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Face   /feɪs/   Listen
Face

noun
1.
The front of the human head from the forehead to the chin and ear to ear.  Synonym: human face.  "I wish I had seen the look on his face when he got the news"
2.
The feelings expressed on a person's face.  Synonyms: aspect, expression, facial expression, look.  "A look of triumph" , "An angry face"
3.
The general outward appearance of something.
4.
The striking or working surface of an implement.
5.
A part of a person that is used to refer to a person.  "When he returned to work he met many new faces"
6.
A surface forming part of the outside of an object.  Synonym: side.  "Dew dripped from the face of the leaf"
7.
The part of an animal corresponding to the human face.
8.
The side upon which the use of a thing depends (usually the most prominent surface of an object).
9.
A contorted facial expression.  Synonym: grimace.
10.
A specific size and style of type within a type family.  Synonyms: case, font, fount, typeface.
11.
Status in the eyes of others.
12.
Impudent aggressiveness.  Synonyms: boldness, brass, cheek, nerve.  "He had the effrontery to question my honesty"
13.
A vertical surface of a building or cliff.



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"Face" Quotes from Famous Books



... me awful that none of us should want his Matins. I should like, personally, to see him through with them. I could face the hostile eyes. But what I cannot face is the ceremony itself. My moral was spoiled with too many ceremonies in my youth; ceremonies that lacked all beauty and sincerity and dignity. And though I am convinced of the beauty and sincerity and dignity of Mr. Grierson's soul ...
— A Journal of Impressions in Belgium • May Sinclair

... the face of an undefeated enemy fleet, this move has been justly condemned by naval strategists. But with a less alert opponent the coup might have succeeded. Tegetthoff, the Austrian commander, was not yet 41 years of age, but had been in active naval ...
— A History of Sea Power • William Oliver Stevens and Allan Westcott

... for myself," the girl went on; "there's plenty of shops where I can get an engagement, but of course it won't be the same as here, which has been home for me ever since I was a child. There! the things that men will do! I've told him plain to his face that he ought to be ashamed of himself, and so has aunt. And he is ashamed, what's more. Don't you call it disgusting, such a marriage ...
— Eve's Ransom • George Gissing

... a Scotch Highlander wears his plaid, and was painted so as to make the most hideous appearance I ever beheld: Round one eye was a large circle of white, a circle of black surrounded the other, and the rest of his face was streaked with paint of different colours: I did not measure him, but if I may judge of his height by the proportion of his stature to my own, it could not be much less than seven feet. When this frightful Colossus ...
— A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Vol. 12 • Robert Kerr

... across Quien Sabe, his face, the face of an ascetic, lean, brown, infinitely sad, set toward the Mission church. In about an hour he reached and crossed the road that led northward from Guadalajara toward the Seed ranch, and, a little farther on, forded Broderson Creek where it ran through one corner of the Mission ...
— The Octopus • Frank Norris

... guide and where obey. And, lo! some rumour of this peace, being gone Forth to the Greek, hath cursed me. Achilles' son, So soon as I was taken, for his thrall Chose me. I shall do service in the hall Of them that slew.... How? Shall I thrust aside Hector's beloved face, and open wide My heart to this new lord? Oh, I should stand A traitor to the dead! And if my hand And flesh shrink from him ... lo, wrath and despite O'er all the house, and I ...
— The Trojan women of Euripides • Euripides

... smile at this, Lord Angelo?— O heaven! the vanity of wretched fools! Give us some seats.—Come, cousin Angelo; In this I'll be impartial; be you judge Of your own cause.—Is this the witness, friar? First let her show her face, and after speak. ...
— Measure for Measure • William Shakespeare [Collins edition]

... of alders, around which we had to circle. The doctor stopped to show me some tracks of otters, and then we came to a place where the bank was steep, and a little smooth path was worn down upon its face, leading ...
— Sweetapple Cove • George van Schaick

... Japan. Here is a specimen: "In America during the Civil War paper currency was issued and made legal tender. At every successive issue the premium rose higher and higher till the currency was not worth more than a third of its face. The Southern States followed in the same path, but they kept on till their issues were found to be good for about one purpose only—to line trunks withal—such fools these Americans be. Happy Japan! blessed with rulers of preeminent ability, who keep ...
— Round the World • Andrew Carnegie

... you expect me to blight my budding career by a poisonous pun like that?" demanded Average Jones with a wry face. ...
— Average Jones • Samuel Hopkins Adams

... and Grannie had her way. Alison and David both kissed her, and went out into the world to face their new duties. They were not coming back any more to the little home. Grannie ...
— Good Luck • L. T. Meade

... say?" said Laura, as a blush mounted up to her cheek, and of which Pen saw the fervour, though Laura's veil fell over her face to hide it. ...
— The History of Pendennis • William Makepeace Thackeray

... scene. Why, then, this great hue and cry about it now? The entire uproar sprang solely from the fear of Mr. Stener at this juncture, the fear of the politicians at this juncture, of public exposure. No city treasurer had ever been exposed before. It was a new thing to face exposure, to face the risk of having the public's attention called to a rather nefarious practice of which Mr. Stener was taking advantage, that was all. A great fire and a panic were endangering the security and well-being of many a financial organization in the city—Mr. Cowperwood's ...
— The Financier • Theodore Dreiser

... love was so sincere and ardent, on both sides, that it made losses and sufferings appear as nothing. When I, in a sort of half-whisper, asked Mrs. DICKENS where her piano was, she smiled, and turned her face towards her baby, that was sitting on her knee; as much as to say, 'This little fellow has beaten the piano;' and, if what I am now writing should ever have the honour to be read by her, let it be the bearer of a renewed ...
— Advice to Young Men • William Cobbett

