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Take   Listen
verb
Take  v. t.  (past took; past part. taken; pres. part. taking)  
1.
In an active sense; To lay hold of; to seize with the hands, or otherwise; to grasp; to get into one's hold or possession; to procure; to seize and carry away; to convey. Hence, specifically:
(a)
To obtain possession of by force or artifice; to get the custody or control of; to reduce into subjection to one's power or will; to capture; to seize; to make prisoner; as, to take an army, a city, or a ship; also, to come upon or befall; to fasten on; to attack; to seize; said of a disease, misfortune, or the like. "This man was taken of the Jews." "Men in their loose, unguarded hours they take; Not that themselves are wise, but others weak." "They that come abroad after these showers are commonly taken with sickness." "There he blasts the tree and takes the cattle And makes milch kine yield blood."
(b)
To gain or secure the interest or affection of; to captivate; to engage; to interest; to charm. "Neither let her take thee with her eyelids." "Cleombroutus was so taken with this prospect, that he had no patience." "I know not why, but there was a something in those half-seen features, a charm in the very shadow that hung over their imagined beauty, which took me more than all the outshining loveliness of her companions."
(c)
To make selection of; to choose; also, to turn to; to have recourse to; as, to take the road to the right. "Saul said, Cast lots between me and Jonathan my son. And Jonathan was taken." "The violence of storming is the course which God is forced to take for the destroying... of sinners."
(d)
To employ; to use; to occupy; hence, to demand; to require; as, it takes so much cloth to make a coat; it takes five hours to get to Boston from New York by car. "This man always takes time... before he passes his judgments."
(e)
To form a likeness of; to copy; to delineate; to picture; as, to take a picture of a person. "Beauty alone could beauty take so right."
(f)
To draw; to deduce; to derive. (R.) "The firm belief of a future judgment is the most forcible motive to a good life, because taken from this consideration of the most lasting happiness and misery."
(g)
To assume; to adopt; to acquire, as shape; to permit to one's self; to indulge or engage in; to yield to; to have or feel; to enjoy or experience, as rest, revenge, delight, shame; to form and adopt, as a resolution; used in general senses, limited by a following complement, in many idiomatic phrases; as, to take a resolution; I take the liberty to say.
(h)
To lead; to conduct; as, to take a child to church.
(i)
To carry; to convey; to deliver to another; to hand over; as, he took the book to the bindery; he took a dictionary with him. "He took me certain gold, I wot it well."
(j)
To remove; to withdraw; to deduct; with from; as, to take the breath from one; to take two from four.
2.
In a somewhat passive sense, to receive; to bear; to endure; to acknowledge; to accept. Specifically:
(a)
To accept, as something offered; to receive; not to refuse or reject; to admit. "Ye shall take no satisfaction for the life of a murderer." "Let not a widow be taken into the number under threescore."
(b)
To receive as something to be eaten or drunk; to partake of; to swallow; as, to take food or wine.
(c)
Not to refuse or balk at; to undertake readily; to clear; as, to take a hedge or fence.
(d)
To bear without ill humor or resentment; to submit to; to tolerate; to endure; as, to take a joke; he will take an affront from no man.
(e)
To admit, as, something presented to the mind; not to dispute; to allow; to accept; to receive in thought; to entertain in opinion; to understand; to interpret; to regard or look upon; to consider; to suppose; as, to take a thing for granted; this I take to be man's motive; to take men for spies. "You take me right." "Charity, taken in its largest extent, is nothing else but the science love of God and our neighbor." "(He) took that for virtue and affection which was nothing but vice in a disguise." "You'd doubt his sex, and take him for a girl."
(f)
To accept the word or offer of; to receive and accept; to bear; to submit to; to enter into agreement with; used in general senses; as, to take a form or shape. "I take thee at thy word." "Yet thy moist clay is pliant to command;... Not take the mold."
3.
To make a picture, photograph, or the like, of; as, to take a group or a scene. (Colloq.)
4.
To give or deliver (a blow to); to strike; hit; as, he took me in the face; he took me a blow on the head. (Obs. exc. Slang or Dial.)
To be taken aback, To take advantage of, To take air, etc. See under Aback, Advantage, etc.
To take aim, to direct the eye or weapon; to aim.
To take along, to carry, lead, or convey.
To take arms, to commence war or hostilities.
To take away, to carry off; to remove; to cause deprivation of; to do away with; as, a bill for taking away the votes of bishops. "By your own law, I take your life away."
To take breath, to stop, as from labor, in order to breathe or rest; to recruit or refresh one's self.
To take care, to exercise care or vigilance; to be solicitous. "Doth God take care for oxen?"
To take care of, to have the charge or care of; to care for; to superintend or oversee.
To take down.
(a)
To reduce; to bring down, as from a high, or higher, place; as, to take down a book; hence, to bring lower; to depress; to abase or humble; as, to take down pride, or the proud. "I never attempted to be impudent yet, that I was not taken down."
(b)
To swallow; as, to take down a potion.
(c)
To pull down; to pull to pieces; as, to take down a house or a scaffold.
(d)
To record; to write down; as, to take down a man's words at the time he utters them.
To take effect, To take fire. See under Effect, and Fire.
To take ground to the right or To take ground to the left (Mil.), to extend the line to the right or left; to move, as troops, to the right or left.
To take heart, to gain confidence or courage; to be encouraged.
To take heed, to be careful or cautious. "Take heed what doom against yourself you give."
To take heed to, to attend with care, as, take heed to thy ways.
To take hold of, to seize; to fix on.
To take horse, to mount and ride a horse.
To take in.
(a)
To inclose; to fence.
(b)
To encompass or embrace; to comprise; to comprehend.
(c)
To draw into a smaller compass; to contract; to brail or furl; as, to take in sail.
(d)
To cheat; to circumvent; to gull; to deceive. (Colloq.)
(e)
To admit; to receive; as, a leaky vessel will take in water.
(f)
To win by conquest. (Obs.) "For now Troy's broad-wayed town He shall take in."
(g)
To receive into the mind or understanding. "Some bright genius can take in a long train of propositions."
(h)
To receive regularly, as a periodical work or newspaper; to take. (Eng.)
To take in hand. See under Hand.
To take in vain, to employ or utter as in an oath. "Thou shalt not take the name of the Lord thy God in vain."
To take issue. See under Issue.
To take leave. See Leave, n., 2.
To take a newspaper, magazine, or the like, to receive it regularly, as on paying the price of subscription.
To take notice, to observe, or to observe with particular attention.
To take notice of. See under Notice.
To take oath, to swear with solemnity, or in a judicial manner.
To take on, to assume; to take upon one's self; as, to take on a character or responsibility.
To take one's own course, to act one's pleasure; to pursue the measures of one's own choice.
To take order for. See under Order.
To take order with, to check; to hinder; to repress. (Obs.)
To take orders.
(a)
To receive directions or commands.
(b)
(Eccl.) To enter some grade of the ministry. See Order, n., 10.
To take out.
(a)
To remove from within a place; to separate; to deduct.
(b)
To draw out; to remove; to clear or cleanse from; as, to take out a stain or spot from cloth.
(c)
To produce for one's self; as, to take out a patent.
(d)
To put an end to; as, to take the conceit out of a man.
(e)
To escort; as, to take out to dinner.
To take over, to undertake; to take the management of. (Eng.)
To take part, to share; as, they take part in our rejoicing.
To take part with, to unite with; to join with.
To take place, To take root, To take sides, To take stock, etc. See under Place, Root, Side, etc.
To take the air.
(a)
(Falconry) To seek to escape by trying to rise higher than the falcon; said of a bird.
(b)
See under Air.
To take the field. (Mil.) See under Field.
To take thought, to be concerned or anxious; to be solicitous.
To take to heart. See under Heart.
To take to task, to reprove; to censure.
To take up.
(a)
To lift; to raise.
(b)
To buy or borrow; as, to take up goods to a large amount; to take up money at the bank.
(c)
To begin; as, to take up a lamentation.
(d)
To gather together; to bind up; to fasten or to replace; as, to take up raveled stitches; specifically (Surg.), to fasten with a ligature.
(e)
To engross; to employ; to occupy or fill; as, to take up the time; to take up a great deal of room.
(f)
To take permanently. "Arnobius asserts that men of the finest parts... took up their rest in the Christian religion."
(g)
To seize; to catch; to arrest; as, to take up a thief; to take up vagabonds.
(h)
To admit; to believe; to receive. (Obs.) "The ancients took up experiments upon credit."
(i)
To answer by reproof; to reprimand; to berate. "One of his relations took him up roundly."
(j)
To begin where another left off; to keep up in continuous succession; to take up (a topic, an activity). "Soon as the evening shades prevail, The moon takes up the wondrous tale."
(k)
To assume; to adopt as one's own; to carry on or manage; as, to take up the quarrels of our neighbors; to take up current opinions. "They take up our old trade of conquering."
(l)
To comprise; to include. "The noble poem of Palemon and Arcite... takes up seven years."
(m)
To receive, accept, or adopt for the purpose of assisting; to espouse the cause of; to favor.
(n)
To collect; to exact, as a tax; to levy; as, to take up a contribution. "Take up commodities upon our bills."
(o)
To pay and receive; as, to take up a note at the bank.
(p)
(Mach.) To remove, as by an adjustment of parts; as, to take up lost motion, as in a bearing; also, to make tight, as by winding, or drawing; as, to take up slack thread in sewing.
(q)
To make up; to compose; to settle; as, to take up a quarrel. (Obs.) (s) To accept from someone, as a wager or a challenge; as, J. took M. up on his challenge.
To take up arms. Same as To take arms, above.
To take upon one's self.
(a)
To assume; to undertake; as, he takes upon himself to assert that the fact is capable of proof.
(b)
To appropriate to one's self; to allow to be imputed to, or inflicted upon, one's self; as, to take upon one's self a punishment.
To take up the gauntlet. See under Gauntlet.






