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Get   /gɛt/  /gɪt/   Listen
Get

verb
(past got, obs. gat; past part. got or gotten; pres. part. getting)
1.
Come into the possession of something concrete or abstract.  Synonym: acquire.  "They acquired a new pet" , "Get your results the next day" , "Get permission to take a few days off from work"
2.
Enter or assume a certain state or condition.  Synonyms: become, go.  "It must be getting more serious" , "Her face went red with anger" , "She went into ecstasy" , "Get going!"
3.
Cause to move; cause to be in a certain position or condition.  Synonyms: have, let.  "This let me in for a big surprise" , "He got a girl into trouble"
4.
Receive a specified treatment (abstract).  Synonyms: find, incur, obtain, receive.  "His movie received a good review" , "I got nothing but trouble for my good intentions"
5.
Reach a destination; arrive by movement or progress.  Synonyms: arrive, come.  "She didn't get to Chicago until after midnight"
6.
Go or come after and bring or take back.  Synonyms: bring, convey, fetch.  "Could you bring the wine?" , "The dog fetched the hat"
7.
Go through (mental or physical states or experiences).  Synonyms: experience, have, receive.  "Experience vertigo" , "Get nauseous" , "Receive injuries" , "Have a feeling"
8.
Take vengeance on or get even.  Synonyms: fix, pay back, pay off.  "That'll fix him good!" , "This time I got him"
9.
Achieve a point or goal.  Synonyms: have, make.  "The Brazilian team got 4 goals" , "She made 29 points that day"
10.
Cause to do; cause to act in a specified manner.  Synonyms: cause, have, induce, make, stimulate.  "My children finally got me to buy a computer" , "My wife made me buy a new sofa"
11.
Succeed in catching or seizing, especially after a chase.  Synonyms: capture, catch.  "Did you catch the thief?"
12.
Come to have or undergo a change of (physical features and attributes).  Synonyms: acquire, develop, grow, produce.  "The patient developed abdominal pains" , "I got funny spots all over my body" , "Well-developed breasts"
13.
Be stricken by an illness, fall victim to an illness.  Synonyms: contract, take.  "She came down with pneumonia" , "She took a chill"
14.
Communicate with a place or person; establish communication with, as if by telephone.  "The operator couldn't get Kobe because of the earthquake"
15.
Give certain properties to something.  Synonym: make.  "She made us look silly" , "He made a fool of himself at the meeting" , "Don't make this into a big deal" , "This invention will make you a millionaire" , "Make yourself clear"
16.
Move into a desired direction of discourse.  Synonyms: aim, drive.
17.
Grasp with the mind or develop an understanding of.  Synonym: catch.  "We caught something of his theory in the lecture" , "Don't catch your meaning" , "Did you get it?" , "She didn't get the joke" , "I just don't get him"
18.
Attract and fix.  Synonyms: arrest, catch.  "She caught his eye" , "Catch the attention of the waiter"
19.
Reach with a blow or hit in a particular spot.  Synonym: catch.  "The blow got him in the back" , "The punch caught him in the stomach"
20.
Reach by calculation.
21.
Acquire as a result of some effort or action.  "Where did she get these news?"
22.
Purchase.
23.
Perceive by hearing.  Synonym: catch.  "She didn't get his name when they met the first time"
24.
Suffer from the receipt of.  Synonym: catch.
25.
Receive as a retribution or punishment.  Synonym: receive.
26.
Leave immediately; used usually in the imperative form.  Synonyms: bugger off, buzz off, fuck off, scram.
27.
Reach and board.
28.
Irritate.  Synonym: get under one's skin.  "His lying really gets me"
29.
Evoke an emotional response.
30.
Apprehend and reproduce accurately.  Synonym: catch.  "She got the mood just right in her photographs"
31.
Earn or achieve a base by being walked by the pitcher.  Synonym: draw.
32.
Overcome or destroy.  "The cat got the goldfish"
33.
Be a mystery or bewildering to.  Synonyms: amaze, baffle, beat, bewilder, dumbfound, flummox, gravel, mystify, nonplus, perplex, pose, puzzle, stick, stupefy, vex.  "Got me--I don't know the answer!" , "A vexing problem" , "This question really stuck me"
34.
Take the first step or steps in carrying out an action.  Synonyms: begin, commence, get down, set about, set out, start, start out.  "Who will start?" , "Get working as soon as the sun rises!" , "The first tourists began to arrive in Cambodia" , "He began early in the day" , "Let's get down to work now"
35.
Undergo (as of injuries and illnesses).  Synonyms: have, suffer, sustain.  "He had an insulin shock after eating three candy bars" , "She got a bruise on her leg" , "He got his arm broken in the scuffle"
36.
Make children.  Synonyms: beget, bring forth, engender, father, generate, mother, sire.  "Men often father children but don't recognize them"



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"Get" Quotes from Famous Books



... in this country. At a meeting of this body it was complacently announced that "the Committee had obtained the removal of the posters of an anti-Semitic paper from the walls of an important establishment, and steps had been taken to get others removed."—Jewish Guardian, February 22, 1924. We wonder whether the Welsh would be able to obtain the removal of posters advertising literature of an anti-Celtic nature. This comes perilously near to a fulfilment ...
— Secret Societies And Subversive Movements • Nesta H. Webster

... it would come to that," she said, with some indignation in her voice. "It's nice to feel that you can't trust me out of your sight. Don't you think that if you really loved me as you say you'd be as glad as I was that I could get a better education? But of course, if you're afraid to trust me, why, I suppose I can give ...
— A Williams Anthology - A Collection of the Verse and Prose of Williams College, 1798-1910 • Compiled by Edwin Partridge Lehman and Julian Park

... the beginning of Revelation, were probably all evangelized from Ephesus by converts of St. Paul, though he himself may have visited none of them but Ephesus. The passion burned continually in his mind to get forward and cover new ground. He could not bear to build on another man's foundation. The wide unfulfilled provinces of his ...
— The Preacher and His Models - The Yale Lectures on Preaching 1891 • James Stalker

... implicitly. She was sure that she would love him till the last moment of her life. With this thought in her heart, with his name on her lips, the while she clutched Perigal's ring, which Miss Toombs's generosity had enabled her to get out of pawn, she ...
— Sparrows - The Story of an Unprotected Girl • Horace W. C. Newte

... even too rich and too powerful. A productive nature[17] ought not to read more than one of his dramas in a year if it would not be wrecked entirely. I did well to get rid of him by writing Goetz, and Egmont,[18] and Byron did well by not having too much respect and admiration for him, but going his own way. How many excellent Germans have been ...
— The German Classics of The Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, Vol. II • Editor-in-Chief: Kuno Francke