... the walk was paved, I drew near the half-open gateway upon Worship Street. The postman was descending the steps of the post-office opposite. He saw me through the gate and paused. He knew me, too! My face, easily marked out amid the resident faces he was familiar with, had at once caught his attention; very likely he, too, had by now learned that I was interested in the battle of Cowpens; but I did not ask him this. He crossed over and handed me ...
— Lady Baltimore • Owen Wister

... words the blood flew to Euergetes' face; but he suppressed the keen and insulting reply that rose to his lips, and this little victory over his wrathful impulse was made the more easy as Lysias, at this moment, rejoined the feasters; he excused himself ...
— Uarda • Georg Ebers

... chastity, discovered, through reading some pamphlet against solitary vice, that she had herself been practicing masturbation for years without knowing it. The profound anguish and hopeless despair of this woman in face of what she believed to be the moral ruin of her whole life cannot well be described. It would be easy to give further examples, though scarcely a more striking one, to show the utter confusion into which we are thrown by leaving this matter in the hands of blind leaders ...
— Studies in the Psychology of Sex, Volume 1 (of 6) • Havelock Ellis

... face of it this cable seems to suggest that a man widely known as a straight and capable soldier should be given the shortest of shrifts at the instance of "unofficial reports"; i.e., camp gossip. Surely the cable message carries with ...
— Gallipoli Diary, Volume 2 • Ian Hamilton

... his sister was resorting to sarcasm or frivolity. But one look at her unsmiling face and ...
— The Man Thou Gavest • Harriet T. Comstock

... Good and Evil, and recognise that all Good is bound up for us with cleaving to God, and all Evil with departing from Him. When we turn our backs on Him we are full front with the deformed figure of Evil; when we turn away from it, we are face to face with Him, and in Him, with ...
— Expositions of Holy Scripture - Isaiah and Jeremiah • Alexander Maclaren

... I see," he growled. "Grabbing everything you can get hold of. But a joke is a joke—let this one rest right here! Thornton, I say it here to your face, where all the boys can hear me: the people want a change in this State. I am not going behind a door to talk with you—that's been done too much! I stand in the open and say it! Open fighting after this—that's my code. I fight for the people. The people shall be put wise and kept ...
— The Ramrodders - A Novel • Holman Day

... hour do show; 100 So from our Maker wandering, we stray, Like birds that know not to their nests the way. In Him we dwelt before our exile here, And may, returning, find contentment there: True joy may find, perfection of delight, Behold his face, and shun eternal night. ...
— Poetical Works of Edmund Waller and Sir John Denham • Edmund Waller; John Denham

... my life! By eye, by face, by tongue it should be shee: Oh I, it was my love; Ile after her, And though she passe the eagle in her flight Ile never rest till I have gain'd her ...
— Old English Plays, Vol. I - A Collection of Old English Plays • Various

... the sunset; on the slowly fading colours of the cloudlands overhead. Something of that colour played across her fine face, mellowing, softening, drawing as it seemed the very soul to cheeks and lips and eyes. Dave paused in his speech to regard her, and her beauty rushed upon him, engulfed him, overwhelmed him in such a poignancy of tenderness that it seemed for a moment all his ...
— The Cow Puncher • Robert J. C. Stead

... steps? Yet was it not more probable that he desired my absence by thus encouraging the supposition that the house was unoccupied? I would see this man in spite of all impediments; ere I died, I would see his face, and summon him to penitence and retribution; no matter at what cost an interview was purchased. Reputation and life might be wrested from me by another, but my rectitude and honor were in my own keeping, and ...
— Wieland; or The Transformation - An American Tale • Charles Brockden Brown

... entered the supper-room she removed her little visor, and she felt, rather than saw, the mask put up his hand and lift away his own: he turned his head, and looked down upon her with the face of a man she ...
— A Fearful Responsibility and Other Stories • William D. Howells

... stepped within the chamber, he lost the complete effect of all this; for the sage's back, not his face, ...
— Israel Potter • Herman Melville

... affection by way of episode 20, 21 A short list of the methods now in use to avoid a whipping—which nevertheless follows 22 The force of example 23 A sketch of the particular symptoms of obstinacy as they discover themselves in a child, with a simile illustrating a blubbered face 24, 25, 26 A hint of great importance 27 The piety of the poet in relation to that school-dame's memory, who had the first formation of a CERTAIN patriot. [This stanza has been left out in the later editions; it refers to the Duke of Argyle.] The secret connexion between WHIPPING and ...
— Curiosities of Literature, Vol. II (of 3) - Edited, With Memoir And Notes, By His Son, The Earl Of Beaconsfield • Isaac D'Israeli

... the court, from the cradle to the grave, the French invariably dance when they can seize an opportunity. Nay, the older the individual, the more vigorous seems to be the passion. Wrinkles may furrow the face, but lassitude never ...
— Travels in France during the years 1814-1815 • Archibald Alison

... to carry on the work of their liberal fathers that led John G. Fee and his colaborers to establish Berea College in Kentucky. In the charter of this institution was incorporated the declaration that "God has made of one blood all nations that dwell upon the face of the earth." No Negroes were admitted to this institution before the Civil War, but they came in soon thereafter, some being accepted while returning home wearing their uniforms.[1] The State has since prohibited the co-education of the ...
— The Education Of The Negro Prior To 1861 • Carter Godwin Woodson