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Take" Quotes from Famous Books



... what I'd rather have it that way than for them to be too friendly. More 'mixes' come from herders visiting than any other cause, and I wouldn't run that band through the chutes for three hundred dollars. It would take that much fat off of them, to say nothing of the bother. ...
— The Fighting Shepherdess • Caroline Lockhart

... to stop, Miss Norah," said the stock-man. "Axed him, I did, if he'd y'r lave, and he gev me back-answers as free as y' please. I was perfickly calm, an never losht me timper, an' towld him I'd pull him off av the little harse if he'd not the lave to take him; an' he put the comether on me by cantherin' off. So I waited, thinkin' not to worry y', an' that he'd be comin' back; or more be token Bobs widout him, an' small loss. But he's elsewhere yit, so I kem in f'r ...
— Mates at Billabong • Mary Grant Bruce

... circumstance in my conduct that can authorize such a suspicion, I cannot but observe, that Mr. Vere seems to believe that I have had some hand in the atrocious violence which has been offered to his daughter. I request you, gentlemen, to take notice of my explicit denial of a charge so dishonourable; and that, although I can pardon the bewildering feelings of a father in such a moment, yet, if any other gentleman," (he looked hard at Sir ...
— The Black Dwarf • Sir Walter Scott

... come so easily to an acquaintance with Nature. Never ride in the country, or anywhere within Nature's dearest precincts, when you can as well go on foot. You cannot see things flying by you. Do not adopt the custom of most pedestrians, that of getting over the ground as rapidly as possible. Take daily walks, no matter what the weather is; but do not go too far. Irregularity in this exercise is harmful. It is far better to walk two miles daily than ten miles at one time, and fifteen a week hence. Go to ...
— Hold Up Your Heads, Girls! • Annie H. Ryder

... see a train approaching during a minute. The event which is the life of nature within that train during the minute is of great complexity and the expression of its relations and of the ingredients of its character baffles us. If we take one second of that minute, the more limited event which is thus obtained is simpler in respect to its ingredients, and shorter and shorter times such as a tenth of that second, or a hundredth, or a thousandth—so long as we have a definite rule giving a definite succession of ...
— The Concept of Nature - The Tarner Lectures Delivered in Trinity College, November 1919 • Alfred North Whitehead