... managed to get through the starting without his feeling any annoyance at her presence. He had simply forgotten his ...
— There was a King in Egypt • Norma Lorimer

... waters of the Kalamazoo. This done, the bee-hunter desired the women to embark, and called to the Chippewa to do the same. By quitting the spot in the canoes, it was evident the pursuers would be balked, temporarily at least, since they must recross the marsh in order to get into their own boats, without which further pursuit ...
— Oak Openings • James Fenimore Cooper

... politics. But now you are going to be the queen of our little festival. Listen, Doris! All the political buzzing bees will be thinning out, right soon. Those elderly gentlemen from the country who shook hands with a good Grange grip—they'll be wanting to get plenty of sleep so as to be wide awake to-morrow to hear the Governor's inaugural address. The other vigorous gentlemen who are so deeply in politics will be hurrying back to their hotels for their caucuses, ...
— All-Wool Morrison • Holman Day

... culture than that yielded by science alone, it is to be recollected that the improvement of manufacturing processes is only one of the conditions which contribute to the prosperity of industry. Industry is a means and not an end; and mankind work only to get something which they want. What that something is depends partly on their innate, and partly ...
— Harvard Classics Volume 28 - Essays English and American • Various

... stone trough about two feet into a stream below, at particular seasons of the year, a great number of little fish called minums, or pinks, throw themselves about twenty times their own length out of the water, expecting to get ...
— Zoonomia, Vol. I - Or, the Laws of Organic Life • Erasmus Darwin

... would not you insist on more? Would you be contented with a kiss? Would not your inclinations be all on fire rather by such a favour?" "Madam," said Joseph, "if they were, I hope I should be able to controul them, without suffering them to get the better of my virtue." You have heard, reader, poets talk of the statue of Surprize; you have heard likewise, or else you have heard very little, how Surprize made one of the sons of Croesus speak, though he was dumb. You have seen ...
— Joseph Andrews Vol. 1 • Henry Fielding

... particularly useful at this season of the year to men in cities: to all repetitive men: to the men that read these words. What is more, true as it is and useful as it is, no amount of hammering at people seems to get this theme into their practice; though it has long ago entered into their convictions they will not act upon it in their summers. And this true and useful theme is the theme of little freedoms and discoveries, the ...
— First and Last • H. Belloc

... case it is hardly possible to exaggerate the waste of time, money and trouble that has been caused, by his not having been content to appear as descending with modification like other people from those who went before him. It will take years to get the evolution theory out of the mess in which Mr. Darwin has left it. He was heir to a discredited truth; he left behind him an accredited fallacy. Mr. Romanes, if he is not stopped in time, will get the theory ...
— Luck or Cunning? • Samuel Butler

... very critical gray eyes. "Tell ye what, old man!—if you don't quit this dog-goned foolin' of yours in that God-forsaken tunnel you'll get loony! Times you get so tangled up in follerin' that blind lead o' yours ...
— A Millionaire of Rough-and-Ready • Bret Harte

... moment it appeared that French influence had decisively prevailed at Constantinople, and that the troops of the Czar had been summoned from Sebastopol only to be dismissed with the ironical compliments of those who were most anxious to get rid of them. But this was not really the case. Whether the fluctuations in the Sultan's policy had been due to mere fear and irresolution, or whether they had to some extent proceeded from the desire to play off one Power against another, ...
— History of Modern Europe 1792-1878 • C. A. Fyffe

... British were first made out, Arnold's second in command, Waterbury, urged that in view of the enemy's superiority the flotilla should get under way at once, and fight them "on a retreat in the main lake;" the harbour being disadvantageous "to fight a number so much superior, and the enemy being able to surround us on every side, we lying between an island and the main." Waterbury's advice evidently found ...
— The Major Operations of the Navies in the War of American Independence • A. T. Mahan

... he retorted, with a grin. "Don't forget that. The inventors will all come flocking straight to us to get them out of their difficulties—you ...
— The Confessions of Artemas Quibble • Arthur Train

... silvered buckle—and nobody but the crow himself knows how to find it. Did some crow fetch his best trinket for the occasion, or was this a special thing for games, and kept by the flock where any crow could get it? ...
— Ways of Wood Folk • William J. Long

... to his house, and took his old father Anchises on his back, giving him his Penates, or little images of household gods, to take care of, and led by the hand his little son Iulus, or Ascanius, while his wife Creusa followed close behind, and all the Trojans who could get their arms together joined him, so that they escaped in a body to Mount Ida; but just as they were outside the city he missed poor Creusa, and though he rushed back and searched for her everywhere, he never could find her. For the sake of his care for his gods, and ...
— Young Folks' History of Rome • Charlotte Mary Yonge

... old I am?" he said. "I'm forty-two years old. Maybe I don't look it, but that's how old I am. Now, I've spent all my life learning to do one thing, and I do a pretty good job of it. Anyhow, good enough to get me a spot with Wrout's show, and probably with anybody else I ...
— Charley de Milo • Laurence Mark Janifer AKA Larry M. Harris

... his shoulders. "No use expecting mother to let me keep him in quarters, and the C. O. won't have 'em around the hangars. I guess I will have to give him back to Lee and let him get rid ...
— Battling the Clouds - or, For a Comrade's Honor • Captain Frank Cobb

... campaign for volunteers does not produce that number, it will be necessary by additional legislation to extend the Selective Service Act beyond May 16, the date of expiration under existing law. That is the only way we can get the men and bring back our veterans. There is no other way. Action along this line should not be postponed beyond March, in order ...
— Complete State of the Union Addresses from 1790 to the Present • Various

... these motives which I have named; they all appeal to you in regard to Holiness. It is the will of God concerning you. It is desirable and necessary to give your religion power with those around you. It is also to your own happiness and interest to get your nature sanctified and your own heart and mind and life brought into harmony with God. To those whose experience includes the enjoyment of the blessing, I say let these motives influence you in maintaining the conditions. And to those who have not got the blessing, let these motives ...
— Standards of Life and Service • T. H. Howard

... but four of us left and your mother, and the mate was in a very bad state of health; he fretted very much, poor fellow, for he had left a young wife in England, and what he appeared to fear most was, that she would be married again before he could get home. It ended in a confirmed liver complaint, which carried him off nine months afterwards; and thus was one more of our companions disposed of. He died very quietly, and gave me his sleeve-buttons and watch to deliver to his wife, if ever I should escape from the island. ...
— The Little Savage • Captain Frederick Marryat