... all, it were of but little more consequence than any other sigh. But this is only the beginning. It is the lighting of the spark that shall blaze a glorious star, or burn a lurid conflagration for ever." He stopped; he raised his eyes to the face of Faith, whose own were fastened on him, and gazed fondly on her; his features assumed a softened expression; and, as if a new train of thought had driven out the old, he added, "blessed are the pure in heart, for they shall ...
— The Lost Hunter - A Tale of Early Times • John Turvill Adams

... in troubled tones. "And yet, perhaps, it is possible. Veronica would not be so cruel as to ruin them—the money is nothing to her. And, after all, she will hardly feel the loss out of her immense fortune. Yes—" his face brightened slowly with the rays of hope. "Yes—it may be possible, after all. I had thought of going to her, but not of telling her the whole truth. It did not seem as though I could, until I had heard myself tell ...
— Taquisara • F. Marion Crawford

... dashing down from the mountain with an awful roar. They could tell when it had reached the foot of the slope; they could tell when it swept the skirt of the forest; and when it was directly above them. It was like the rolling of thunder across the face of the earth; it was as if the whole mountain had come tumbling into the valley. When it seemed to be almost upon them, every head went down. "It will crush us," they all thought. "It will ...
— Jerusalem • Selma Lagerlof

... conducted up by Betty; but what, reader, was the surprize on both sides, when he saw Joseph was the person in bed, and when Joseph discovered the face of his good friend Mr ...
— Joseph Andrews Vol. 1 • Henry Fielding

... turn things have taken!" groaned the tutor, wiping his moist face. "Poor boy! poor boy! I ought to have seen him again. It was more than the ...
— The Queen's Scarlet - The Adventures and Misadventures of Sir Richard Frayne • George Manville Fenn

... between the successive hammer-strokes are controlled in the following way: on the inner face of the group of pulleys mounted on the main shaft of the mechanism (this gang of pulleys appears at the extreme right in the illustration) is made fast a protractor scaled in half degrees. Upon the frame of the standard supporting ...
— Harvard Psychological Studies, Volume 1 • Various

... called. Felicity's eyes opened. They looked calm and dewy, like a child's. She raised her head—the robin called again. Felicity looked about her, at the flowers in her hand, the trees, the sky. Her face broke into smiles, she rose tall, taller, feet on tiptoe, hands reaching skyward. It was the waking of spring. Then she ...
— The Nest Builder • Beatrice Forbes-Robertson Hale

... Shortly after the death of the little boy Mrs. Stokes succumbed. Margaret and Miss King eventually got away on the raft, and were picked up by the steamer Korona. Mate Scott also escaped. Miss King did not sustain serious injuries. She covered the face of Margaret with her dress, but still the child was probably ...
— The San Francisco Calamity • Various

... had talents fit to win Success in life's career; And if I chose a part of sin, My choice has cost me dear. But those who brand me with disgrace, Will scarcely dare to say They spoke the taunt before my face And went unscathed away.' ...
— Australian Writers • Desmond Byrne

... opened window looking down into the street when Mr. Woodcourt spoke to me. I learned in a moment that he loved me. I learned in a moment that my scarred face was all unchanged to him. I learned in a moment that what I had thought was pity and compassion was devoted, generous, faithful love. Oh, too late to know it now, too late, too late. That was the first ungrateful ...
— Bleak House • Charles Dickens

... High School. He completed a four years' classical course in two years, two terms, and two months. He graduated at the head of a class of twenty-three. He entered the law office of Judge Jesse P. Bishop, and in 1870 graduated from the Cleveland Law School. He turned his face Southward, and having settled in South Carolina, began the practice of law, which was attended with great success. But the climate was not agreeable to his health, and in 1872 he returned to the scenes of his early toils and struggles. He became a practising attorney in Cleveland, and ...
— History of the Negro Race in America from 1619 to 1880. Vol. 2 (of 2) - Negroes as Slaves, as Soldiers, and as Citizens • George Washington Williams

... which were crawling in and out of the cosmos blossoms in the garden. Interesting as the bees were, however, they could not keep her thoughts from turning to the Winnebagos afloat on the river, and it was a very doleful face that bent over the flowers. Her dismal reflections were interrupted by the sharp voice of Aunt Phoebe calling her to come in. "What is it?" she asked listlessly, as she ...
— The Camp Fire Girls at School • Hildegard G. Frey

... girl, restored by the voice of the Indian to a consciousness of her position, covered her face with her trembling ...
— The Pearl of Lima - A Story of True Love • Jules Verne

... characteristic of a manorial appurtenance. The church, which partakes of the same trimness, is Perp. The tower is of rather an unusual type, being low and squat, and unrelieved by battlements. The staircase is only a flat projection on the S. side, carried half way up. Upon the N. face of the tower is a Tudor rose (cp. Marston Magna). Note (1) stoups in S. porch and outside N. door; (2) Jacobean stalls; (3) piscina and aumbry; (4) niche in E. wall of N. aisle; (5) richly carved square font. The nave retains its original 15th cent. ...
— Somerset • G.W. Wade and J.H. Wade

... by the whole or a part of the current which is to be measured. Since this current varies, the power exciting the core of the electro magnet must also vary; and since we require the core to have as nearly as possible a permanent magnetic force, we are brought face to face with the question, whether an electro magnet can be constructed that has a constant moment under varying exciting currents. This question has been answered by the well known experiments of Jacobi, Dub, Mueller, Weber, ...
— Scientific American Supplement, No. 433, April 19, 1884 • Various

... him as he stood above her bed. Slowly she reached out and placed one slim hand in his. "I know what you are thinking," she said, "and—" her face twisted in a grimace of pain, and the hand in his clutched with convulsive strength at ...
— The Lani People • J. F. Bone