... or exposed to the hazard of being taken. It thus happened, that many letters never arrived at their destination, although duplicates and triplicates were sent. Again, the Committee had no Secretary to take charge of the papers, and no regular place of deposit; the members themselves were perpetually changing, and each had equal access to the papers, and was equally responsible for their safe keeping. They were often in the hands of the Secretary of Congress, and of other members ...
— The Diplomatic Correspondence of the American Revolution, Vol. I • Various

... revival had culminated in Italy it began to be heard of north of the Alps. France was the first country to take up the study of Greek, a professorship being established at Paris in 1458. There was but little interest in the subject, however, or in any of the new studies, until two events of political importance, forty years later, ...
— THE HISTORY OF EDUCATION • ELLWOOD P. CUBBERLEY

... Take as an instance of an idea the continuity and coincident distinctness of nature; or this,—vegetable life is always striving to be something that it is not; animal life to be itself.[1] Hence, in a plant the parts, as the root, the stem, the branches, leaves, &c. remain after they have each ...
— Specimens of the Table Talk of S.T.Coleridge • Coleridge

... have been Wentworth who had sacrificed himself for her with what desperate rapidity she would have rescued him. How calm her agonised heart would be now. Fay was beginning to learn that it is ill to take a service save from the hand we love. And perhaps, too, in her heart she knew that Wentworth would never have sacrificed himself for her, for Michael ...
— Prisoners - Fast Bound In Misery And Iron • Mary Cholmondeley

... that she had made no advances to him, without considering that she had no leisure for it; his pride was offended; but the attempt which he made to take her from the rest of her ...
— Marguerite de Navarre - Memoirs of Marguerite de Valois Queen of Navarre • Marguerite de Navarre

... time to smooth her hair, pull shut her dress band at the neck, put on her collar, and shiny goldstone pin, her white apron, and rub her little flannel rag, with rice flour on it, on her nose to take away the shine. I had made a mess ...
— Laddie • Gene Stratton Porter

... Go down on Thursday and come back on Saturday. I shall be at home. There's a five-pound note for the expenses." Stemm slowly took the note, but grunted and grumbled. The girls were nuisances to him, and he didn't want to take them an outing. They wouldn't care to go before July, and he didn't care to go at all. "You can go when you please," said Sir Thomas. Stemm growled and grumbled, and at last left ...
— Ralph the Heir • Anthony Trollope

... Fritz, after a moment's interval. "Time is up! The guard is calling out for the passengers to take their seats. Eric, old fellow, good-bye, and God bless you! You will write to the mother and me from every ...
— Fritz and Eric - The Brother Crusoes • John Conroy Hutcheson

... Mr. Crawford done more brilliant realistic work than here. But his realism is only the case and cover for those intense feelings which, placed under no matter what humble conditions, produce the most dramatic and the most tragic situations.... This is a secret of genius, to take the most coarse and common material, the meanest surroundings, the most sordid material prospects, and out of the vehement passions which sometimes dominate all human beings to build up with these poor elements, scenes and passages the dramatic and emotional power ...
— Stradella • F(rancis) Marion Crawford

... Take the terms Fire and Water. In former times all liquid substances were supposed to be liquid because they possessed something in common; this hypothetical something was called the Element, Water. Similarly, the view prevailed until comparatively recent times, that burning ...
— The Story of Alchemy and the Beginnings of Chemistry • M. M. Pattison Muir

... balls; at nine in the morning people on business begin to clamor for her husband, at ten, if he is a Congressman, he goes to his committee, at twelve Congress meets to adjourn at five; and if after that some political dinner, at which great things are to be adjusted, does not take him to itself till nearly midnight, constituents, schemers and lobbyists do. What sort of home-life there can be where the master of the house is out all day and the mistress is out all night, remains ...
— Lippincott's Magazine. Vol. XII, No. 33. December, 1873. • Various

... also leave a memorial of their vandalism? They did so in Schoenhausen, the pleasure-palace of the consort of Frederick the Great, who had left it a few days previous, by express command of the king, to take up her residence in Magdeburg. Eight Russian hussars forced themselves into the palace, and, with terrible threats, demanded the king's plate. Only the castellan and his wife, and a few of the royal servants, had been left behind to protect the ...
— The Merchant of Berlin - An Historical Novel • L. Muhlbach

... to take before in fact or to take before in thought; in the former sense it is allied with prevent; in the latter, with the synonyms above given. This is coming to be the prevalent and favorite use. We expect that which we have good reason to believe will happen; as, a boy expects ...
— English Synonyms and Antonyms - With Notes on the Correct Use of Prepositions • James Champlin Fernald

... uncle's religion what am I to say? Was it utter hypocrisy, or had it at any time a vein of sincerity in it? I cannot say. I don't believe that he had any heart left for religion, which is the highest form of affection, to take hold of. Perhaps he was a sceptic with misgivings about the future, but past the time for finding anything reliable in it. The devil approached the citadel of his heart by stealth, with many zigzags and parallels. The idea of marrying me to his son by fair means, then by foul, and, when that wicked ...
— Uncle Silas - A Tale of Bartram-Haugh • J.S. Le Fanu

... "your urbanity is entirely French; it is of the same country with myself! I press in imagination the hand which you refuse me. Take your measures,—act as it may seem good to you; I will wait till you ...
— A Voyage in a Balloon (1852) • Jules Verne

... he retorted, snatching away his hand. "This burning, longing heart thirsts for other feelings! Oh, woman! I know the wretch who has trodden down the flower of flowers in your heart, and I, madman that I am, can sing his praises, can take his part; and cost what it may, I will still do so as long as you. . . . But perhaps the glorious flower may strike new roots in the soil of hatred and I, the hapless wretch who water it, may ...
— Uarda • Georg Ebers

... ground of which he was to be hanged. These are the "proofs" of his responsibility for the distribution of treasonable Russian proclamations in Bohemia, repeated manifestations of sympathy with the enemy, and the refusal of Czech deputies to take part in any ...
— Independent Bohemia • Vladimir Nosek

... Empire sends back to his palaces all the loot that he can collect, on innumerable transport waggons, amid the applause of his proud father's subjects. He is of course carrying out the new gospel of the Fatherland that everyone has a perfect right to whatever he is strong enough to take. But some day that doctrine may spread from the exalted and sacred circle in which it is now the guiding star to the "cannon fodder." Some day the common people will have learnt the lesson which is being so sedulously taught to them both ...
— A Surgeon in Belgium • Henry Sessions Souttar