... get more attention than I do from my soldier. You at least have the consolation of knowing you're the ...
— Her Own Way - A Play in Four Acts • Clyde Fitch

... my three years study abroad when mother's illness brought me home. I was fortunate enough to get one on the line, and they say—over there—that I had a good chance. I don't know how it will go here at home." There was a note of anxiety in ...
— The Eyes of the World • Harold Bell Wright

... the solicitor. "He seems to take an interest in the family, and being rich, and apparently only anxious to enhance the family prestige, you ought to know him. Now, in reference to those mortgages on Appleby Farm, if you could get"— ...
— Tales of Trail and Town • Bret Harte

... Mr. Stevens said: "If you should take away the right which now is and always has been exercised by the States, by fixing the qualifications of their electors, instead of getting nineteen States, which is necessary to ratify this amendment, you might possibly get five. I venture to say you could not get five in this Union. And that is an answer, in the opinion of the committee, to all that has been said on this subject. But it grants no right. It says, however, to the State of South ...
— History of the Thirty-Ninth Congress of the United States • Wiliam H. Barnes

... Pralamba carries Balarama. He runs so fast that he quickly outstrips the others. As he reaches the forest, he changes size, becoming 'large as a black hill.' He is about to kill Balarama when Balarama himself rains blows upon him and kills him instead.[23] While this is happening, the cows get lost, another forest fire ensues and Krishna has once again to intervene. He extinguishes the fire, regains the cattle and escorts the cowherds to their homes.[24] When the others hear what has happened, they are filled with wonder 'but ...
— The Loves of Krishna in Indian Painting and Poetry • W. G. Archer

... accomplish not this thing thou wilt trouble the whole host of the Greeks. For know that without this man's bow thou canst not take the city of Troy; know also that thou only canst approach him without peril, not being of the number of those who sailed with him at the first. And if it please thee not to get the bow by stealth, for this indeed thou must do—and I know thee to be one that loveth not to speak falsely or to contrive deceit—yet bethink thee that victory is sweet. Be thou bold to-day, and ...
— Stories from the Greek Tragedians • Alfred Church

... 'ere perjury made me feel uncomfortable; and what with having sworn vengeance on Clapp and Hopgood, I made up my mind to go straight back to Philadelphy, and turn state's evidence. I was waiting for a chance to get to New York when I saw you on the wharf at Nantucket, and I ...
— Elinor Wyllys - Vol. I • Susan Fenimore Cooper

... brethren, how the Almighty weaves His threads together. After the repentant sinner had confessed all to me, and explained how the Cossacks were to be sent to catch all the community assembled helpless in synagogue, I deemed it best merely to get the bottles changed back again. The false bottle contained only bullock's blood, but it would have sufficed to madden the multitude. Since it is I who have the blessed privilege of supplying the Consecration wine it was easy enough to give Maimon another bottle, and armed with this he roused the ...
— Ghetto Comedies • Israel Zangwill

... her hands with exultation, and there was a regular chatter of eager voices—'I should like to know how you would get the hackles out of a ...
— Hopes and Fears - scenes from the life of a spinster • Charlotte M. Yonge

... In ground-plan this is simply composed geometrically of a rectangle divided diagonally into four equal parts, and by striking four semicircles from the centres of the four sides of the rectangle. Here we get a form of ornament in the flat which appears to have been very widely used, and reappears in the early art of nearly all races so far as I am aware. We find it, for instance, in Assyrian carving and in early Greek decoration, in China and Japan, ...
— Line and Form (1900) • Walter Crane

... that out; she knew better; she was only trying to cheat herself. "I too shall be happy." Not that, not some other man's wife,—the thought was demoniacal. He caught his reflection in the glass in passing. "I must get out of this," he laughed with dry, parched lips. He seized his hat and went out. The wind was blowing stiffly; for hours he wrestled with it, and then came home ...
— Other Things Being Equal • Emma Wolf

... said his wife. "I never thought they would soon get one to step so readily into auld Kirstin's shoon. She gets through far mair than ever Kirstin did in the course of the day, and the hoose is like a new ...
— Allison Bain - By a Way she knew not • Margaret Murray Robertson

... important business just at present," was George's answer; "but I can tell you far better than he can what nonsense the atmospheric system is: Robert's good-natured, you see, and if your Lordship were to get alongside of him you might talk him over; so you have been quite lucky in meeting with me. Now, just look at the question of expense,"—and then he proceeded in his strong Doric to explain his views in detail, ...
— Lives of the Engineers - The Locomotive. George and Robert Stephenson • Samuel Smiles

... to go with him. M. d'Aubray, who supposed her relations with Sainte-Croix to be quite broken off, joyfully accepted. Offemont was exactly the place for a crime of this nature. In the middle of the forest of Aigue, three or four miles from Compiegne, it would be impossible to get efficient help before the rapid action of the poison had ...
— CELEBRATED CRIMES, COMPLETE - THE MARQUISE DE BRINVILLIERS • ALEXANDRE DUMAS, PERE

... mountains. If there is a big river below, some of these valleys must run down to it. Their waters probably flow to the Columbia. The Indians talk of salmon and of white men—they have heard of goods which must have been made by white men. We are in touch with the Pacific here. I'll get a guide and explore off to the southwest. It ...
— The Magnificent Adventure - Being the Story of the World's Greatest Exploration and - the Romance of a Very Gallant Gentleman • Emerson Hough

... His only creed is to believe simply in the Saviour of sinners. "He" (the chaplain) "says to me—'Just believe in Jesus like you do in Andrew Jackson and you'll be right in the course of time. Believe that what He said was true, an' get your mind full of what He said, an' keep it full.'"—John ...
— Character Sketches of Romance, Fiction and the Drama - A Revised American Edition of the Reader's Handbook, Vol. 3 • E. Cobham Brewer

... reply, "I should get father to let me go to school here. If you'd stay and be my cousin-sister, it would be just exactly ...
— Polly of Lady Gay Cottage • Emma C. Dowd

... sun's excessive heat Make our bodies swelter, To an osier hedge we get For a friendly shelter! Where in a dike, Perch or pike, Roach or dace, We do chase, Bleak or gudgeon, Without grudging, We are still contented. Or we sometimes pass an hour Under a green willow, That defends us from a shower, Making earth our pillow; Where we may Think and pray, ...
— Dr. Johnson's Works: Life, Poems, and Tales, Volume 1 - The Works Of Samuel Johnson, Ll.D., In Nine Volumes • Samuel Johnson

... called to him the five troopers who had first fired upon the monks and said, 'Mount quickly, and ride through the woods towards the mountain, and get before these ...
— The Secret Rose • W. B. Yeats