... remember," observes Roger North, when he is showing the perfect control in which his brother Francis kept his temper, at his table a stupid servant spilt a glass of red wine upon his point band and clothes. "He only wiped his face and clothes with the napkin, and 'Here,' said he, 'take ...
— A Book About Lawyers • John Cordy Jeaffreson

... and French; and these betokened an extent of reading, that he who wishes for a companion to his mind in the sweet commune of woman, which softens and refines all it gives and takes in interchange, will never condemn as masculine. You had but to look into Violante's face to see how noble was the intelligence that brought soul to those lovely features. Nothing hard, nothing dry and stern was there. Even as you detected knowledge, it was lost in the gentleness of grace. ...
— My Novel, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... shook his head and looked so utterly miserable that a smile came across Mr Crawley's face. After all, others besides himself had their troubles and trials. Mrs Proudie saw and understood the smile, and became more angry than ever. She drew her chair close to the table, and began to fidget with her ...
— The Last Chronicle of Barset • Anthony Trollope

... to investigate. Accordingly at an hour when he knew Terence should be in the engine room he took up the speaking-tube at the head of his bed and blew into it. But no shrill whistle signalled his desire in the engine room, and though Michael blew until he was red in the face and his lips hurt him cruelly, reluctantly he came to the conclusion that Herr August Carl von Staden had the situation very well in hand and Terence Reardon in the latter's ...
— Cappy Ricks Retires • Peter B. Kyne

... debauchee stared at him uncomprehendingly for a few moments. Then understanding dawned, and his bloated face creased into ...
— The Elephant God • Gordon Casserly

... avenge," answered the old man fiercely; a fiery flush crimsoning his sallow face, and his eye beaming lurid rage. "Wrongs, to repay which all the blood that flows in patrician veins were ...
— The Roman Traitor (Vol. 1 of 2) • Henry William Herbert

... Peshawar: forty to fifty thousand French troops would be needed, and thirty or forty thousand Persians should also be taken up. Nothing came of these plans; but it is clear that, even when Napoleon was face to face with formidable foes on the Vistula, his thoughts still turned longingly to the banks ...
— The Life of Napoleon I (Volumes, 1 and 2) • John Holland Rose

... Harry went to the Residency. He had again painted caste marks on his face, which completely changed his appearance. Telling the guard that he had come from Bombay, and had a message for Colonel Palmer, he was ...
— At the Point of the Bayonet - A Tale of the Mahratta War • G. A. Henty

... three times, appearing slightly bored. Greg did not glance in the direction of his coming antagonist, but Holmes's face was impassive, inscrutable. He did not appear nervous. The moment had come, and Greg faced the situation dumbly but ...
— Dick Prescott's First Year at West Point • H. Irving Hancock

... country that hath yet her maidenhead, never sacked, turned, nor wrought; the face of the earth hath not been torn, nor the virtue and salt of the soil spent by manurance. The graves have not been opened for gold, the mines not broken with sledges, nor their images pulled down out of their temples. It hath never been ...
— The Discovery of Guiana • Sir Walter Raleigh

... upstairs, and began to deliver a message from Lady Conway, that she was going to write in a day or two to beg for a visit from Isabel during her sojourn at Estminster, a watering-place about thirty miles distant. Isabel's face lighted with pleasure. 'I could go?' she said, eagerly turning ...
— Dynevor Terrace (Vol. II) • Charlotte M. Yonge

... close to the pane of the window that the nose was flattened grotesquely, eyes wildly staring, hair disheveled, was a face that even in that tense moment the girls recognized—the face ...
— The Outdoor Girls at Wild Rose Lodge - or, The Hermit of Moonlight Falls • Laura Lee Hope

... was dressing on the following morning, Thorndyke entered my room. His face was grave even to sternness, and he held a telegram ...
— John Thorndyke's Cases • R. Austin Freeman

... That brute has wedged them in and jumped upon them. Why, we may push and heave till we're black in the face and do no good. We're ...
— The Lost Middy - Being the Secret of the Smugglers' Gap • George Manville Fenn

... mind out loud, and they begun to talk earnest and excited about 'em, and I could see as they went on that they felt jest alike towards the Injuns, and wanted 'em wiped off'en the face of the earth; but they disagreed some as to the ways they wanted 'em wiped. One of 'em wanted 'em shot right down to once, and exterminated jest as ...
— Samantha at the World's Fair • Marietta Holley

... at George's. He does not need to be told of the shouts which greeted the appearance of boy after boy from Railsford's house on the platform steps to receive his prize; or of the grim smile on the doctor's face as a youthful voice from the prize benches, forgetting the solemnity of the occasion, shouted, "Marky again, bravo us!" Nor when presently Arthur Herapath was called up to receive a piece of paper informing him that he was the winner of half the Swift Exhibition, ...
— The Master of the Shell • Talbot Baines Reed

... German soldiers took hold of a young civilian named D. and bound his hands behind his back, and struck him in the face with their fists. They then tied his hands in front and fastened the cord to the tail of the horse. The horse dragged him for about fifty yards, and then the Germans loosened his hands and left him. The whole of his face was cut and ...
— New York Times Current History; The European War, Vol 2, No. 3, June, 1915 - April-September, 1915 • Various

... to keep off the boys who occasionally trespassed on it. Attempting to repeat the trespass in presence of the slave, they were told that his 'master forbad it.' At this the boys were enraged, and hurled brickbats at the slave until his face and other parts were much injured and wounded—but nothing was said or done about it as an injury ...
— The Anti-Slavery Examiner, Omnibus • American Anti-Slavery Society