... feel bound or even permitted to press on other people, are not the less forces for being latent. They shape ideals, and it is ideals that inspire conduct. They do this, though from afar, and though he who possesses them may not presume to take the world into his confidence. Finally, unless a man follows out ideas to their full conclusion without fear what the conclusion may be, whether he thinks it expedient to make his thought and its goal fully known or not, it is impossible that he should acquire a commanding grasp of principles. ...
— On Compromise • John Morley

... replied; "but it will be a comparatively trifling amount, I'm afraid. The Guardian has just about as much as it is willing to risk in the congested district of Boston, and Silas Osgood and Company are under instructions to keep our liability down to its present amount and take little new business." ...
— White Ashes • Sidney R. Kennedy and Alden C. Noble

... it—who, eating plentifully, have never themselves taken a mouthful from the earth. They have never known a moment's real life of their own. Lying up to the sun in warmth and comfort—but leafless—they do not think of the hosts under them, smothered, strangled, starved. They take nothing at first hand. They experience described emotion, and think prepared thoughts. They live not in life, but in printed reports of life. They gather the odour of odours, not the odour itself: they do not hear, they overhear. A ...
— Adventures In Contentment • David Grayson

... a copy in my kit bag. The very one we used to read together. Take it and keep it or throw it overboard. I don't want ...
— The Girl on the Boat • Pelham Grenville Wodehouse

... dazzling visions, he felt a sort of intoxication, which, paralyzing the power of thought, concentrated all his faculties in the one sense of sight; and just as we sometimes seek in vain to satisfy unquenchable thirst, the burning look of the Indian sought, as it were, with devouring avidity, to take in all the rare perfections of the young lady. Verily, never had two more divine types of beauty met face to face. Adrienne and Djalma were the very ideal of a handsome youth and maiden. There seemed to ...
— The Wandering Jew, Complete • Eugene Sue

... Much of it is based upon pure speculation, but publicists in Germany make no disguise of the Fatherland's desire to win and make a political and economic unit of the countries now embraced in Germany, Austria-Hungary, Servia, perhaps Rumania, Bulgaria, and Turkey in Europe and Asia. One has but to take up the map and outline this aggregation of states and turn to a table of statistics to realize the enormous advantages and powers of such a unit. Politically and economically, it would dominate Europe as has no other ...
— The Story of the Great War, Volume II (of VIII) - History of the European War from Official Sources • Various

... and who, on sudden impulse, have drawn forth what I so long and anxiously kept secret, will you desert me at this awful moment? or, to the last contending for our abbey's rights, implore these warriors from the holy land, not to take arms against a sacred ...
— The Mirror of Taste, and Dramatic Censor, Vol. I, No. 6, June 1810 • Various

... go to her. 'Miss Phoebe,' I will say—oh, ma'am, so reverently—'Miss Phoebe, my beautiful, most estimable of women, let me take care of you for ...
— Quality Street - A Comedy • J. M. Barrie

... Mother Fox! How safe and snug and warm was his home under the roots of the old hickory tree, and how he did wish that he was safely there! But it would never do to go there now, for that would tell Bowser where he lived, and Bowser would take Farmer Brown there, and that would be the end of Reddy Fox and of Mother Fox and of all ...
— Mother West Wind's Children • Thornton W. Burgess

... Frank," said the old master's mate; "and, as peer of the realm, coming on board to visit the ship, you are entitled to a salute. Send up and say you expect one, and then W—- must have the guard up, and pay you proper respect. I'll be hanged if I don't take the message, if ...
— Newton Forster - The Merchant Service • Captain Frederick Marryat

... paradoxical attitude, they frequently speak and act in the most simple, touching way! It is common to hear one say to the stretcher-bearer who comes to fetch him: "Take my comrade here first; he is much more wounded than I; I can wait...." And that when it means lying on the ground under the bombardment, thirsty, feverish, feeling his strength ebb with his blood. Before any ...
— World's War Events, Volume III • Various

... ALIUD QUAM BENE AUSUS VANA CONTEMNERE: in which sort of things it is the manner of men first to wonder that any such thing should be possible, and after it is found out to wonder again how the world should miss it so long. Of this nature I take to be the invention and discovery of ...
— Valerius Terminus: of the Interpretation of Nature • Sir Francis Bacon

... that he was going to place himself in a voluntary prison.[37] He first went to Rome, and opened negotiations with Alfonso's agents. In reply to their communications, the duke wrote upon March 22, 1578, as follows: 'We are content to take Tasso back; but first he must recognize the fact that he is full of melancholic humors, and that his old notions of enmities and persecutions are solely caused by the said humors. Among other signs ...
— Renaissance in Italy, Volumes 1 and 2 - The Catholic Reaction • John Addington Symonds

... the other hand, Just as it is a sin to swear falsely so is it to swear by false gods. Yet it is lawful to take advantage of an oath of one who has sworn by false gods, as Augustine says (ad Public. Ep. xlvii). Therefore it is lawful to demand an oath from one ...
— Summa Theologica, Part II-II (Secunda Secundae) • Thomas Aquinas

... qualifications from you, not very learned, far from industrious, unused to publish, I do now promise that when you shall have brought into light your intended letters in behalf of revelation I will answer them. I hope you will take it as an encouragement to write that you are sure you shall have an answer. I mean you should, and I am sure I shall think myself greatly honoured if you will descend so far as to reply to my present answer. I know you have been used in controversies to have ...
— Answer to Dr. Priestley's Letters to a Philosophical Unbeliever • Matthew Turner

... 'Train up a child in the way he should go, and when he is old he will not depart from it.' This is divine; and the opposite is equally true. Train up a child in the way he should not go, or—which comes to about the same thing—leave him to take the wrong way of his own accord, and when he is old he will not depart from that. His tread will be heavier and heavier upon the broad and beaten track. 'Men do not gather grapes of thorns, nor figs of thistles.' 'Can the Ethiopian change his skin, or the leopard his spots? Then may those also ...
— Popular Education - For the use of Parents and Teachers, and for Young Persons of Both Sexes • Ira Mayhew

