rescued from the (fence) stake to hie hill-ward with his master, cantering exultant or jogging grumly according to the result of the "event;" and the metropolis of Petticoat Gap—for such, in the vernacular and on the maps, is its ...
— Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science Vol. XV., No. 85. January, 1875. • Various

... see the river," Betty called to them, stopping once more to listen to the rhythmic sound of splashing water. "Come on, girls. It can't be more than a few hundred feet away, even though we can't see it for the bushes. Lead on, Mollie Billette, I wouldst hie me hence." ...
— The Outdoor Girls at Wild Rose Lodge - or, The Hermit of Moonlight Falls • Laura Lee Hope

... and gold, four hundred mules load high; Fifty wagons his wrights will need supply, Till with that wealth he pays his soldiery. War hath he waged in Spain too long a time, To Aix, in France, homeward he will him hie. Follow him there before Saint Michael's tide, You shall receive and hold the Christian rite; Stand honour bound, and do him fealty. Send hostages, should he demand surety, Ten or a score, our loyal oath to bind; Send him our sons, the first-born of our wives;— An he be slain, I'll surely furnish ...
— The Song of Roland • Anonymous

... a potent spell, That bids the Virtues hie 10 From mystic grove and living cell, Confess'd ...
— The Complete Poetical Works of Samuel Taylor Coleridge - Vol I and II • Samuel Taylor Coleridge

... that lapped the sleek sides of a yacht lying at anchor under the hill. A yacht that Paul had watched many a day and dreamed of many a night; for he often longed with a great longing to slip cable and hie away, even unto ...
— In the Footprints of the Padres • Charles Warren Stoddard

... For the kind youth,—for Roderick too— Let me be just—that friend so true; In danger both, and in our cause! Minstrel, the Douglas dare not pause. Why else that solemn warning given, 'If not on earth, we meet in heaven!' Why else, to Cambus-kenneth's fane, If eve return him not again, Am I to hie and make me known? Alas! he goes to Scotland's throne, Buys his friends' safety with his own; He goes to do—what I had done, Had Douglas' daughter ...
— The Lady of the Lake • Sir Walter Scott

... the report following being made from the Committee concerning the education of Hie-land Boys ...
— The Acts Of The General Assemblies of the Church of Scotland

... fell with Cape Mensurado to the Southeast, about two leagues off. This Cape may be easily knowen, by reason yet the rising of it is like a Porpose-head. Also toward the Southeast there are three trees, whereof the Eastermost tree is the highest, and the middlemost is like a hie stacke, and the Southermost like vnto a gibet: and vpon the maine are foure or fiue high hilles rising one after another like round hommocks or hillocks. And the Southeast of the three trees, brandiernwise: and all the coast along is white sand. ...
— The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of - The English Nation, Vol. 11 • Richard Hakluyt

... of a migratory movement even up and down the mountains among these interesting birdlets. In the winter a few descend from the heights and dwell on the plains, where the weather is not so rigorous. On the approach of spring they again hie up into the mountains, spending the summer there and rearing their pretty bairns. However, the majority of them remain in the mountains all winter, braving the bitterest and fiercest storms, often at an altitude of 8,000 feet. Their breeding range is from 6,000 ...
— Our Bird Comrades • Leander S. (Leander Sylvester) Keyser

... said the knight. "Hie thee back again to the lodge and wait for me there. Wilton shall let you share his supper if thou wilt. I will tell them you are a gardener if they ask aught about thee," and in answer to the beckoning of his wife, ...
— Heiress of Haddon • William E. Doubleday

... by some strange chance, to stumble upon that incomparable specimen of modern sculpture which stands on high at King's-Cross, lifted up, in order, we presume, to enable the good citizens duly to feast their eyes upon its manifold perfections, as they daily hie them to and fro between their western or suburban retreats and the purlieus of King Street or Cheapside. What estimate would the stranger form of the taste or skill of those who placed on its pedestal the statue we have first supposed him to have found? It avails not to disguise the truth. ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, No. 327 - Vol. 53, January, 1843 • Various

... stabilienda, (Pace etiamnum durante Diuque ut boni jam omnes sperant duratura) Cum summa potestate legatus; MATTHAEUS PRIOR, armiger: Qui Hos omnes, quibus cumulatus est, titulos Humanitatis, ingenii, eruditionis laude Superavit; Cui enim nascenti faciles arriserant musae. Hune puerum schola hie regia perpolivit; Juvenem in collegio S'ti Johannis Cantabrigia optimis scientiis instruxit; Virum denique auxit; et perfecit. Multa cum viris principibus consuetudo; Ita natus, ita institutus, A vatum chioro avelli nunquam potuit, Sed solebat saepe rerum ...
— The Works of Samuel Johnson, LL.D. in Nine Volumes - Volume the Eighth: The Lives of the Poets, Volume II • Samuel Johnson

... she's sailed west, Till she cam' to a narrow sea, The water ran like a river in spate, And the hills were wondrous hie. ...
— New Collected Rhymes • Andrew Lang

... strong enough for travelling. The snow lies thickly on the ground, and the winter's wind whistles keenly through the forest and across the plain. Stay a while with your good friends here, and I'll come back for thee, and then we will hie away to lead the free life we have enjoyed so long." Old Michael spoke in a more subdued tone ...
— The Trapper's Son • W.H.G. Kingston