... And look here, T. A.! We can't both leave this place for a fitting. It's absurd. If this keeps on, it will break up the business. We'll have to get married one at a time—or, at least, get our trousseaux one at a time. ...
— Emma McChesney & Co. • Edna Ferber

... "Teddy, you'll have to get back and change your clothes. The performance is about over. That makes me think. I have on my ring clothes under this suit and I must hurry back to my ...
— The Circus Boys On the Mississippi • Edgar B. P. Darlington

... their decisions in the minds of the people. A further check upon injustice was provided by the custom of the elders of the city, who sat with the judge and assisted him in the carrying out of his duties; and it was always open to a man, if he believed that he could not get justice enforced, to make an appeal to the king. It is not our present purpose to give a technical discussion of the legal contents of the code, but rather to examine it with the object of ascertaining what light it throws upon ancient Babylonian ...
— History Of Egypt, Chaldaea, Syria, Babylonia, And Assyria In The Light Of Recent Discovery • L.W. King and H.R. Hall

... lay beside him, he edged his way out along the wooden bench, moving cautiously lest he should shake the table and upset the lamp or the bottles. Annetta had turned again, at the threat he had uttered, and stood still, waiting for him to get out into the room, her hands on her hips, and ...
— Casa Braccio, Volumes 1 and 2 (of 2) • F. Marion Crawford

... I give you my word I will ask you to go no farther.—Corporal, make the men fall in, in front of the houses. Get out these gentlemen's horses; we must carry them with us. I cannot spare any men to guard them here. Come, my ...
— Rob Roy, Complete, Illustrated • Sir Walter Scott

... Signior Guest," said Giles Gosling, "if I were to travel only that I might be discontented with that which I can get at home, methinks I should go but on a fool's errand. Besides, I warrant you, there is many a fool can turn his nose up at good drink without ever having been out of the smoke of Old England; and so ...
— Kenilworth • Sir Walter Scott

... life haven't begun yet. Wait till you're a father. That cuts to the bone. You have the most delicate thing in the world in hand, a young kindred mind. You feel responsible for it, you know you are responsible for it; and you lose touch with it. You can't get at it. Nowadays we've lost the old tradition of fatherhood by divine right—and we haven't got a new one. I've tried not to be a cramping ruler, a director, a domestic tyrant to that lad—and in effect ...
— Mr. Britling Sees It Through • H. G. Wells

... climbed up into Calhoun's lap and with a determined air went to sleep there. Calhoun disturbed him long enough to get an instrument out of his pocket. He listened to Murgatroyd's ...
— This World Is Taboo • Murray Leinster

... seem as warm and friendly as a Christmas party by comparison. It was a look that froze the air of the room into a solid chunk, Malone thought, a chunk you could have chipped pieces from, for souvenirs, later, when Dr. O'Connor had gone and you could get into the room without any danger of being quick-frozen ...
— Brain Twister • Gordon Randall Garrett

... "Get thine iron pot on thy head then, friend Sluggard, as quickly as thy nature will permit," said the hermit, "while I remove these pewter flagons, whose late contents run strangely in mine own pate; and to drown the clatter—for, in faith, ...
— Ivanhoe - A Romance • Walter Scott

... with a stem and leaf similar to the last, has a root about the size of a large hickory-nut. They grow in deep water, and being smaller are much more difficult to get, but the Indians prefer them; they have an agreeable taste, and are harder and firmer when cooked. Both these roots are found in large quantities in the musk-rat lodges, stored by ...
— The Commercial Products of the Vegetable Kingdom • P. L. Simmonds

... some thoughts of joining the Total Abstinence," said Devilsdust; "ever since I read Stephen Morley's address it has been in my mind. We shall never get our rights till we leave off consuming exciseable articles; and the best thing to begin with ...
— Sybil - or the Two Nations • Benjamin Disraeli

... he also tried other experiments to protect his grain from the Hessian fly and rust. Noticing how the freezing and thawing of the ground in spring often injured the wheat by lifting it out of the ground, he adopted the practice of running a heavy roller over the wheat in order to get the roots back into the ground and he was confident that when the operation was performed at the proper time, that is when the ground was soft and the roots were still alive, it was productive ...
— George Washington: Farmer • Paul Leland Haworth

... philosophical temperament. The scribblers, who know me not, and who fill their papers with paragraphs about me, besides their want of talents, drink too many slings and drams in a morning to have any chance with me. But, poor fellows, they must do something for the little pittance they get from their employers. This is ...
— The Writings Of Thomas Paine, Complete - With Index to Volumes I - IV • Thomas Paine

... street to the other and waited complacently before every third house two minutes and a quarter while I belabored his back and reviled him in my heart; how I tried to keep him from turning corners and failed; how I moved heaven and earth to get him out of town, and did not succeed; how he traversed the entire settlement and delivered imaginary milk at a hundred and sixty-two different domiciles, and how he finally brought up at a dairy depot and refused to budge further, thus rounding and completing ...
— Innocents abroad • Mark Twain

... at the time we believed that only the bees of Seville did it, and I still doubt whether anywhere in America the morning wakes to anything like the long, rich, sad calls of the Sevillian street hucksters. It is true that you do not get this plaintive music without the accompanying note of the hucksters' donkeys, which, if they were better advised, would not close with the sort of inefficient sifflication which they now use in spoiling an otherwise most noble, most leonine roar. But when were donkeys of any sort ever well ...
— Familiar Spanish Travels • W. D. Howells

... found themselves elected to power by a vast majority in 1905, they were still seeking to get on peaceably with the Lords, but this soon proved impossible. In January of 1910 the Liberals deliberately adjourned Parliament and appealed to the people in a new election. They were again returned to power, though by a reduced ...
— The Great Events by Famous Historians, Vol. 21 - The Recent Days (1910-1914) • Charles F. Horne, Editor

... on the snow, and the traces and the sledge be smashed, deuce take them one and all! And how delightful when the sledge upsets and you go flying full tilt into a drift, face downwards in the snow, and then you get up white all over with icicles on your moustaches; no cap, no gloves, your belt undone.... People ...
— The Witch and Other Stories • Anton Chekhov

... half—the ground good, and only soft enough. In consideration, however, of his greater weight, I was to give odds in the start; and as we could not well agree on how much, it was at length decided that he was to get away first, and I to follow as fast as I could, after drinking a pewter quart full of Guinness's double stout—droll odds, you'll say, but it was the old fellow's own thought, and as the match was a soft one, I let ...
— The Confessions of Harry Lorrequer, Complete • Charles James Lever (1806-1872)