... vanished in a cloud of dust on the London road. Then he saw what he sought. Coming across the downs a mile away was the bent figure of a man who stopped now and again to look about, as though uncertain as to the direction he should take. Poltavo, lying flat upon the ground, his glasses fixed upon the man, waited, watching the slow ...
— The Secret House • Edgar Wallace

... him to desist; but he never deigned to take the slightest notice of me. I repeated my order in a louder and more angry tone; whereupon he turned his eyes upon me, and said, in a most contemptuous tone, "Chut, ti beque: quitte moue tranquille, ou tende sinon malheur ka ...
— At Last • Charles Kingsley

... having had my say, I will take my leave of you, as duty calls me back to my regiment. I trust that the frankness with which I have ...
— In the Irish Brigade - A Tale of War in Flanders and Spain • G. A. Henty

... who throw philosophy out of entertainments do worse than those who take away a light. For the candle being removed, the temperate and sober guests will not become worse than they were before, being more concerned to reverence than to see one another. But if dulness and disregard to good learning wait upon the wine, Minerva's ...
— Essays and Miscellanies - The Complete Works Volume 3 • Plutarch

... insufficient, or the web of the shoe too wide, and too great a bearing thus given to the sole, then we get, first, an undue pressure upon the last-named portion of the foot a bruise, and, finally, lameness. The correct bearing should take in the whole of the wall and the whole of the white line, and should just impinge upon the sole. Above all, the heels of the shoe should be of full length, otherwise, if the shoe is worn just a little too long, its heels are carried under the sole of the foot, and ...
— Diseases of the Horse's Foot • Harry Caulton Reeks

... many errors which sculptors who do not possess it commit. A knowledge of mechanical principles is also requisite; and such knowledge not being usually possessed, grave mechanical mistakes are frequently made. Take an instance. For the stability of a figure it is needful that the perpendicular from the centre of gravity—"the line of direction," as it is called—should fall within the base of support; and hence it happens, that when a man assumes the attitude known as "standing ...
— Essays on Education and Kindred Subjects - Everyman's Library • Herbert Spencer

... of the internal inguinal hernia are (as to number) variously described by authors. Thus with respect to the conjoined tendon, the hernia is said, in some instances, to take an investment of this structure; in others, to pass through a cleft in its fibres; in others, to escape by its outer margin. Again, the cremaster muscle is stated by some to cover this hernia; by ...
— Surgical Anatomy • Joseph Maclise

... The United States are represented as deadly enemies of the whole Latin Race and of the monarchies of Europe, which must fall to their feet, if that race does not commence a crusade against the heretics, and take the sword against the pirates, thieves and bankrupts of the ...
— Secret Enemies of True Republicanism • Andrew B. Smolnikar

... the first time since it entered his body, Ernie's soul arose above the sordid flesh. It came as from a great distance and slowly, but it came to take its frightened, subdued stand ...
— The Rose in the Ring • George Barr McCutcheon

... of the scope of the society's work was not approved by its founder, Allan Ramsay, who thought it beneath the dignity of such an institution to take an interest in the making of ruffles or the brewing of strong ale, and feared besides that it would introduce a new set of very unintellectual members, to the serious prejudice of the society's debates. An essay on taste was ...
— Life of Adam Smith • John Rae

... days; the result being that a half jocular proposal of mine that we should extend our wanderings to Australia and beat up the quarters of these good folk has crystallised into the serious resolution to do so, provided that suitable passenger accommodation to take us there can be met with. This accident of your having accepted a freight for Sydney settles that part of the question, of course, for we will go with you—that is, if you are willing to ...
— The Cruise of the "Esmeralda" • Harry Collingwood

... night and stole possession of a hill overlooking the post, he praised his craft as that of a true warrior; but as to his letting his pipers play at daybreak, and give the enemy notice of his presence, so that the Indians could take to trees and shoot his Highlanders down with no danger to themselves, he could only suppose that Colonel Grant had got drunk ...
— Stories Of Ohio - 1897 • William Dean Howells

... kettle on, an' git the tea, an' I'll be ready in no time," said Mrs Yabsley. "W'en I was your age, I used ter take 'arf a day ter doll meself up, an' then git down the street with a brass band playin' inside me silly 'ead; but now, gimme somethin' new, if it's only a bit o' ribbon in me 'at, an' I feel dressed ...
— Jonah • Louis Stone

... man, and yet held me at a distance with consummate ease, and twisted my foil from my hand with a mere turn of his wrist. Still, he had the grace to commend me when the bout was ended, and I at once arranged to take two lessons daily while I ...
— A Soldier of Virginia • Burton Egbert Stevenson

... hirelings,—you have always in it a peculiar interest. You care more for it than you care for all the forests of Norway or America. You have planted it, and that is sufficient to make it peculiar amongst the trees of the world. This personal interest I take in every inmate of my garden, and this interest I have increased by sedulous watching. But, really, trees and plants resemble human beings in many ways. You shake a packet of seed into your forcing-frame; and while some grow, others pine and die, or struggle ...
— Dreamthorp - A Book of Essays Written in the Country • Alexander Smith

... not exist when first you came here—the claim of my affection and of my daughter's. This, I will confess, has given me more pleasure than anything which has happened here for a long time. I have no son and I take it as the beneficent work of Providence that one should be sent to me as you were sent. My daughter would possibly have married a scoundrel if the circumstances had been otherwise. So, you see, that while you are now established here by right of our affection, ...
— Aladdin of London - or Lodestar • Sir Max Pemberton

... this the impulse of the moment? Do you not fear a more than ordinary severe hurricane? Remember, you have praised us so much for being such good sailors, and so obedient to orders, that you must put us to the proof; and the more you take us into your confidence, the more well-behaved ...
— Yr Ynys Unyg - The Lonely Island • Julia de Winton

... bested, when up came Messer Lambertuccio, exclaiming:—'Where art thou, traitor?' I planted myself in the doorway, and kept him from entering, and seeing that I was not minded to give him admittance, he was courteous enough, after not a little parley, to take himself off, as you saw." Whereupon:—"Wife," quoth the husband, "thou didst very right. Great indeed had been the scandal, had some one been slain here, and 'twas a gross affront on Messer Lambertuccio's part to pursue a fugitive within the house." ...
— The Decameron, Vol. II. • Giovanni Boccaccio