... two years later. Saicho was specially sent to China by his sovereign to study Buddhism, in order that, on his return, he might become lord-abbot of a monastery which his Majesty had caused to be built on Hie-no-yama—subsequently known as Hiei-zan—a hill on the northeast of the new palace in Kyoto. A Japanese superstition regarded the northeast as the "Demon's Gate," where a barrier must be erected against the ingress of evil influences. ...
— A History of the Japanese People - From the Earliest Times to the End of the Meiji Era • Frank Brinkley and Dairoku Kikuchi

... offered: Land he allowed me, life-joy at homestead, Manor to live on. Little he needed From Gepids or Danes or in Sweden to look for 35 Trooper less true, with treasure to buy him; 'Mong foot-soldiers ever in front I would hie me, Alone in the vanguard, and evermore gladly Warfare shall wage, while this weapon endureth That late and ...
— Beowulf - An Anglo-Saxon Epic Poem • The Heyne-Socin

... soundest merrily, When the bridal party To the church doth hie! Bell! thou soundest solemnly. When, on ...
— The Complete Poetical Works of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow • Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

... This he invariably did on first leaving the house with me, sometimes nipping me so severely, after we had gone a short distance, that I have hesitated whether to go back for a pistol to shoot him, or forward for a pennyworth of biscuit to buy him off. When told to "hie away," the extravagance of his joy knew no bounds. He would have been as invaluable to a tailor as was to the Parisian decrotteur the poodle instructed by him to sully with his paws the shoes of the ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 4, No. 25, November, 1859 • Various

... Montjoy the herald? speed him hence: Let him greet England with our sharp defiance.— Up, princes! and, with spirit of honour edg'd More sharper than your swords, hie to the field: Bar Harry England, that sweeps through our land With pennons[3] painted in the blood of Harfleur: Go down upon him,—you have power enough,— And in a captive chariot into Rouen Bring ...
— King Henry the Fifth - Arranged for Representation at the Princess's Theatre • William Shakespeare

... medieval world. Marauders, pilgrims, and wandering gleemen go about in it. The knight stands at his garden pale, the lady sits at her bower window, and the little foot page carries messages over moss and moor. Marchmen are riding through the Bateable Land "by the hie light o' the moon." Monks are chanting in St. Mary's Kirk, trumpets are blowing in Carlisle town, castles are burning; down in the glen there is an ambush and swords are flashing; bows are twanging in the greenwood; four and twenty ladies are playing at ...
— A History of English Romanticism in the Eighteenth Century • Henry A. Beers

... influences. In the rude battle and business of life, we come home to find a nook and shelter of quiet comfort after the hard and severe, and, I may say, the sharp ire and the disputes of the House of Commons. I hie me home, knowing that I shall there find personal solicitude and anxiety. My head rests upon a bosom throbbing with emotion for me and our child; and I feel a more hearty man in the cause of my country, the next day, because of the perfect, soothing, gentle peace which a mind ...
— History of Woman Suffrage, Volume I • Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, and Matilda Joslyn Gage

... is Almighty! I declare there is no God but Allah! I declare Muhammad is his prophet! Hie ye to prayer! Hie ye to salvation! Prayer is better than sleep! Prayer is better than sleep! There ...
— King—of the Khyber Rifles • Talbot Mundy

... chanced so, Bold Robin in forest did spy A jolly butcher, with a bonny fine mare, With his flesh to the market did hie. ...
— Heroes Every Child Should Know • Hamilton Wright Mabie

... countenance of Hermiston. And a kind of horror fell upon her at what she had done. She wore a tragic mask. "Erchie, the Lord peety you, dear, and peety me! I have buildit on this foundation" - laying her hand heavily on his shoulder - "and buildit hie, and pit my hairt in the buildin' of it. If the hale hypothec were to fa', I think, laddie, I would dee! Excuse a daft wife that loves ye, and that kenned your mither. And for His name's sake keep yersel' frae inordinate desires; haud your heart in baith your hands, carry it canny and ...
— Weir of Hermiston • Robert Louis Stevenson

... door," and hie me to bed. As a matter of fact the people here are far too honest for us to lock the doors. Such a thing as theft is unheard of. Some may call it uncivilized. I call it ...
— Le Petit Nord - or, Annals of a Labrador Harbour • Anne Elizabeth Caldwell (MacClanahan) Grenfell and Katie Spalding

... mostly of will and at their own charge. In Franken, in Schwaben, in the Rhine Countries, a dissolute son would rob his father,—as shopmen their masters' tills, and managers their cash-boxes,—and hie off to those magnanimous Prussian Officials, who gave away companies like kreutzers, and had a value for young fellows of spirit. They hastened to Magdeburg with their Commissions; where they were received as common recruits, and put by force into the regiments suitable. ...
— History of Friedrich II. of Prussia, Vol. XIX. (of XXI.) • Thomas Carlyle

... the sun was in the West, the wind began to rise more and more, so that we coulde not keep our direct course, but were forced to put to the Southwest of the great Iland of Canaria, where we anchored: wee had sight of the Iland Teneriffe, and of an other of the Ilands of Canaria, wherein is the hie mountaine called the Pyck. This hil was from vs 14. miles, but by the great hight thereof it seemed to bee within foure or fiue miles off vs, but in the daie time when the sun shined wee could ...
— The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries - Vol. II • Richard Hakluyt