... for her knuckles be. Blest ring, thou in my mistress' hand shall lie, Myself, poor wretch, mine own gifts now envy. O would that suddenly into my gift, I could myself by secret magic shift! 10 Then would I wish thee touch my mistress' pap, And hide thy left hand underneath her lap, I would get off, though strait and sticking fast, And in her bosom strangely fall at last. Then I, that I may seal her privy leaves, Lest to the wax the hold-fast dry gem cleaves, Would first my beauteous wench's moist lips touch; Only I'll sign naught that may grieve me much. I would not out, might I ...
— The Works of Christopher Marlowe, Vol. 3 (of 3) • Christopher Marlowe

... thought that came into his head was to get out at the next gate with all speed. He ran without stopping till he came to the public church-yard; and, as it was growing dark, he resolved to pass the night on his father's tomb. It was a large edifice in the form of a dome, which Noureddin Ali built when he was alive. Bedreddin met by the way ...
— The Arabian Nights Entertainments Volume 1 • Anonymous

... she was to be called the crowd was dense to suffocation, the court-officers busy, dashing to and fro, trying to keep some orderliness among the women, who jostled each other and gave vent to loud exclamations of annoyance in their efforts to get places from which the best view might be obtained. It is curious to note the way some trivial vexation will linger in the mind, for in recalling this scene it is the annoyance I had from Mrs. MacLeod, mine landlady of the Star and Garter, that stands out clearest in ...
— Nancy Stair - A Novel • Elinor Macartney Lane

... said Hal, for he now wished to get rid of the man without more loss of time; he had gained all the information he could hope for without laying himself ...
— The Boy Allies in Great Peril • Clair W. Hayes

... some person would give the world a true history of that much-traduced and suffering people, the U.E. Loyalists; and I assure you that when your circular came I was greatly rejoiced to learn that they would at least get justice from such an able source as yourself; and if the plain narrative of the sufferings of my forefathers will assist you in the least in your arduous and praiseworthy undertaking, I will ...
— The Loyalists of America and Their Times, Vol. 2 of 2 - From 1620-1816 • Edgerton Ryerson

... supposed to be brought to him at a quarter past. The postman was really due at his hall-door at a quarter before nine; but though he had lived in the same house for above fifteen years, and though he was a man very anxious to get his letters, he had never yet learned the truth about them. He was satisfied in his ignorance with 9.15 A.M., but on this occasion the post-boy, as usual, was ten minutes after that time. Mr Whittlestaff ...
— An Old Man's Love • Anthony Trollope

... where we found a rough and ready sort of breakfast awaiting us. Thence we had a steep climb through some of the finest coffee estates in Ceylon, belonging to the Rothschilds, until we reached Rangbodde. Here there was another delay of half an hour; but although we were anxious to get on, to arrive in time for dinner, it was impossible to regret stopping amidst this lovely scenery. The house which serves as a resting-place is a wretched affair, but the view from the verandah in front is ...
— A Voyage in the 'Sunbeam' • Annie Allnut Brassey

... to get such records as you mention: Court Records of Sale, Transfer, and Freeing of Slaves, ...
— Slave Narratives, Administrative Files (A Folk History of - Slavery in the United States From Interviews with Former Slaves) • Works Projects Administration

... quite right, Miss Pellissier," he said. "He and I don't seem to get on at all with our fellow-guests, as Mrs. White calls them. You really ought not to stay here and talk to us. It is a most ...
— Anna the Adventuress • E. Phillips Oppenheim

... almost as if the jaw were broken; his old cloth cap, and his thin, short figure loosely wrapped in a long, linen dust coat. Neither Aline nor I have had the courage to remonstrate with Salomon on his get up, but when Vedder regards him I burn with the desire to discharge the creature and his car, despite our contract ...
— The Heather-Moon • C. N. Williamson and A. M. Williamson

... realm. After a long siege, lasting from July until September, he succeeded in taking Boulogne. On Thursday, the 25th September, an order was received by the Court of Aldermen from the lord chancellor, on behalf of the queen regent, to get in readiness another contingent of 500 men well harnessed and weaponed, 100 of whom were to be archers and the rest billmen. The last mentioned were to be provided with "blak bylles or morys pykes." The whole force was to be ready for shipment to Boulogne ...
— London and the Kingdom - Volume I • Reginald R. Sharpe

... business of mine," said Saurin, turning on his heel. "But if any fellow likes to get up a subscription to make good Crawley's loss, real or imaginary, I'll subscribe." And he sauntered ...
— Dr. Jolliffe's Boys • Lewis Hough

... then, whenever Nigger sees a gun in anyone's hand, he thinks it's time to bowl that man over. There's no holding him. He won't even stand for anyone pulling a handkerchief out of a hip pocket when I'm on him." Trevison grinned. "Try it, Carson, but get that boulder between you and Nigger ...
— 'Firebrand' Trevison • Charles Alden Seltzer

... of iron in the rocks at Victoria, it was impossible to get any satisfactory observation for the variation of the compass. Those obtained varied from 3/4 to ...
— Discoveries in Australia, Volume 1. • J Lort Stokes

... much where Christmas is kept, so long as all the family can get together, and all hearts be filled with His love, who came as a Babe in Bethlehem to bring blessings to the world. Under such circumstances, Christmas is a joyous time everywhere, and dear friends, meeting together for a few ...
— Grace Darling - Heroine of the Farne Islands • Eva Hope

... was left. The whites hurried back toward the river; the Indians pursued; and now commenced the slaughter with the tomahawk. The ford was narrow, and multitudes were slaughtered there. Some were trying to get to their horses; others, more fortunate, were mounted and flying; and some were plunging into the stream. In the midst of all this confusion, the Indians were ...
— The Adventures of Daniel Boone: the Kentucky rifleman • Uncle Philip

... sparkle. This is an excursion of but a few hours, and there is a little friendly, familiar, dawdling train that will con- vey you, in time for a noonday breakfast, to the small dead town where the blessed Saint-Louis twice em- barked for the crusades. You may get back to Nimes for dinner; the run - or rather the walk, for the train doesn't run - is of about an hour. I found the little journey charming, and looked out of the carriage win- dow, on my right, at the distant Cevennes, covered with tones of amber and blue, and, all around, at vineyards ...
— A Little Tour in France • Henry James

... Vikings, subdued by king Harald Harfagr; Norse influence on Gaelic; under Norway; raided by Sweyn; Norse expedition against south H. assisted by earl John; king Alexander's naval expedition; king Alexr. II sent embassy to Norway to get cession of; harried by earl of Ross; king Hakon's expedition; Scottish expedition; ceded to Scotland; conquered by Alexander III; ...
— Sutherland and Caithness in Saga-Time - or, The Jarls and The Freskyns • James Gray