... the people may misunderstand you," observed Mrs Lerew, who reflected that her husband had made an acknowledgment which some of his parishioners might take up, and perhaps cause him annoyance; but the vicar was not a man to be withheld from expressing his opinion by any such fears. He was aware that he would be supported by Sir Reginald and Lady Bygrave, and he secretly held such ...
— Clara Maynard - The True and the False - A Tale of the Times • W.H.G. Kingston

... lays a baho, previously prepared, sprinkles it with the mixture with which he has described the line of the walls, and then lays the corner stone upon it. As he does this, he expresses his hope that the walls "will take good root hold," and stand ...
— A Study of Pueblo Architecture: Tusayan and Cibola • Victor Mindeleff and Cosmos Mindeleff

... be a very eccentric fellow; but as these are mostly matters of convention, the argument is just as valid against us as against him. "Strange people, those foreigners," he may say, and actually does say; "they make their compass point north instead of south. They take off their hats in company instead of keeping them on. They mount a horse on its left instead of on its right side. They begin dinner with soup instead of dessert, and end it with dessert instead of soup. They drink their wine cold instead of hot. Their books all open at the wrong end, and the lines ...
— The Civilization Of China • Herbert A. Giles

... companions in time to take the noon-train for Baltimore. Our company was gaining in number as it moved onwards. We had found upon the train from New York a lovely, lonely lady, the wife of one of our most spirited Massachusetts officers, the brave ...
— The Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table • Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr. (The Physician and Poet not the Jurist)

... not going to find anybody to replace you," burst forth John. "I declare, Lionel, if you do go, I'll take on Roy, just to spite you and your old tenants. By the way, though, talking of Roy, who do you think has come back to Deerham?" he broke off, rather ...
— Verner's Pride • Mrs. Henry Wood

... offices would be closed. Nor was there any immediate prospect of her finding a messenger. She supposed that tradesmen came to the house and that the kitchen door was somewhere under her window, but tradesmen do not call on Sundays. She held the little package irresolutely in her hand. She must take her chance to-day. To-morrow would be Monday and it ...
— The Green Rust • Edgar Wallace

... that trade yet farther, and this again augments and stimulates other trades. Capital may long lie idle in a stagnant condition of industry; the mercantile securities which experienced bankers know to be good do not augment, and they will not invent other securities, or take ...
— Lombard Street: A Description of the Money Market • Walter Bagehot

... wave of the hand: 'Out of a sort of feeling for his sisters—I like him for it. Now what I want to ask you, Tom, is, whether we can't assist him in some way! Why couldn't we take him into our office, and fix him there, eh? If he works well—we're both getting old, and my brats are chicks—we might, by-and-by, ...
— The Shaving of Shagpat • George Meredith

... great tomb of man. The golden sun, The planets, all the infinite host of heaven, Are shining on the sad abodes of death, Through the still lapse of ages. All that tread The globe are but a handful to the tribes That slumber in its bosom.—Take the wings Of morning, pierce the Barcan wilderness, Or lose thyself in the continuous woods Where rolls the Oregon, and hears no sound Save his own dashings—yet the dead are there; And millions in those solitudes, since first The flight of years began, have laid them down ...
— Library Of The World's Best Literature, Ancient And Modern, Vol 6 • Various

... Take Mathematics. Numbers inhere in all harmony. By numbers harmony can be expressed far more severely than by Poetry, and so successfully up to a point, that poets have borrowed the very word to dignify their poor efforts. They "lisp in numbers"—or so they say: ...
— Poetry • Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch

... tap-root reaches the sub-soil moisture it is well able to take care of the tree; and both cultivation and fertilization may then be stopped. In fact, by this time practically no further care is needed in the nut orchard with the exception of that required at the harvesting time, and this is a pleasant and easy occupation, especially ...
— English Walnuts - What You Need to Know about Planting, Cultivating and - Harvesting This Most Delicious of Nuts • Various

... these rebellious angels, some still rove among the planetary spheres, and give trouble to the good angels; others pervade the atmosphere about the earth, carrying lightning, storm, drought, and hail; others infest earthly society, tempting men to sin; but Peter Lombard and St. Thomas Aquinas take pains to show that the work of these devils is, after all, but to discipline man or ...
— History of the Warfare of Science with Theology in Christendom • Andrew Dickson White

... no one; he resolved to prosecute the inquiry alone. He determined to go there and await whatever might turn up in the shape of events. He would not for once take any companion; such adventures were often best prosecuted alone—they were most easily brought to something like an explanatory position, one person can often consider matters more coolly than more. At all events, there is more secrecy than ...
— Varney the Vampire - Or the Feast of Blood • Thomas Preskett Prest

... day we had so little idea of the vicinity of the engagement, that I drove out with a Belgian family in an open carriage towards the Bois de Soignies. But we were obliged to retreat precipitately, and take another direction across the country, and pass through a different barriere through the town to my residence. They wished me to accept an instant asylum with them. The house of Monsieur D'H—— was built over part of the old palace; and he had prepared one of the extensive caves ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction, Vol. 20, - Issue 570, October 13, 1832 • Various

... superstitious old man, with a singular fondness for visiting solitary and gloomy places, particularly churchyards; and he soon began to take the little girl with him on such strolls. But he discovered, much to his amazement, that though she listened with avidity to the tales he told her of the romantic and mysterious events that had occurred ...
— Historic Ghosts and Ghost Hunters • H. Addington Bruce

... sparkles on the hearth, Not less if unattended and alone, Than when both young and old sit gathered round, And take delight in its activity; Even so this happy creature of herself Is all-sufficient; Solitude to her Is blithe society, who fills the air With ...
— A Biography of Edmund Spenser • John W. Hales

... Auslaender, kann Deutschland verlassen" (no Englishman, no foreigner can leave Germany). I rushed off immediately to the Polizei Amt and found it only too terribly true. Worse! Mr. W—— and Mr. S——, who tried to arrange for a steamer on the Rhine to take us away, have been arrested, and are being tried on a trumped-up charge of forgery, and the Company who were the go-betweens demand 3,000 marks because the boat came a certain distance down the river ...
— A War-time Journal, Germany 1914 and German Travel Notes • Harriet Julia Jephson