... worships in silence. This is followed by the second exhortation "of Wa'az," dispensing the words of wisdom. The Imam now stands up before the Mihrab (prayer niche) and recites the Ikamah which is the common Azan with one only difference: after "Hie ye to salvation" it adds "Come is the time of supplication;" whence the name, "causing" (prayer) "to stand" (i.e., to begin). Hereupon the worshippers recite the Farz or Koran commanded noon-prayer of Friday; and the unco' guid add a host of superogatories Those who would study the subject ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 1 • Richard F. Burton

... rules, Aim wily glances at unthinking fools; Or shew the lilly hand with graceful air, Or wound the fopling with a lock of hair: And when the hated discipline is o'er, And Misses tortur'd with Repent no more, They mount the pictur'd coach, and to the play The celebrated idols hie away. ...
— The Young Gentleman and Lady's Monitor, and English Teacher's Assistant • John Hamilton Moore

... Napoleon breathes his last— More woes must come—if now the worst be past. Napoleon's star, declining on his eye, Tells France shall yield him not a place to die. That he must hie him to an alien shore, And see his France, and blue-eyed boy no more. The noble Lion must be chained at length, By Fate's strong force, though not by man's weak strength. But, harmless now, that meaner ...
— Lays of Ancient Virginia, and Other Poems • James Avis Bartley

... I wish that Page enjoy'd his life So that he had some other to his wife; But never could I wish, of low or hie, A longer life, and see ...
— Devon, Its Moorlands, Streams and Coasts • Rosalind Northcote

... were left to me," said Sir Dagonet, "I would hie me to Ireland. A likely spot to find him, say I. For there are none who have said that they know of ...
— In the Court of King Arthur • Samuel Lowe

... ta'en the table wi' his hand, He garr'd the red wine spring on hie— "Now Christ's curse on my head," he said, "But avenged of Lord Scroope ...
— Types of Children's Literature • Edited by Walter Barnes

... Police, that in the teeth of the law, and under its very eyes, a shameless gaming-house exists in moral Yorkshire, throughout every Doncaster St Leger race-week? Of course you haven't; never dreamed of such a thing—never could, never would. Hie you, then, and prosecute this wretched gang of betting-touts, congregating at the corner of Bride Lane, Fleet Street; quick, lodge informations against this publican who has suffered card-playing to take place, raffles, or St Leger ...
— The Gaming Table: Its Votaries and Victims - Volume I (of II) • Andrew Steinmetz

... true; In danger both, and in our cause! Minstrel, the Douglas dare not pause. Why else that solemn warning given, 'If not on earth, we meet in heaven!' 230 Why else, to Cambus-kenneth's fane, If eve return him not again, Am I to hie, and make me known? Alas! he goes to Scotland's throne, Buys his friend's safety with his own; 235 He goes to do—what I had done, Had Douglas' ...
— Lady of the Lake • Sir Walter Scott

... they loue thee? that woulde I knowe As wel as me, I pray you showe I am the superiour of hie and lowe 170 No ...
— The Interlude of Wealth and Health • Anonymous

... right to hector people that hinder him as your paltry slave in the comedies? He brings word the ship is safe, or the choleric old man approaching: (magnificently) as for me, I hearken to the word of Jove and at his bidding do I now hie me hither. Wherefore 'tis still more seemly to get out, to get off ...
— Amphitryo, Asinaria, Aulularia, Bacchides, Captivi • Plautus Titus Maccius

... Sigurd: long had he been remote from the land, sojourning in the realm of Garda (western Russia) with King Valdamar,Sec. by whom was he held in great honour. Now Astrid conceived the desire that she should hie unto this her brother Sigurd. Therefore Hakon the Old furnished her with trusty followers & handsome equipment after the best manner. And she journeyed in the company of certain merchants. It was for the space of two winters she had ...
— The Sagas of Olaf Tryggvason and of Harald The Tyrant (Harald Haardraade) • Snorri Sturluson

... noted authors made their appearance. It was published at Washington, and afterward at New York, and made considerable pretensions to a national character. Hawthorne had been engaged as a contributor, at a fair rate, in 1838, and his articles had his name appended (not always Hie practice at that time) in a way that shows the high estimation into which he had already grown. "John Inglefield's Thanksgiving," "The Celestial Railroad," "The Procession of Life," "Fire Worship," "Buds and Bird Voices," and "Roger Malvin's Burial," all appeared in the "Democratic" ...
— A Study Of Hawthorne • George Parsons Lathrop

... I'll hie me to the bower That thou wi' roses tied, And where wi' mony a blushing bud I strove myself to hide. I'll doat on ilka spot Where I ha'e been wi' thee; And ca' to mind some kindly word ...
— The World's Best Poetry, Volume 3 - Sorrow and Consolation • Various

... And thirty sat alwayes; Who for their deeds and martiall feates, As bookes dou yet record, Amongst all other nations Wer feared through the world. And in the castle of Tayntagill, King Uther me begate Of Agyana, a bewtyous ladye, And come of hie estate. And when I was fifteen yeer old, Then was I crowned Kinge; All Brittaine that was att an uprore I did to quiett bring And drove the Saxons from the realme, Who had oppressed this land; All Scotland then throughe manly feates I conquered with my hand. Ireland, ...
— The Bay State Monthly, Volume 3, No. 2 • Various