... managed to get Waymark apart from the rest, and showed him a small photograph of Sally which had ...
— The Unclassed • George Gissing

... Naples, and am surprised at the sorrow I feel at quitting it, as I fear, for ever. Rode again to Astroni with Morier, and walked through the wood and tried to scale one of the sides of the mountain, but lost the path, and could only get half-way up; it is the most beautiful place about Naples. Came back by the Strada Nuova, and saw for the last time that delicious Bay with its coast and its islands, which are as deeply imprinted on my memory as if I had passed ...
— The Greville Memoirs - A Journal of the Reigns of King George IV and King William - IV, Volume 1 (of 3) • Charles C. F. Greville

... morning he rose very early and went down to the spring where the boys get the water to put in the bamboo poles and carry home. Some boys were already there, and he told them what had taken place the night before. They were all sorry that his mother had called the Ongloc, but they told him not to be afraid for they ...
— Philippine Folklore Stories • John Maurice Miller

... small and petty when the men and women who compose it can only keep their eyes on the muck of the earth instead of looking up to the crown of stars that the angel holds over their head. So that I do not fear to provoke a false pride, but rather to get rid of a false humility, when I ask you to see in this Movement, which belongs to the Great Lodge and is its child, to see in it the same forces at work that you see working in the world-history, and to realise that here also correspondences exist, and that we may guide our Movement most ...
— London Lectures of 1907 • Annie Besant

... received nine posts at once. Meanwhile France, controlling all the coasts from Bremen to Genoa, not only excluded British messengers, but carried on her diplomatic bargaining in Germany without let or hindrance. For all his trouble, Thomas Grenville could get no firm footing amidst the shifting sands of Prussian diplomacy. So nervous were the Austrian Ministers as to Prussia's future conduct that they seemed about to come to terms with France and join in ...
— William Pitt and the Great War • John Holland Rose

... guest. I hadn't even perceived Gidding until he came round to me in that precious gap of masculine intercourse that ensues upon the departure of the ladies. That gap is one of the rare opportunities for conversation men get in America. ...
— The Passionate Friends • Herbert George Wells

... preached a sermon on TIME. But what business had he to talk about time? We should like well to hear the opinions of a great man, who had made good use of time; but not of a little man, who had not used it to any purpose. I wished to get up and tell him to speak of something which he ...
— Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli, Vol. I • Margaret Fuller Ossoli

... hot and cold douching, and other measures, may be necessary to get rid of the chronic oedema, adhesions of tendons, and stiffness of ...
— Manual of Surgery - Volume First: General Surgery. Sixth Edition. • Alexis Thomson and Alexander Miles

... very ready to do a good-natured action, provided it did not cost her much exertion, nor involve expense to Theobald. Her own little purse did not matter; any one might have as much of that as he or she could get after she had reserved what was absolutely necessary for her dress. I could not hear of her end as Ernest described it to me without feeling very compassionate towards her, indeed her own son could ...
— The Way of All Flesh • Samuel Butler

... arrogated magnanimity, or anything else? I assume nothing! I have sought to efface myself while here, as far as might be. For the sake of all concerned—you, the Briscoes, les convenances, myself—I could not run away at the sight of you, like a whipped hound! But I perceive my error. I will get out of this forthwith. Heaven knows it has been ...
— The Ordeal - A Mountain Romance of Tennessee • Charles Egbert Craddock

... come to the point, for jest it is, and one you may profit by. Sit down again and fill your glass—we can enjoy the joke together. Although you do not ask for any reward, you get one—five hundred or a thousand guineas, the exact amount we can decide, but at any rate a goodly sum for two scraps of paper. I should advise you to ...
— The Brown Mask • Percy J. Brebner

... process can be clearly observed. Thus the Andhs, Kolis, Rautias and Halbas are now all Hindus, and the same remark applies to the Kols, Bhils and Korkus in several Districts. By strict abstention from beef, the adoption of Hindu rites, and to some extent of child-marriage, they get admission to the third group of castes from whom a Brahman cannot take water. It will be desirable here to digress from the main argument by noticing briefly the origin and affinities of the principal forest ...
— The Tribes and Castes of the Central Provinces of India—Volume I (of IV) • R.V. Russell

... then, is the spirit within me, which, if it once get fairly on the ladder, will mount from step to step into infinity? What are ...
— Faustus - his Life, Death, and Doom • Friedrich Maximilian von Klinger

... and Sabbath Schools of Ireland. It had often been said to me, after my addresses in the Assemblies and elsewhere, "How do you ever expect to raise L6000? It can never be accomplished, unless you call upon the rich individually, and get their larger subscriptions. Our ordinary Church people have more than enough to do with themselves. Trade ...
— The Story of John G. Paton - Or Thirty Years Among South Sea Cannibals • James Paton

... they should be granted.' 'Modest and diffident men,' writes Belford, to Lovelace, in praise of Mr. Hickman, 'wear not soon off those little precisenesses, which the confident, if ever they had them, presently get over.'** ...
— Clarissa Harlowe, Volume 9 (of 9) - The History Of A Young Lady • Samuel Richardson

... able?) in what way you proceed from these principles, and prove that to live honourably (for that is the meaning of living according to virtue, or in a manner suitable to nature) is the chief good; and in what manner, or in what place, you on a sudden get rid of the body, and leave all those things which, as they are according to nature, are out of our own power; and, lastly, how you get rid ...
— The Academic Questions • M. T. Cicero

... On the 10th do. we passed the tropic in fine weather. On the 11th do. we saw land in 21 deg. 20' S. Lat.: it was a level, low-lying coast extending to a great length, and bearing mainly south and north, falling off on both sides with high mountains; we could not get near it. Whether it was a mainland coast or islands only, is known to God alone, but from the signs seen at various times I suspect it to be a mainland. The compass has one point north-westerly variation here; we saw a good deal of sea-weed ...
— The Part Borne by the Dutch in the Discovery of Australia 1606-1765 • J. E. Heeres

... from tree to tree by means of roots in contact, and he at once cuts a ditch around the diseased area, taking care to include the recently infected and neighboring trees. Then the diseased timber is cut, because it will get worse the longer it stands, and the diseased parts burnt. If Agaricus melleus is the destroying agent, a similar procedure is necessary; but regard must be had to the much more extensive wanderings of the rhizomorphs ...
— Scientific American Supplement, No. 643, April 28, 1888 • Various