... send you on this business, Patsy. You have never in your life gone out to face quite as much peril as you will find in this expedition ...
— A Woman at Bay - A Fiend in Skirts • Nicholas Carter

... Sultan hears of this damsel is that the Master of the Eunuchs cannot in the least manage her; for she merely laughs at all he says. The Sultan, out of curiosity, orders her to be brought to him, and she immediately cries: "Thank Heaven! here is a face like a man's. Of course you are the sublime Sultan whose slave I have the honour to be? Please cashier this disgusting old rascal." To which extremely irreverent address Soliman makes a dignified reply of the proper kind, including due reference to "obedience" ...
— A History of the French Novel, Vol. 1 - From the Beginning to 1800 • George Saintsbury

... which untrue statements have been accepted at their face value has surprised and deeply disturbed me. I have conversed with three college presidents, each of whom believed that the current expenses of the Philippine government were paid from ...
— The Philippines: Past and Present (vol. 1 of 2) • Dean C. Worcester

... the fiend, Pink would the devil see; And so he may, if he'll be rul'd by me; Let but Pink's face i' th' looking-glass be shown, And Pink may paint the devil's by ...
— The Hesperides & Noble Numbers: Vol. 1 and 2 • Robert Herrick

... action. He thought she meant to explain. She kept hold of his hand, and tears were in her lovely eyes as she looked up into his dark face, now little more than a shadow in the faint light that came from ...
— The Watchers of the Plains - A Tale of the Western Prairies • Ridgewell Cullum

... walls will be ready first, and those in the beds will follow. Spaces between the trees of a fruit wall may be planted with Potatoes, without injury to the trees. Those grown on the south face of a good wall will be ready for table three weeks in advance of the earliest crops in the open quarters. But east and west walls may be made to contribute, and even north walls are useful, if planted a week later and a little deeper. In all cases the sets should be put close to the wall ...
— The Culture of Vegetables and Flowers From Seeds and Roots, 16th Edition • Sutton and Sons

... soused through the waters of the grim North Sea, his keen eyes ever on the alert fore and aft, and occasionally on the sister ship to his, coupled along with the "broom." They were "carrying on," as usual. This skipper was a man just in his thirties. His face was cheery and round, and body was muscular and thick-set. In spite of the watch he and his first mate kept on this particular occasion, he found time to give me his opinion on certain things interesting to the men who go ...
— Some Naval Yarns • Mordaunt Hall

... S. Pancrazio, 2786 ft., 4 m. from Albertacce is the commencement of the Scala di Santa Regina, as this part of road is called, cut in the face of perpendicular cliffs rising from the bed of the Golo. About half way are the small chapel and inn of Santa Regina, and the cave which in former times used to be ...
— Itinerary through Corsica - by its Rail, Carriage & Forest Roads • Charles Bertram Black

... his boasted powers of observation, Captain Quinn failed to notice the disgust and alarm on Hyacinth's face. ...
— Hyacinth - 1906 • George A. Birmingham

... now go without these walls and boldly face our enemies, holding before you the crucifix. If Roderic be their leader, it may be that the sight of you will move him to a sense of the holiness of this place, and haply you may by your arguments ...
— The Thirsty Sword • Robert Leighton

... in a curious treatise, long since lost; which he inscribed [Greek: peri ton Aiguption apoikias]. We meet with a summary account of them in Diodorus Siculus, who mentions, that after the death of Isis and Osiris the Egyptians sent out many colonies, which were scattered over the face of the earth. [1266][Greek: Ho de oun Aiguptioi phasi kai meta tauta apoikias pleistas ex Aiguptou kata pasan diasparenai ten oikoumenen.] Of these migrations there were two remarkable above the rest: the one of the sons of Chus, concerning whom ...
— A New System; or, an Analysis of Antient Mythology. Volume II. (of VI.) • Jacob Bryant

... master with the bully's face, And with the coward heart, Who never fail'd, to his disgrace, To act a coward's part, Did join Dunbogue, the greatest rogue, In all the shire of Fife, Who was the first the cause to leave, By counsel ...
— Memoirs of the Jacobites of 1715 and 1745. - Volume I. • Mrs. Thomson

... seems where, in courtesy, The pale face with the forest prince could vie, For one presided, who, for tact and grace, In any age had held an honored place,— In Beauty's own dear day had ...
— At Home And Abroad - Or, Things And Thoughts In America and Europe • Margaret Fuller Ossoli

... proceedings. [6] They imprisoned and fined juries who hesitated to lend their aid when it was deemed convenient to seek it. To these, Lord Bacon tells us, were added "other courses fitter to be buried than repeated."[7] Emboldened by long success, they at last disdained to observe "the half face of justice,"[8] but summoning the wealthy and timid before them in private houses, "shuffled up" a summary examination without a jury, and levied such exactions as were measured only by the fears and fortunes of ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction, Vol. 17, - Issue 495, June 25, 1831 • Various

... am so glad—so glad! You will get well; you must! Listen! I know you now, and why you looked at me so. You think you saw me up at Revelstoke—I think I remember your face there—and you don't trust me. You are looking for that man—the man that took her away from you. You think I could find a trail to him; but you are wrong. He is dead, and I know she is—I know! Your name was the last word she said—'Joe.' She wanted you ...
— That Girl Montana • Marah Ellis Ryan

... earlier history of Oxford, and the record of many another University give us instances of mortal combats between the Nations. The scholars of Paris, in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries, had to face the mortal enmity of the monks of the Abbey of St Germain, the meadow in front of which was claimed by the Faculty of Arts. The sight of Paris students walking or playing on the Pre-aux-clercs had much the same ...
— Life in the Medieval University • Robert S. Rait