... her father sitting still on hie, Did warily still watch the way she went, And eke from far observed with jealous eye, Which way his course the wanton ...
— The Philosophy of the Plays of Shakspere Unfolded • Delia Bacon

... news is heard with grief by all Met at Poseidon's festival; All Greece is conscious of the smart, He leaves a void in every heart; And to the Prytanis [33] swift hie The people, and they urge him on The dead man's manes to pacify And with ...
— The Works of Frederich Schiller in English • Frederich Schiller

... Now hie thee back, thou little foot-page, And greet thy lady from me, And tell her that I, her own true love, Will die, ...
— The Book of Brave Old Ballads • Unknown

...Hie thee hither, That I may pour my spirits in thine ear; And chastise with the valour of my tongue All that impedes thee from the golden round, Which fate and metaphysical aid doth seem To ...
— The Works of Samuel Johnson in Nine Volumes - Volume V: Miscellaneous Pieces • Samuel Johnson

... Dad. "An' is it great wonder the boy will run away to hie him here? The rogue kens a good thing equal to his elders. But come, boy; your mother is even now sure you have ...
— A Warwickshire Lad - The Story of the Boyhood of William Shakespeare • George Madden Martin

... Lakewood, and Croker wouldn't let any Tammany men go to dinner without them. Well, a bright young West Side politician, who held a three-thousan dollar job in one of the departments, went to Lakewood to ask Croker for something better. He wore a dress suit for the first time in his hie. It was his undoin'. He got stuck on himself. He thought he looked too beautiful for anything, and when he came home he was a changed man. As soon as he got to his house every evenin' he put on that dress Suit and set around in it until bedtime. That didn't satisfy him long. He wanted ...
— Plunkitt of Tammany Hall • George Washington Plunkitt

... wherever hie The travelling mountains of the sky. Or let the streams in civil mode Direct your choice upon ...
— Underwoods • Robert Louis Stevenson

... shall die. See, where my slave, the ugly monster Death, Shaking and quivering, pale and wan for fear, Stands aiming at me with his murdering dart, Who flies away at every glance I give, And, when I look away, comes stealing on!— Villain, away, and hie thee to the field! I and mine army come to load thy back With souls of thousand mangled carcasses.— Look, where he goes! but, see, he comes again, Because I stay! Techelles, let us march, And weary Death with bearing ...
— Tamburlaine the Great, Part II. • Christopher Marlowe

... beginning, viz.: "August. I walke many times into the pleasant fieldes of the Holy Scriptures, where I plucke up the goodliesome herbes of sentences by pruning: eate them by reading: chawe them by musing: and laie them up at length in the hie seate of memorie by gathering them together: that so having tasted their sweetenes I may the lesse perceave the bitterness of this miserable life." The covering is done in needle work by the Queen [then princess] herself, and thereon are these sentences, viz. on one side, on the borders; CELVM ...
— Bibliomania; or Book-Madness - A Bibliographical Romance • Thomas Frognall Dibdin

... you are surprised, Jane," said he, in a tone not without affection in it. "You did not expect, I suppose, ever to see me again. It was a mere chance brought me to America. I shall stay here a moment, and then hie me back again. I could not pass through the city without a 'How d'ye' to the little girl for whom I have still ...
— Jane Talbot • Charles Brockden Brown

... despite his orders, went unarmed over the top, in the whirl-wind of the charge, amidst the shriek of shell and tear of shrapnel, and picked up the American boy left for dead in No Man's Land, carrying him on hie back over the shell-torn fields ...
— The War Romance of the Salvation Army • Evangeline Booth and Grace Livingston Hill

... he strode and thus he spoke, to that Archbishop meek: "I take the land thy king bestows from Eure to Michael-peak, I take the maid, or foul or fair, a bargain with the toast, And for thy creed, a sea-king's gods are those that give the most. So hie thee back, and tell thy chief to make his proffer true, And he shall find a docile son, and ...
— Harold, Complete - The Last Of The Saxon Kings • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... tender age, Nor yet for his hie kin; But soon as ever he born is, He shall mount the gallow's ...
— The Chaplet of Pearls • Charlotte M. Yonge

... fool doth swear, These flowers to fool an emblem rare Of one, to fool, more sweet, more fair, E'en she that is beyond compare, A flower perchance for fool to wear, Who shall his foolish love declare Till she, mayhap, fool's life may share, Nor shall this fool of love despair, Till foolish hie shall go. ...
— The Geste of Duke Jocelyn • Jeffery Farnol

... upon newes of the taking of the Francis' (his stern-most vessel). 'The 18th day wee weied and stood north and by east into a lesser sound, which Sir Francis in his barge discovered the night before; and ankored in 13 fadomes, having hie steepe hiles on either side, some league distant ...
— At Last • Charles Kingsley

... "Hie myself over the sea," said the Knight, "and bid farewell to my friends and country. There is no better way ...
— The Elson Readers, Book 5 • William H. Elson and Christine M. Keck