... answered. "Don't think we've forgotten you," the young radio astronomer said. "But Parnell and Kerama wasted no time in getting down to business. I doubt that you could interrupt long enough to get a sensible answer. ...
— The Egyptian Cat Mystery • Harold Leland Goodwin

... concealed her fault the more serious it became. Looking quite pale and wretched, she returned home that afternoon with a splitting headache. Her aunt was quite troubled about her, though she tried to make light of it, and Mr. Woburn said cheerily, "You must make haste and get well for to-morrow, Ruth. I suppose you will have a grand prize to bring home after all ...
— Ruth Arnold - or, the Country Cousin • Lucy Byerley

... generations. The skins of the outer tent are stretched over wooden ribs, which are carefully bound together by thongs of skin. The ribs rest partly on posts, partly on tripods of driftwood. The posts are driven into the ground, and the tripods get the necessary steadiness by a heavy stone or a seal-skin sack filled with sand being suspended from the middle of them. In order further to steady the tent a yet heavier stone is in the same way suspended by a strap from the top of the ...
— The Voyage of the Vega round Asia and Europe, Volume I and Volume II • A.E. Nordenskieold

... Sir Lionel—"every thing! First, we must get Miss Dalton out of that rascal's clutches; then we, must hand that fellow and his confederates over to the law. And if it don't end in Botany Bay and hard labor for life, then there's no law in the land. Why, who is he? A pettifogger—a ...
— The Living Link • James De Mille

... hadn't been gone an hour before a wire came in from Jim Carpenter. He says, 'Send Bond to me at once by fastest conveyance. Chance for a scoop on the biggest story of the century.' I don't know what it's about, but Jim Carpenter is always front page news. Get in touch with him at once and stay with him until you have the story. Don't risk trying to telegraph it when you get it—telephone. ...
— Astounding Stories of Super-Science September 1930 • Various

... negative blessing. It implies that where unfortunately people cannot be continent that marriage gives the best way out—enables them to get relief within the pale of virtue. This attitude affords to sex love no positive purport or merit of its own, and is in striking conflict with the facts of life through the ages—facts which ...
— Love—Marriage—Birth Control - Being a Speech delivered at the Church Congress at - Birmingham, October, 1921 • Bertrand Dawson

... Brown; "so you're going to leave us too, eh! Well, as some writing chap says somewhere or t'other in some book I've read, we could have better spared a better boy than you, Paddy. You've been a good lad too, in spite of your larks; and I hope you'll get on well in the service, like your chum Tom Bowling here. Stick to him, and he'll keep ...
— Young Tom Bowling - The Boys of the British Navy • J.C. Hutcheson

... turned over all the libraries, but still could not pull out a Saxo, even covered with beetles, bookworms, mould, and dust. So stubbornly had all the owners locked it away." A worthy prior, in compassion offered to get a copy and transcribe it with his own hand, but Christian, in respect for the prior's rank, absurdly declined. At last Birger, the Archbishop of Lund, by some strategy, got a copy, which King Christian the Second allowed to be taken to Paris on ...
— The Danish History, Books I-IX • Saxo Grammaticus ("Saxo the Learned")

... towns, by cities, by churches and by private welfare agencies. It is my thought that in the future they must be cared for as they were before. I stand ready through my own personal efforts, and through the public influence of the office that I hold, to help these local agencies to get the means necessary to assume ...
— Complete State of the Union Addresses from 1790 to the Present • Various

... Rouletabille's obvious impatience with her for doing it, Matrena went up to the general. She returned saying, "He is quiet. He doesn't sleep. He doesn't wish anything. He has asked me to prepare his narcotic. It is too bad. He has tried in vain, he cannot get along without it." ...
— The Secret of the Night • Gaston Leroux

... to introduce an artificial spring into the very waist and middle of autumn, and then to get the tulip-bulbs to take September for May, and set ...
— Halil the Pedlar - A Tale of Old Stambul • Mr Jkai

... by a chorus that danced around the altar. A goat was either the principal sacrifice on these occasions, or the participants, disguised as Satyrs, had a goat-like appearance; and from the two Greek words representing "goat" and "song" we get our word tragedy, [Footnote: From the Greek tragos, "a goat," and o'de, "a song."] or goat-song. At some of the more rustic festivals in honor of the same god the performance was of a more jocose or satirical character; and hence arose the term comedy, [Footnote: From the Greek ko'me, "a village," ...
— Mosaics of Grecian History • Marcius Willson and Robert Pierpont Willson

... to doubt What all this conjuring was about; For, every day, more deep in debt They saw their wealthy rulers get:— "Let's look (said they) the items thro' "And see if what we're told be true "Of our Periwinkle Revenue," But, lord! they found there wasn't a tittle Of truth in aught they heard before; For they gained by Periwinkles little And lost by Locusts ten times more! These Locusts are ...
— The Complete Poems of Sir Thomas Moore • Thomas Moore et al

... major, and that scoundrel Mahng deserved all he got. But ef he's as dead as he looks, I'm fearful that kick may get you into trouble with the tribe, though he's not a Seneca by blood, nor overly ...
— At War with Pontiac - The Totem of the Bear • Kirk Munroe and J. Finnemore

... of injury from the handling of wild carrot. We have always suspected the proximity of poison ivy; still, it is unwise to dogmatize on such matters. Some people cannot eat strawberries—more's the pity!—while the rest of us get along with them very happily. Lately the Primula obconica has acquired an evil reputation as an irritant, so there is no telling what may not ...
— Scientific American Supplement, No. 829, November 21, 1891 • Various

... was a fishing village, only three miles across country from Monnickendam, but the route, by steam tram and canal, was so circuitous, that, with luggage, it took one two hours to get from place to place. He had walked over there with Valentia, and it had almost tempted them to desert Monnickendam. Ferdinand took a room at the hotel and walked out, trying to distract himself. The village consisted of a couple of score of ...
— Orientations • William Somerset Maugham

... room. They frequently bathe the whole body, their smell would otherwise be offensive; they use towels brought from India. At dinner they spread their mats and sit as in Barbary. They smoke a great deal, but tobacco is dear; it is the best article of trade. Poisoning is common; they get the poison from the fangs of snakes, but, he says, most commonly from a part of the body near the tail, by a kind of distillation. Physic, taken immediately after the poison, may cure, but not always; if deferred two or three days, the man must die: the poison is slow, wastes the flesh, and produces ...
— An Account of Timbuctoo and Housa Territories in the Interior of Africa • Abd Salam Shabeeny