... sympathise with others who do so. But I can assure them that they will find such lofty studies do them good only in proportion as they have first learnt the art of learning. Unless they have learnt to face facts manfully, to discriminate between them skilfully, to draw conclusions from them rigidly; unless they have learnt in all things to look, not for what they would like to be true, but for what is true, because God has done it, and it cannot ...
— Scientific Essays and Lectures • Charles Kingsley

... bloated bloodhound might be by some black and vicious mongrel, he tramped heavily towards the church. Indeed they made a queer contrast, this small, active but fierce-faced man in his sombre, shiny garments and dingy white tie, and the huge, ample-paunched baronet with his red, flat face, heavy lips and projecting but intelligent eyes, clothed in a new suit, wearing an enormous black pearl in his necktie and a diamond ring on his finger; the very ideal of Mammon in every detail of his person and of his carefully ...
— Love Eternal • H. Rider Haggard

... foreign fruits and flowers that he had brought home from abroad, and had a greenhouse where you could often find the grandmother of the family, who was most generous in her gifts. There were people who thought you "flew in the face of Providence" when you made flowers bloom in winter, but Providence seemed to smile ...
— A Little Girl in Old Boston • Amanda Millie Douglas

... awful sea the boat was at length launched. Though every billow threatened to engulf the frail craft, yet it nevertheless rode through the mountainous waves and drew near the rock where the helpless men and women were standing face to face with death. When it was sufficiently close to the shore William Darling sprang out to help the weary perishing creatures, whilst Grace was left to ...
— Beneath the Banner • F. J. Cross

... to find your name in the city directory, Mr. Reed," explained the priest, his face beaming with happiness. "But at police headquarters I found that you had made inquiries, and that detectives were searching for the girl. I learned that you were living with your wife's sister, and that you had no business address, having just come up from South America. So I telephoned ...
— Carmen Ariza • Charles Francis Stocking

... Yankee, and a broad Dutch physiognomy alternate; flower-venders, dog-pedlers, diplomates, soldiers, dandies, and vagabonds, pass and disappear; a firemen's procession, fallen horse, dead-lock of vehicles, military halt, or menagerie caravan, checks momently the advancing throng; and some beautiful face or elegant costume looms out of the confused picture like an exquisite vision; great cubes of lake crystal glisten in the ice-carts hard by blocks of ebon coal from the forests of the primeval world; there a letter-carrier threads his way, and here a newsboy shouts his ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 18, No. 110, December, 1866 - A Magazine of Literature, Science, Art, and Politics • Various

... the spring of the year 1897 that Holmes's iron constitution showed some symptoms of giving way in the face of constant hard work of a most exacting kind, aggravated, perhaps, by occasional indiscretions of his own. In March of that year Dr. Moore Agar, of Harley Street, whose dramatic introduction to Holmes I may some day recount, gave positive ...
— The Adventure of the Devil's Foot • Arthur Conan Doyle

... little use to call him "a rascal, a scoundrel, a thief, an impostor, a blackguard, a villain, a raggamuffin, a—what you please;" all that he is used to—it is his mother-tongue, and probably his mother's. But look him steadily and quietly in the face, and say—"Upon my word, I think you are the ugliest fellow I ever saw in my life," and he will instantly roll forth the brazen thunders of the charioteer Salmoneus as follows:—"Hugly! what the h—ll are you? You a gentleman! ...
— Life of Lord Byron, Vol. 6 (of 6) - With his Letters and Journals • Thomas Moore

... incandescent light hither and thither, observing the surgeon with languid interest. Another nurse, much younger, without the "black band," watched the surgeon from the foot of the cot. Beads of perspiration chased themselves down her pale face, caused less by sympathy than by sheer weariness and heat. The small receiving room of St. Isidore's was close and stuffy, surcharged with odors of iodoform and ether. The Chicago spring, so long delayed, ...
— The Web of Life • Robert Herrick

... says of him: "In all the arts that make a great preacher or orator, Cardinal Newman was deficient. His manner was constrained and ungraceful, and even awkward; his voice was thin and weak, his bearing was not at first impressive in any way—a gaunt emaciated figure, a sharp eagle face, and a cold meditative eye, rather repelled than attracted those who saw him for the first time." I do not think Mr. McCarthy's phrases very happily chosen to convey his meaning. Surely a gaunt emaciated frame and a sharp ...
— The Oxford Movement - Twelve Years, 1833-1845 • R.W. Church

... She looked at him with maternal anxiety, quite upset. And, indeed, however proud and lofty his figure, his handsome regular face did seem to her paler than usual. It was as if the nobility of the facade had, in some degree, ceased to hide the irreparable dilapidation within. And given his real good nature, it must be true that he suffered—suffered by reason of his useless, wasted life, by reason of ...
— The Three Cities Trilogy, Complete - Lourdes, Rome and Paris • Emile Zola

... enthusiastic in self-devoted charity, all undefined, floating on his imagination in misty tints of glory! That all this should be suddenly brought down from cloudland, to sink into Mary Ponsonby, with the honest face and downright manner for whom romance and rapture would be ...
— Dynevor Terrace (Vol. I) - or, The Clue of Life • Charlotte M. Yonge

... I spoke the door was flung open, and honest Dick Wharton, with the water pouring from him, stepped in, his hearty red face looming through the haze like a harvest-moon. He shook himself, and after greeting us sat down by the ...
— Stories by English Authors: Africa • Various