... way," said Roscoe after hie had scrambled with amazing agility up to his "perch" in a tree several hundred feet distant but in full view of the stream. Tom had climbed up after him and was looking with curious pleasure at the little kit of rations ...
— Tom Slade Motorcycle Dispatch Bearer • Percy Keese Fitzhugh

... there they leaue him. Euery one of them hath his house, which is very little, set vpon six or eight posts, and they go vp to them with a ladder of twelue or foureteene staues. Their houses be for the most part by the hie wayes side, and among the trees, and in the woods. And they go with a great pot made of wood or fine earth, and couered, tied with a broad girdle vpon their shoulder, which cometh vnder their arme, wherewith ...
— The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, - and Discoveries of The English Nation, Volume 10 - Asia, Part III • Richard Hakluyt

... for my Catholic errors, I suppose," said Miss Vernon, laughing.—"Well, I thank you for the information, Mr. Jobson, and will hie me home as fast as I can, and be a better housekeeper in time coming. Good-night, my dear Mr. Jobson, thou ...
— Rob Roy, Complete, Illustrated • Sir Walter Scott

... old for that, Mr. Gerardo. Long before a week, as measured by your chronology, has elapsed, I shall lie beneath the sod. I've been put off that way too often. (Bringing down his fist on the piano.) Hie Rhodus! Hie salta! It's five years ago now that I called on the manager of the Royal Theatre, Count Zedlitz: "What have you got for me, my dearest professor?" "An opera, your Excellency." "Indeed, you have written ...
— The German Classics, v. 20 - Masterpieces of German Literature • Various

... klar: Institutsvorsteherin nebst drei Pflegebefohlenen. Die letzteren muten wohl von denen[6-6] sein, die zur geringen Freude der ersteren auch die groen Ferien dableiben, weil ihre Eltern selbst verreist sind. Anna, Lina und Elsa hieen die drei Mdchen, die immer lachten, wenn[6-7] sie der Blick ihrer Hterin nicht traf. Denn alles kam ihnen lcherlich vor. Jugendlust und Freude, Unschuld und Kindlichkeit schauten aus den[6-8] Augen, sie schienen so froh, dem[6-9] Schulszepter ...
— Eingeschneit - Eine Studentengeschichte • Emil Frommel

... of steady swimming, his soft young strength would collapse. A howl of terror would apprise the world at large that he was about to drown. Whereat some passing boatman would pick him up and hold him for ransom, or else some one from The Place must jump into skiff or canoe and hie with all speed to the rescue. The same thing would be ...
— Bruce • Albert Payson Terhune

... my heart engage, I would worry to death of this gilded cage And the high close walls of each darkened room, Heavy with stifling, close perfume; Back to the free, fresh woods let me hie, Amid them ...
— The Poetical Works of Mrs. Leprohon (Mrs. R.E. Mullins) • Rosanna Eleanor Leprohon

... facto absolute in power, his children by Queen Ahmasi took precedence of him, for by her mother's descent she had a better right to the crown than her husband, and legally the king should have retired in favour of hie sons as soon as they were old enough to reign. The eldest of them, Uazmosu, died early.* The second, Amenmosu, lived at least to attain adolescence; he was allowed to share the crown with his father from the fourth ...
— History Of Egypt, Chaldaea, Syria, Babylonia, and Assyria, Volume 4 (of 12) • G. Maspero

... weep, oh weep, ye Scottish dames, Weep till ye blin' a mither's e'e; Nae reeking ha' in fifty miles, But naked corses, sad to see. Oh spring is blithesome to the year, Trees sprout, flowers spring, and birds sing hie; But oh! what spring can raise them up, ...
— The Modern Scottish Minstrel, Volume III - The Songs of Scotland of the Past Half Century • Various

... soft the winds blow, 125 When clear falls the moonlight, When spring-tides are low; When sweet airs come seaward From heaths starr'd with broom, deg. deg.129 And high rocks throw mildly 130 On the blanch'd sands a gloom; Up the still, glistening beaches, Up the creeks we will hie, Over banks of bright seaweed The ebb-tide leaves dry. 135 We will gaze, from the sand-hills, At the white, sleeping town; At the church on the hill-side— And then come back down. Singing: "There dwells a loved one, 140 But cruel is she! She ...
— Matthew Arnold's Sohrab and Rustum and Other Poems • Matthew Arnold

... still, save with large, dusky wing The bird of night makes its ill-omened sound; Or moor-game, nestling 'neath th' flowery ling Low chuckle to their mates—or startled, spring Away on rustling pinions to the sky, Wheel round and round in many an airy ring, Then swooping downward to their covert hie, And, lodged beneath ...
— The Mirror Of Literature, Amusement, And Instruction, No. 391 - Vol. 14, No. 391, Saturday, September 26, 1829 • Various

... Manuel. Hie to the castle, some of ye, and bring What aid you can. Saddle the barb, and speed For the leech to the city—quick! some ...
— Life of Lord Byron, Vol. IV - With His Letters and Journals • Thomas Moore

... man shall flee and woman fail, And folly mock and hope deceive, Let cowards beat the breast and wail, I'll homeward hie; I will not grieve: I'll draw the blind, I'll there set free My ...
— The Judgment House • Gilbert Parker