... conditions of town life afford greater security to the criminal; social and industrial causes create a large degenerate class not easily amenable to social control, incapable of getting regular work to do, or of doing it if they could get it. ...
— The Evolution of Modern Capitalism - A Study of Machine Production • John Atkinson Hobson

... gold metal we get is from Africa, which is 221/2 to 23 carats fine. In Virginia we have mines where the quality of the gold is much inferior—some of it as low as 19 carats, and in Georgia the mines produce ...
— The Exploring Expedition to the Rocky Mountains, Oregon and California • Brevet Col. J.C. Fremont

... continued in the room, and six degrees must be subtracted from that here given, to get the heat of the external air in the morning. Throughout the month, except in the foggy mornings, the atmosphere was clear, with ...
— An Account of The Kingdom of Nepal • Fancis Buchanan Hamilton

... who had breezed him out of the reading room of the Yale Club, was one of the party. He was in the first flush of speed-breaking and knew the town and its midnight haunts. He had offered to show Martin the way to get rid of depression. Right! He should be put to the test. Two could play the "Who cares?" game; and Martin, cut to the quick, angry and resisted, would enter his name. Not again would he put himself in the way of being laughed at and ridiculed ...
— Who Cares? • Cosmo Hamilton

... who lived in Ipswich was Lord Chedworth. He wore top-boots, and wore them till they were not fit to be seen. When new boots were sent home he was accustomed to set them on one side, and get his manservant to wear them a short time to prepare them for his own feet. Sometimes the man would tell his lordship that he thought the boots were ready, but his lordship would generally reply, 'Never mind, William; wear them another ...
— East Anglia - Personal Recollections and Historical Associations • J. Ewing Ritchie

... to get at Rallywood this evening. Yet let us see how he shoots before we conclude that he has any rooted objection to handling a pistol. I agree with Captain Colendorp, that the affair should be brought off to-night. I will go and find ...
— A Modern Mercenary • Kate Prichard and Hesketh Vernon Hesketh-Prichard

... condemns The Tunnel underneath Old Thames, And swears, his science all forgetting, Friend Brunel's judgment wanted whetting; 'Tis thus great characters are dish'd, When they get wetter than was wish'd,— Brunel to Gravesend meant to go Under the water, wags say so, And under that same water put His hopes to find a shorter cut; But when we leave the light of day. Water hath many a devious way, Which, like a naughty ...
— Poems (1828) • Thomas Gent

... Zigzag and even Whirlwind showed the effects of their long confinement, but all appeared to share the enthusiasm of their owners and worked royally to get forward. When they had traveled the distance named, the rest given them by their masters ...
— Deerfoot in The Mountains • Edward S. Ellis

... answer. "When the Dinne came upon us, the Koshare rushed out after bows and arrows; but the Moshome met them before they could reach the houses, and killed many before they could get into the cave." ...
— The Delight Makers • Adolf Bandelier

... fearing another tangle, the end was cut and buoyed, and we returned to grapple for the three-wire cable. All this is very tiresome for me. The buoying and dredging are managed entirely by W——, who has had much experience in this sort of thing; so I have not enough to do, and get very homesick. At noon the wind freshened and the sea rose so high that we had to run for land, and are once more this ...
— The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson, Volume 9 • Robert Louis Stevenson

... now saw that his plan of filing his army round the angle of the river and across the enemy's front would, in any case, be very costly, and was perhaps impossible. He, therefore, determined to get back to the Hlangwani plateau, and try the extreme left of the enemy's position. He had the strategic advantage of being on interior lines, and was consequently able to move his troops with great ease from one flank to the other. His new plan was to pass the brigades ...
— London to Ladysmith via Pretoria • Winston Spencer Churchill

... get away to sea.... David Cairns, overtaken in China, had changed a little. It appears that the very best of young men must change when they begin to wear their reputation. Riding with Thirteen had made easily the best newspaper fodder which ...
— Fate Knocks at the Door - A Novel • Will Levington Comfort

... some money upon a beautiful watch of mamma's. It was a very valuable one, but the man would only advance me three dollars upon it. Of course I felt that I must redeem it with the very first money I earned, and I went immediately to the pawnbroker's to get it on leaving your office. He seemed averse to the early redemption of the watch, and threw my money impatiently into the drawer. The next instant he gave it back to me, angrily telling me that it was counterfeit, and charging ...
— The Masked Bridal • Mrs. Georgie Sheldon

... add, not a word to these confidences; not even to assure me definitely that my father is still alive. He says that he has sworn an oath of secrecy. I called on him before I left New York. No, no; I may discover my father or he may discover me, or not, but we can rest absolutely assured that I shall get ...
— Queed • Henry Sydnor Harrison

... mountaineers of Tennessee and Kentucky are largely the descendants of these same Ulster Scots, and their origin is conclusively shown by the phrase used by mothers to their unruly children: "If you don't behave, Clavers [i.e., Claverhouse] will get you." ...
— Scotland's Mark on America • George Fraser Black

... at the same time he determined without delay to make a new effort to get the fatal evidence of his former crime into his ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Volume 3, Issue 17, March, 1859 • Various

... is, how welcome is his face within the gate, how free he makes with our wine, generally abusing it, how he tells our eldest daughter to light his candle for him, how he gave silver cups when the girls were born, and now bestows tea-services as they get married,—a most useful, safe, and charming fellow, not a year younger-looking or more nimble than ourselves, without whom life would be very blank. We all know that man; but such a man was not Colonel Osborne in the house ...
— He Knew He Was Right • Anthony Trollope

... dislike of Dr. Johnson; and a much higher opinion of Burke as an orator and politician, than of Fox or Pitt. He however thought him very inferior in richness of style and imagery to some of our elder prose-writers, particularly Jeremy Taylor. He liked Richardson, but not Fielding; nor could I get him to enter into the merits of Caleb Williams.[145] In short, he was profound and discriminating with respect to those authors whom he liked, and where he gave his judgment fair play; capricious, perverse, and prejudiced in his antipathies and distastes. ...
— Hazlitt on English Literature - An Introduction to the Appreciation of Literature • Jacob Zeitlin

... want to get warm," she answered, when they spoke of it. "It seems to me that it's very cold here. Don't ...
— John and Betty's History Visit • Margaret Williamson

... that had been dropped by slain or wounded Lipans, and they were well pleased to get them, as rifles were about to become the most valuable of all articles in Texas. They also recovered Ned and Obed's horses, which the Indians had left in the valley, evidently expecting to take them away, when they secured the scalps of the ...
— The Texan Star - The Story of a Great Fight for Liberty • Joseph A. Altsheler



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