... knew he hated me; and that I turned out my offspring to chance for his sake, like puppies in a pond to swim or drown according as Providence pleased; that for her part she must look herself out a place like the other servants, for my face would she never see more.' 'Nor write to me?' said I. 'I shall not, madam,' replied she with a cold sneer, 'easily find out your address; for you are going you know not whither, ...
— Autobiography, Letters and Literary Remains of Mrs. Piozzi (Thrale) (2nd ed.) (2 vols.) • Mrs. Hester Lynch Piozzi

... the sort; and the islands were constantly increasing or diminishing under their action. To prevent the last, a thicket of trees was left at the head of each island, to form a sort of barricade against the inroads of the ice in the spring. So low was the face of the land, or meadow, however, that a rise of a very few feet in the river would be certain to bring it entirely under water. All this will be made more apparent by our own proceedings, after we had placed the ladies in the sleigh; and more especially, ...
— Satanstoe • James Fenimore Cooper

... letter, and his reply would be hardly intelligible without it. Moreover, I am not at all sure that I can lay my hands upon your father's letter in a certain chaos of papers which I have never had the courage to face for years. But if ...
— The Life and Letters of Thomas Henry Huxley Volume 2 • Leonard Huxley

... came up." The professor's face is so gloomy, that Hardinge may be forgiven for saying to ...
— A Little Rebel • Mrs. Hungerford

... car drew up, the hall-door of "The Cedars" was thrown open by the butler, a fair-haired clean-shaven man of about forty-five, with grave, impassive face, and eyes that gave the impression of ...
— Malcolm Sage, Detective • Herbert George Jenkins

... path. School children amuse themselves by reflecting sunbeams from a mirror into their companions' faces. If the companion moves his head in order to avoid the reflected beam, his tormentor moves or inclines the mirror and flashes the beam back to his victim's face. ...
— General Science • Bertha M. Clark

... David my servant; with my holy oil have I anointed him: with whom my hand shall be established: mine arm also shall strengthen him. The enemy shall not exact upon him: nor the sin of wickedness afflict him. And I will beat down his foes before his face, and plague them that hate him. But my faithfulness and my mercy shall be with him: and in my name shall his horn be exalted. I will set his hand also in the sea, and his right hand In the rivers. He shall cry unto me thou art my father, my God, ...
— Five Pebbles from the Brook • George Bethune English

... leaving a drop of rain. At very rare intervals light rains fall in the desert regions north of Coquimbo, but these are brought by the prevailing coast winds. With this exception these regions are the most arid on the face of the globe, highly heated by a tropical sun during the day and chilled at night by the proximity of snow-covered heights and a cold ocean current. Going south the temperature slowly falls and the rainfall gradually increases, the year being divided into a short rainy season and a long, ...
— Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 6, Slice 2 - "Chicago, University of" to "Chiton" • Various

... condition. It has been shown in electric railroading that an accident to apparatus, perhaps of slight moment, may cause an unreasoning panic, on account of which passengers may wander on adjoining tracks in face of approaching trains. To provide as perfectly as practicable for such conditions, it has been arranged to loop the control of signals into an emergency box set in a conspicuous position in each station platform. The pushing ...
— The New York Subway - Its Construction and Equipment • Anonymous

... the tenants of the Court were good people, honest and pure, but there were exceptions. Of these my memory has retained the face of a man who was known as "Carrot Pudding" Moe, a red-headed, broad-shouldered "finger worker," a specialist in "short change," yardstick frauds, and other varieties of market-place legerdemain. One woman, a cross between ...
— The Rise of David Levinsky • Abraham Cahan

... not the purely literary life of Boston, nor so distinctive an intellectual character; it is not so stamped by the impress of olden times as Philadelphia; but it has an outside garb significant of the inward nature. It is like the face of a great actor, splendid in expression, full of character, changing with a thousand changing emotions, but betraying a great soul beneath them all. New York is artistic just as America is artistic, just as the age is artistic: not, perhaps, in the loftiest or most refined ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 5, No. 32, June, 1860 • Various

... voice to celebrate the "great day which the Lord hath made." And even as the heavy stone was suddenly flung aside from the sepulchre under the shadow of Golgotha, giving freedom to the Master of the world; so the pall of winter was torn from the face of nature, and from the hearts of men was removed the burden which, during four long months, had made their torpor somewhat akin to that of the great beasts ...
— The Bastonnais - Tale of the American Invasion of Canada in 1775-76 • John Lesperance

... she cried and cried, all convulsed with sobs, floored, shipwrecked, done for. She cried and cried, as though stupefied, saw nothing save through a thick veil of water, like a person drowning, sinking. It seemed to her as if the tears would groove her face, for always. Oh, what would she give to be at home, in bed! Never, never again would she have the strength to do a thing. She was done for, buried alive. And that coward of a Jimmy, to obey Harrasford's order! Oh, the harm he had done her! ...
— The Bill-Toppers • Andre Castaigne

... raised inquiringly to the speaker's face, but seeing that this was not meant sarcastically, he said drily,—"No; I shall arrange to be as far away from the sultan's elephant ...
— Middy and Ensign • G. Manville Fenn

... his face grave. "Perhaps if there had been no Kicker here my decision might have been different," he said. "But so long as it is here it is in ...
— The Coming of the Law • Charles Alden Seltzer

... vicious side blow at the merchant, and throwing himself upon the sergeant's horse, regardless of a bullet from the latter's revolver, he galloped away, and was speedily out of range. As to Williams, from the beginning of the skirmish he had lain face downwards upon the ground, twisting his thin limbs about in an agony of fear, ...
— The Firm of Girdlestone • Arthur Conan Doyle