... to know if there is any business, or can be any business, that should take precedence of these propositions of ...
— A Report of the Debates and Proceedings in the Secret Sessions of the Conference Convention • Lucius Eugene Chittenden

... Dabbs—a very intelligent man, who started first in the hot-chestnut line. Mr. Dabbs has generally a fairly good stock of books, which varies between one and two thousand volumes, a selection of which are daily displayed on four or five barrows, and varying from two a penny ('You must take two') up to higher-priced volumes. Curiously enough, he finds that theological books pay the best, and it is of this class that his stock chiefly consists. Just as book-hunters have many 'finds' to gloat over, so perhaps booksellers have to ...
— The Book-Hunter in London - Historical and Other Studies of Collectors and Collecting • William Roberts

... all the girls will be glad of a little time to themselves," said the Senora. "Let us all do as we like until dinner-time. I've been longing to sit in the shade of the big magnolia ever since I came. I shall take a book and spend my two hours out there, and any one who wishes may share ...
— Blue Bonnet's Ranch Party • C. E. Jacobs

... including a dinner, at three louis an hour, and he obtained the photograph into the bargain." "It appears to me that he might have obtained it anyhow by means of some artifice and without ... without ... without being obliged to take the original at the same time." "Oh! she is pretty, and Jacques did not mind the least. And then, I wanted some details about her, physical details about her figure, her breast, her complexion, a thousand ...
— The Works of Guy de Maupassant, Vol. 1 (of 8) - Boule de Suif and Other Stories • Guy de Maupassant

... last; "we can't give up the schooner. They would take our stores as well, and then where are we? Marooned, by Jove! How far do you suppose we are from the nearest town? Three hundred miles wouldn't be a bad guess, and they've got the loot—our ambergris—I'll swear to that. They didn't leave that ...
— Moran of the Lady Letty • Frank Norris

... to take His healing about!" cried Willie—"just as the doctors' boys take the medicines about in baskets: grannie tells me they do in the big towns. I should like to be the Great ...
— Gutta-Percha Willie • George MacDonald

... the time, against him, said no more, and walked off. But it was not always thus with Mr Chick. He was often in the ascendant himself, and at those times punished Louisa roundly. In their matrimonial bickerings they were, upon the whole, a well-matched, fairly-balanced, give-and-take couple. It would have been, generally speaking, very difficult to have betted on the winner. Often when Mr Chick seemed beaten, he would suddenly make a start, turn the tables, clatter them about the ears of Mrs Chick, and carry all before him. Being liable himself to similar ...
— Dombey and Son • Charles Dickens

... that's a fact!" quoth Mother Rigby, in admiration at her own handiwork. "I've made many a puppet since I've been a witch but methinks this the finest of them all. 'Tis almost too good for a scarecrow. And, by the by, I'll just fill a fresh pipe of tobacco, and then take him out ...
— Short Stories of Various Types • Various

... the bluff comes down to the river, and, consequently, we had to take to the hills, which were mostly deep sand, making heavy hauling. This trail brought us into Ash Hollow, a few miles from its mouth. Coming down to where it opened out on the Platte, about noon, we turned out ...
— In the Early Days along the Overland Trail in Nebraska Territory, in 1852 • Gilbert L. Cole

... can't," replied the detective. "We'd be just as bad then in the eyes of the law as before. Reward, five thousand, bank lose twenty-five thousand—thirty thousand, in odd figures, is least we could take. Even that wouldn't be reg'lar; but it would be a safe risk, seeing all the bank cares for's to get its ...
— Romance of California Life • John Habberton

... being alone. It is because I am so far away from every living thing, and there's no sun and no stream here. (Turns toward him.) If we feel that we must die, you can close the smoke-hole, and I will fill the hut with smoke. We shall lie down side by side. (Touches his hand.) I will take your hand, and we shall dream that we are going out ...
— Modern Icelandic Plays - Eyvind of the Hills; The Hraun Farm • Jhann Sigurjnsson

... some of these bricks (Monument de Ninive, plates 155, 156). Among the motives there reproduced there is one that we have already seen in the bas-reliefs (fig. 67). It is a goat standing in the collected attitude he would take on a point of rock. The head of the ibex is also a not uncommon motive (LAYARD, Monuments, first series, plate 87, fig. 2; ...
— A History of Art in Chaldaea & Assyria, v. 1 • Georges Perrot

... little roan filly,—Snow-ball, good by,—my new patent double-barrelled percussion—ah, I give you all up!—Order the tandem, my dear Tom, whenever you please; whisk me up to the fairy scenes you have so often and admirably described; and, above all things, take me as an humble and docile pupil under your august auspices and tuition." Says ...
— Real Life In London, Volumes I. and II. • Pierce Egan

... wary Drake shook his head warningly at Mr. Bolles to keep off that subject, and he glanced in the direction of slumbering Uncle Pasco. Uncle Pasco was quite aware of all this. "I wouldn't take another lonesome job so soon," pursued Drake, "but I want the money. I've been working eleven months along the Owyhee as a sort of junior boss, and I'd earned my vacation. Just got it started hot in Portland, when biff! old Vogel telegraphs me. Well, I'll be saving ...
— The Jimmyjohn Boss and Other Stories • Owen Wister

... softly. "Judson's on the crest right now. Oh, let him ride. He's doomed, so let him have his little strut. He comes to me a few days backward into the gone on, and says, says he, important and commercial like, 'O'mie, I shall not need you any more. I've got a person to take your place.' 'All right,' I responds, respectful, 'just as you please. When shall I lave off?' 'To-morrow mornin',' he answers, an' looks at me as if to say, 'Nothin' left for you but the poor-house.' And indade, a clerk under Judson don't make ...
— The Price of the Prairie - A Story of Kansas • Margaret Hill McCarter

... office. He had come to the door when he felt that undercurrent of anxiety which showed itself on the white faces of the General and his assistant, who stood gazing mutely at the letter the former held. He heard the General call Father Tomasso. "Take this to Father Pietro, my son," he said. Then he listened to the younger ...
— The City and the World and Other Stories • Francis Clement Kelley