... gar spindrift flee Abune the clachan, faddumes hie, Whan for the cluds I canna see The bonny lift, I'd fain indite an odd to thee ...
— Robert Louis Stevenson • Margaret Moyes Black

... enemies; that you can not live at court with a jaundiced countenance. Heigh-ho! Alackaday! You should hie yourself back to the woods and barren wastes of Friedwald, ...
— Under the Rose • Frederic Stewart Isham

... yore, and on field much sorrow has wrought. Against his sore dints ye may not defend you' (ll. 2069-2117). Therefore, good Sir Gawayne, let the man alone, and for God's sake go by some other path, and then I shall hie me home again. ...
— Sir Gawayne and the Green Knight - An Alliterative Romance-Poem (c. 1360 A.D.) • Anonymous

... thy past misdeeds and the craft and perfidy thou didst imagine against me and bethink thee how near thou art to being stoned to death. For know that thy soul is about the world to quit and cease in it and depart from it; so shalt thou to destruction hie and ill is the abiding-place thou shalt aby!"[FN153] Rejoined the wolf, "O Father of the Fortlet, hasten to return to amity and persist not in this rancorous enmity. Know that whoso from ruin saveth a soul, is as if he had quickened it and made ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 3 • Richard F. Burton

... That bringen light unto this earth, And go so swift upon the heaven, In four and twenty houres even, The carte with the brighte sun They drawen, so that over run They have under the circles high, All midde earth in such an hie.[7] ...
— Specimens with Memoirs of the Less-known British Poets, Complete • George Gilfillan

... night! Now all things lie Hid by her mantle dark and dim, In pious hope I hither hie, And humbly ...
— The Paris Sketch Book Of Mr. M. A. Titmarsh • William Makepeace Thackeray

... our pipes. I fear she did pass from our minds, but we had many things to talk over in those last hours. I promise you I will go up to-night and explain. Tell Weston about that fox on Gander Knob—of course I shall. School starts tomorrow, else I'd be after him myself; but on Saturday we'll hie to the mountain, Weston and Captain and I. You, Tim, shall have the skin, a memento of the valley. I'll say good-by to Captain again, and I'll keep the guns oiled, and Piney Carter shall have the rifle whenever he wants it—provided ...
— The Soldier of the Valley • Nelson Lloyd

... individuality. In a letter of Elizabeth to her brother Edward VI, long-before "Euphues" was written, occurs the following passage: "Like as a shipman in stormy wether plukes down the sails tarrying for bettar winde, so did I, most noble kinge, in my unfortunate chanche a Thursday pluk downe the hie sailes of my joy and comforte, and do trust one day that as troublesome waves have repulsed me backwarde, so a gentil winde will bringe me forwarde to my haven."[58] This is a moderate specimen of the ornate and exaggerated language which was following the new acquisitions of learning and intelligence, ...
— A History of English Prose Fiction • Bayard Tuckerman

... rises around all things. Iggdrasill, the great Ash Tree of Existence, totters, but stands. All below perishes. Finally, the unnamable Mighty One appears, to judge the good and the bad. The former hie from fading Valhalla to eternal Gimle, where all joy is to be theirs forever; the latter are stormed down from Hela to Nastrond, there, "under curdling mists, in a snaky marsh whose waves freeze black and ...
— The Destiny of the Soul - A Critical History of the Doctrine of a Future Life • William Rounseville Alger

... out my sight, Nor dare attempt such joy to blight, Thou evil wicked-doing doit, Then hie away, Seek not the morning, but the ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction, No. 388 - Vol. 14, No. 388, Saturday, September 5, 1829. • Various

... to sing throuw, Len' me yer wings to gang hie, And I'll sing ye a sang a laverock to cow, And for ...
— Heather and Snow • George MacDonald

... fledged and with them hie Where costly day drops down in crimson light? (Fortunate countries of the firefly Swarm with blue diamonds all the ...
— Poems by Jean Ingelow, In Two Volumes, Volume I. • Jean Ingelow

... she must be, Where first my loue into the world was brought. Vnhappy borne, of all vnhappy day! So luckles was my Babes nativity, Saturne chiefe Lord of the Ascendant lay, The wandring Moone in earths triplicitie. Now, or by chaunce or heauens hie prouidence, His Mother died, and by her Legacie (Fearing the stars presaging influence) Bequeath'd his wardship to my soueraignes eye; Where hunger-staruen, wanting lookes to liue, Still empty gorg'd, with cares consumption ...
— Minor Poems of Michael Drayton • Michael Drayton

... angles matters little. An enemy there must be, and the worst boy in Japan would die before he would even play at being a Russian! If Kuropatkin could see just one of these awful onslaughts, he would run up the white flag and hie himself to safety. So you see we are well guarded and with quiet little soldiers on the outside, and very noisy and fierce little soldiers on the inside, we fear no invasion of our ...
— Lady of the Decoration • Frances Little

... dark spell that about her clings, Sick desires of forbidden things The soul of her rend and sever; The bitter tide of calamity Hath risen above her lips; and she, Where bends she her last endeavour? She will hie her alone to her bridal room, And a rope swing slow in the rafters' gloom; And a fair white neck shall creep to the noose, A-shudder with dread, yet firm to choose The one strait way for fame, and lose The Love and ...
— Hippolytus/The Bacchae • Euripides