... that many individuals have good collections of paintings, by the chief painters which this country has produced. It is impossible to pass through Flanders without being struck with the exactness with which its painters have represented the face of their country, and the persons of its inhabitants. Antwerp, on the whole, has a tolerably cheerful appearance. The promenade of Penipiere is pleasant, and much ...
— A tour through some parts of France, Switzerland, Savoy, Germany and Belgium • Richard Boyle Bernard

... three times. Mr. Rand took a rule from his pocket and measured the ground. Then he ran off by himself to the top of the little hill, and stood looking over the lake. All this time he had scarcely answered Mr. Curtis' questions. He was thinking. At last his face lighted up with ...
— Berties Home - or, the Way to be Happy • Madeline Leslie

... the guests wait as long as possible, and not to appear until after considerable coaxing by her mother. When a Votyak bridegroom comes after the bride on the wedding-day she is denied to him three times. After that she is searched for, dragged from her hiding-place, and her face covered with a cloth, while she screams and struggles. Then she is carried to the yard, placed on a blanket with her face down, and the bridegroom belabors her with a stick on a pillow which has been tied on her back. ...
— Primitive Love and Love-Stories • Henry Theophilus Finck

... I see when gentle Geordie was seeking to get other folk out of the Tolbooth forby Jocky Porteous? but ye are of my mind, hinny—better sit and rue, than flit and rue—ye needna look in my face sae amazed. I ken mair things than ...
— The Proverbs of Scotland • Alexander Hislop

... evening, at which time he was not thought to be in immediate danger; but early in the morning of Wednesday, the 4th[277], he expired[278]. Johnson was in the house, and thus mentions the event: 'I felt almost the last flutter of his pulse, and looked for the last time upon the face that for fifteen years had never been turned upon me but with respect and benignity[279].' Upon that day there was a Call of the LITERARY CLUB; but Johnson apologised for his absence by ...
— Life Of Johnson, Volume 4 (of 6) • Boswell

... the race, Here charge the sterling like a bull; There, as a man might wipe his face, Lie, pleased and ...
— The Letters of Robert Louis Stevenson - Volume 1 • Robert Louis Stevenson

... puddle of muddy water. There was no necessity for Andy steering into it, but he saw his opportunity, and a moment later one of the big pneumatic tires had plunged into the dirty fluid, spattering it all over Tom, some even going as high as his face. ...
— Tom Swift and his Submarine Boat - or, Under the Ocean for Sunken Treasure • Victor Appleton

... the adventurers themselves, now obscured in the titles given them to render them worthy their union with sovereigns. He resumed his fascinating confidences when they drove off after luncheon, and he resumed them after each separation from the rest of the party. Boyne listened with a flushed face and starting eyes, and when at last Trannel offered, upon a pledge of the most sacred nature from him never to reveal a word of what he said, he began to relate an adventure of which he was himself the hero. It was a bold travesty of one of the latest romances that Boyne had read, ...
— Henry James, Jr. • William Dean Howells

... the little damsel of twelve who leaves her childhood home and goes out as the bride of a boy or man—whose face she may never have seen but once or twice—to take up the hard life of a Hindu wife in the home of her father-in-law and mother-in-law. Yet from her infancy she has been bred in an atmosphere full of suggestion of the inferiority of womankind, ...
— Where Half The World Is Waking Up • Clarence Poe

... whom fate has brought you at the propitious moment. The Etruscans hold the country beyond the river. Mezentius was their king, a monster of cruelty, who invented unheard-of torments to gratify his vengeance. He would fasten the dead to the living, hand to hand and face to face, and leave the wretched victims to die in that dreadful embrace. At length the people cast him out, him and his house. They burned his palace and slew his friends. He escaped and took refuge with Turnus, who protects him with arms. The Etruscans demand that ...
— Bulfinch's Mythology • Thomas Bulfinch

... have seen fire in 'the face of every member. The First President called out "Order!" and said, "MM. de Beaufort, le Coadjuteur, and Broussel, you are accused, and ...
— The Memoirs of Cardinal de Retz, Complete • Jean Francois Paul de Gondi, Cardinal de Retz

... order, a grunt of satisfaction ran round the row of human derelicts. Tetlow shuddered, yet was moved and thrilled, too, as he glanced from face to face—those hideous hairy countenances, begrimed and beslimed, each countenance expressing in its own repulsive way the one emotion of gratified longing for food and drink. "Where did you ...
— The Grain Of Dust - A Novel • David Graham Phillips

... with your face to the south and think. If a thing comes from the south-west—from there, it must go to the ...
— Madam How and Lady Why - or, First Lessons in Earth Lore for Children • Charles Kingsley

... hour of the day that isn't employed in wringing money out of a desert. Come now!"—warmed by his own eloquence to a geniality equally hearty and false, Sir Caesar swung around again upon Mr. Pope—"I daresay we may call him, to his face, about ...
— Major Vigoureux • A. T. Quiller-Couch

... an odd cynical smile upon his face, but he did not immediately reply. This famous hotel had seemed a cavern of all the wonders when first he entered it, and he would not willingly abandon his illusions. The beautifully dressed women, ...
— Aladdin of London - or Lodestar • Sir Max Pemberton

... income remaining to the owner of the wealth after the tax is paid. Viewed in this way, taxes are seen to be borne to some extent by every one, by those who do not as well as by those who do actually meet the tax-collector face to face. The citizen with no taxable property is affected, far more than he realizes, by extravagance of government and by inequities in taxation, for the effects of most taxes are diffused so that every self-sustaining ...
— Modern Economic Problems - Economics Vol. II • Frank Albert Fetter



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