... with a perfectly respectful regret, but with the air of a man who has his title to be heard, and is acting simply in hie own clear right. The Seraph listened, restless, impatient, sorely tried to keep in the passion which had been awakened by the hint that this wretched matter could concern or attaint the honor of ...
— Under Two Flags • Ouida [Louise de la Ramee]

... soft and skies are fair, I steal an hour from study and care, And hie me away to the woodland scene, Where wanders the stream with waters of green, As if the bright fringe of herbs on its brink Had given their stain to the waves they drink; And they, whose meadows it murmurs through, Have named the stream from its own fair hue. Yet pure its waters—its shallows are ...
— Poetical Works of William Cullen Bryant - Household Edition • William Cullen Bryant

... half, yes all, a man— It is their faults that make them woman-kind. And that resistance, which the oft deceived Gains through experience, the King has not; A light disport he takes for bitter earn'st. But this shall not endure, I warrant thee! The foe is at the borders, and the King Shall hie him where long since he ought to be; Myself shall lead him hence. And so ...
— The German Classics of The Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, Vol. VI. • Editor-in-Chief: Kuno Francke

... at this instant a fairy-like thing in white glided past the youth, and whispered, "Heed her not, she is an evil genius! Hie thee, young man, for shelter to yonder wood; from its leafy shade thou canst behold the lovely earth with its verdant meadows, rich foliage and brilliant flowers, and the soft, fleecy clouds embracing one ...
— Fifty-Two Stories For Girls • Various

... protection. Do my behest. My mind misgiveth me. The king may come to grief. Yoking Nala's favourite horses endued with the fleetness of the mind, do thou take these twins (my son and daughter) on the car and hie thou to Kundina. Leaving the children there with my kindred as also the car and the horses, either stay thou there, or go to any other place as it listeth thee." Varshneya, the charioteer of Nala, then reported in detail these words of Damayanti ...
— Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa Bk. 3 Pt. 1 • Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa

... of Love is not Cupidity, but Cupid. Perchance 'tis well, for had I wed That maid of dark-brown curls, You had not been, or been, instead Of boy, a pair of girls. Now listen to me, Walter Smith; Hie to yon plumber bold, An thou would'st ease my dying pang, His 'prentice be enrolled. For Jones has houses many on The fashionable squares, And thou, perchance, may'st be called in To see to the repairs. Think on thy father's ravished love. Recall thy father's ...
— Humour of the North • Lawrence J. Burpee

... Then hie thee to some bonny brake Another mate to woo and take, And as thy soul to love. Rise with the dew, stay not the noon, What's good cannot be found too soon, The wind will not be always south, Nor like a rose is every mouth, Time's quick to press, Do thou no less, And ...
— Path Flower and Other Verses • Olive T. Dargan

... King is stately, looking hie; The Queene doth beare like maiestie: The Knight is hardie, valiant, wise: The Bishop prudent and precise. The Rookes no raungers out of raie[CX], The Pawnes the pages ...
— Microcosmography - or, a Piece of the World Discovered; in Essays and Characters • John Earle

... agreed, under Rob's direction, to set to work at once. So Rob bade his brothers and cousin get their rude fishing rods, and hie away down to the rocks at the mouth of the harbor, and see what fish they could get for him during ...
— The New McGuffey Fourth Reader • William H. McGuffey

... to isle ofeel-field Dight am I to hie me: Give, O God, thy singer With glaive to end the striving. Here shall I the head cleave Of Helga's love's devourer, At last my bright sword bringeth Sundering of ...
— The Story Of Gunnlaug The Worm-Tongue And Raven The Skald - 1875 • Anonymous

... And the Rommany girl To-morrow shall hie To poison the sty, And bewitch on the mead The ...
— George Borrow - The Man and His Books • Edward Thomas

... hush-a-ba birdie, croon, croon, Hush-a-ba birdie, croon; The gaits are gane to the mountain hie, And they'll no be hame till noon, And they'll no be ...
— Children's Rhymes, Children's Games, Children's Songs, Children's Stories - A Book for Bairns and Big Folk • Robert Ford

... Gamba. Hie to me, fly to me, steel-blue mate! Under my breast-knot flutters thy fellow; Here can I rest not, and thou so late. Home, to me, home! 'Love, love, I come!' —Dear one, I wait! Quanno nacesti tu, nacqui pur io: La lundananza tua, 'l desiderio mio! You know ...
— The Vigil of Venus and Other Poems by "Q" • Q

... the auld troublesome time byepast. And Mrs. Glass has been kind like my very mother. She has a braw house here, and lives bien and warm, wi' twa servant lasses, and a man and a callant in the shop. And she is to send you doun a pound of her hie-dried, and some other tobaka, and we maun think of some propine for her, since her kindness hath been great. And the Duk is to send the pardon doun by an express messenger, in respect that I canna travel sae fast; and I am to come doun wi' twa of his Honour's servants—that is, John ...
— Sir Walter Scott - (English Men of Letters Series) • Richard H. Hutton

... "we have no long time to bide with you, lest the new Duke come upon us. We must hie us back to our lodging with the Bishop Peter, lest we ...
— Red Axe • Samuel Rutherford Crockett

... him, and he is not a man to forget a favor, though he is somewhat changed since the time I first saw him. He was then a fiery youth, for all he can look so grave at times now. He hath some credit, for it was by his intercession with the Governor that my imprisonment was shortened. I will hie me to him, and hear what he advises, more especially as he hath sent for me. And I bethink me, Prudence, it were no bad thing, if he can do so much, to get him to speak a word ...
— The Knight of the Golden Melice - A Historical Romance • John Turvill Adams

... Andreas jacet hie Pisanus in urna, Marmore qui potuit spirantes ducere vultus Et simulacra Deum mediis imponere templis Ex acre, ex auro, ...
— The Lives of the Painters, Sculptors & Architects, Volume 1 (of 8) • Giorgio Vasari

... Gow (stabs him). Thus! Hie after the Prince and tell him y'are the first fruits of his nectarine tree. Bleed ...
— Songs from Books • Rudyard Kipling

... is the beast to fight, He leaps along the plain, And if you run with all your might, He runs with all his mane. I'm glad I'm not a Hottentot, But if I were, with outward cal-lum I'd either faint upon the spot Or hie me up a ...
— A Nonsense Anthology • Collected by Carolyn Wells

... that we set off, and we overtook the wind that was before us, and the wind that was behind us did not overtake us. And we never stopped till we came to the sea. Then every one of us said: 'Hie over cap! Hie over cap!' and Guleesh said it after us, and the next second we was all up in the air, and we never stopped till we was in Rome. And why the whole tribe wanted to go by the way of Rome, never a know I know, for it's not on the way ...
— Fairies and Folk of Ireland • William Henry Frost

... your hie Croce, where gold and silk Should be, there is but curds and milk, And at your Tron but cokill and wilk, Pansches, puddings, of Jok and Jame. Think ye not shame Kin as the world sayis that ilk In hurt ...
— Royal Edinburgh - Her Saints, Kings, Prophets and Poets • Margaret Oliphant

... sports, his pleasures, and his company?— Yet, ere thou go, see how I do divorce [Embraces young Spenser. Spenser from thee. Now get thee to thy lords, And tell them I will come to chastise them For murdering Gaveston: hie thee, get thee gone! Edward, with fire and sword, follows at thy heels. [Exit Herald. My lord[s], perceive you how these rebels swell?— Soldiers, good hearts! defend your sovereign's right, For, now, even now, we march ...
— Edward II. - Marlowe's Plays • Christopher Marlowe

... and slue the lord Persie, called sir Henrie Hotspurre. To conclude, the kings enimies were vanquished, and put to flight, in which flight, the earle of Dowglas, for hast, falling from the crag of an hie mounteine, [Sidenote: The earle Dowglas taken prisoner.] brake one of his cullions, and was taken, and for his valiantnesse, of the king ...
— Chronicles (3 of 6): Historie of England (1 of 9) - Henrie IV • Raphael Holinshed

... loves the storm, That, borne on Terror's desolating wings, Shakes the high forest, or remorseless flings The shivered surge; when rising griefs deform Thy peaceful breast, hie to yon steep, and think,— When thou dost mark the melancholy tide Beneath thee, and the storm careering wide,— Tossed on the surge of life how many sink! And if thy cheek with one kind tear be wet, And if thy heart be smitten, ...
— The Poetical Works of William Lisle Bowles, Vol. 1 • William Lisle Bowles

... this t'other letter. Well, and so who do you think this t'other letter was from? Well, and so I'll tell you; it was from little MD, N.23, 23, 23, 23. I tell you it is no more, I have told you so before: but I just looked again to satisfy you. Hie, Stella, you write like an emperor, a great deal together; a very good hand, and but four false spellings in all. Shall I send them to you? I am glad you did not take my correction ill. Well, but I won't answer your letter now, sirrah ...
— The Journal to Stella • Jonathan Swift

... I lie and wait Until the papers come at eight. I skim them with an anxious eye Ere duly to my bath I hie, Postponing till I'm fully dressed My study of the daily pest. Then, seated at my frugal board, My rasher served, my tea outpoured, I disentangle news official From reams of comment unjudicial, Until at half-past ...
— Punch or the London Charivari, Vol. 147, December 9, 1914 • Various

... with Dorcas's story, answered and said, 'Hasten, O damsel, who in a happy moment art come to put it in my power to serve the innocent and virtuous, which it has always been my delight to do: hasten to this young lady, and bid her hie hither to me with all speed; and tell her, that my chariot shall be her asylum: and if I find all that thou sayest true, my house shall be her sanctuary, and I will protect ...
— Clarissa, Volume 6 (of 9) - The History Of A Young Lady • Samuel Richardson

... o'clock, and we was speaking (but about lawful things) when we heard some ane running yont the road. I keeked through a hole in the door, and I saw it was an Egyptian lassie 'at I had never clapped een on afore. She saw the licht in the window, and she cried, 'Hie, you billies in the windmill, the sojers is coming!' I fell in a fricht, but the other man opened the door, and again she cries, 'The sojers is coming; quick, or you'll be ta'en.' At that the other man up wi' his bonnet and ran, but I ...
— The Little Minister • J.M. Barrie



Words linked to "Hie" :   dash, shoot down, flash, shoot, move, push forward, tear, dart, travel, go, charge, scoot, scud, linger, barge, buck, thrust ahead, locomote



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