... before General Marbot, without any idea that I was his son. The sergeant explained why I had been arrested. Then my father, looking very severe, gave me a lively dressing down, after which admonition, he said to the sergeant, "Take this Hussar to the citadel." I left without saying a word, and without General Suchet, who did not know me, suspecting that the scene he had just witnessed had taken place between a father and his son. It was not until the next day that he learned the truth, and he has often spoken to me ...
— The Memoirs of General the Baron de Marbot, Translated by - Oliver C. Colt • Baron de Marbot

... of the sort. But I'm nervous. I feel as though great things were on foot. The air is charged with great things. Something big is going to take place.' ...
— "The Pomp of Yesterday" • Joseph Hocking

... Yorimasa a famous sword named Shishi-no-[o], (King of Wild Boars), and to give him a lovely maid of honor named Ayami, to wife. And so the brave and the fair were married, and to this day the fame of Yorimasa is like the "ume-take-matsu," (plum-blossom, bamboo and ...
— Japanese Fairy World - Stories from the Wonder-Lore of Japan • William Elliot Griffis

... because the hunters will see you if you go by day. And you must not take your herd near the villages where ...
— More Jataka Tales • Re-told by Ellen C. Babbitt

... just before Christmas he began to be sorry that he had broken up the sled Santa Claus had given him the Christmas before. In fact, Tommy had never wanted a sled so much as he did the afternoon two days before Christmas, when he persuaded his father to take him out again to the coasting hill to see the boys coasting. There were all sorts of sleds: short sleds and long sleds, bob-sleds and flexible fliers. They held one, two, three, and sometimes even half a dozen boys and girls—for there were girls, too—all shouting and laughing as they went ...
— Tommy Trots Visit to Santa Claus • Thomas Nelson Page

... bolts. They resolved to leave means neither of ingress or egress to the sudden impulses of despair or of frenzy from within. The abbey was amply provisioned. With such precautions the courtiers might bid defiance to contagion. The external world could take care of itself. In the meantime it was folly to grieve, or to think. The prince had provided all the appliances of pleasure. There were buffoons, there were improvisatori, there were ballet-dancers, there were musicians, there was Beauty, there was wine. All these and security ...
— The Works of Edgar Allan Poe - Volume 2 (of 5) of the Raven Edition • Edgar Allan Poe

... moved to its depths, sometimes as of despair, sometimes as of resentment. Why, he asked himself, should God send—he put it this way—send to him this beautiful creature who filled his heart so completely, why hold her out to him as if inviting him to take her, and then suddenly snatch her away out of his life—out of ...
— Dorian • Nephi Anderson

... now that they were within the very chambers of O-Mai their nerves were pitched to the highest key—another turn and they would snap; for the people of Manator are filled with weird superstitions. As they entered the outer chamber they moved slowly, with drawn swords, no one seeming anxious to take the lead, and the twelve warriors hanging back in unconcealed and shameless terror, while the three chiefs, spurred on by fear of O-Tar and by pride, pressed together for mutual encouragement as they slowly crossed the ...
— The Chessmen of Mars • Edgar Rice Burroughs

... whom these indignities were reported by Dutocq, would gladly have served them up hot to la Peyrade; but the interview in which the copying clerk was to furnish information about Madame de Godollo did not take place at the time fixed. La Peyrade made his ...
— The Lesser Bourgeoisie • Honore de Balzac

... used by the Government Board, in which all transactions in the bonds and securities of the United States take place, is located on the second floor of the Exchange building. It is handsomely frescoed and furnished in green rep. The basement beneath this room is an immense vault, containing 618 safes, arranged in three tiers, and guarded by four ...
— Lights and Shadows of New York Life - or, the Sights and Sensations of the Great City • James D. McCabe

... strange and mystic, The very bushes swell And take wild shapes and motions, As if beneath a spell; They seem not the same lilacs ...
— The Complete Poetical Works of James Russell Lowell • James Lowell

... Wark, Walter Espec felt delighted with the novelty of the scene, and entered with enthusiasm upon his duties as an aspirant to the honours of chivalry. Besides learning to carve, to sing, and to take part in that exciting sport which has been described as 'the image of war'—such as hawking, and hunting the hare, the deer, the boar, and the wolf—he ere long signalised himself in the tiltyard by the facility which he displayed ...
— The Boy Crusaders - A Story of the Days of Louis IX. • John G. Edgar

... yet! When that comes, it will be under new conditions, if not unconditioned altogether. We'll take the world we have. So, my dear boy, just go and get me what I ...
— Donal Grant • George MacDonald

... 100 Mile Wireless Telephone Transmitting Set—With 110 Volt Alternating Current.—If you have a 110 volt [Footnote: Alternating current for lighting purposes ranges from 102.5 volts to 115 volts, so we take the median and call it 110 volts.] alternating current available you can use it for the initial source of energy for your wireless telephone transmitter. The chief difference between a wireless telephone transmitting set that uses an alternating current and one that uses a direct current ...
— The Radio Amateur's Hand Book • A. Frederick Collins

... think you'd like it, Gillyflower?" asked Magda. "It's a farm I've heard of in Devonshire, where they want to take paying-guests ...
— The Lamp of Fate • Margaret Pedler

... Persons led us to expect it would meet with many Obstructions. Never was a good Constitution more wanted than at this Juncture. Among other more lasting Advantages, I hope that in Consequence of it, the Part which that State must take in the War, will be conducted with greater Attention and better Effect. Who is to be the first Man, will be determind in September, when if our News papers rightly inform us, the new Government is to take Place. The Burden will fall on the Shoulders of one of ...
— The Original Writings of Samuel Adams, Volume 4 • Samuel Adams

... end of other people's noses? Let us live merrily. Life is all. That man has another future elsewhere, on high, below, anywhere, I don't believe; not one single word of it. Ah! sacrifice and renunciation are recommended to me; I must take heed to everything I do; I must cudgel my brains over good and evil, over the just and the unjust, over the fas and the nefas. Why? Because I shall have to render an account of my actions. When? After death. What a fine dream! After ...
— Les Miserables - Complete in Five Volumes • Victor Hugo

... Ned did use to curse his father, and at which the old man would laugh, were these, and such like: The Devil take you; The Devil fetch you: He would also wish him Plagues and Destructions many. Well, so it came to pass, through the righteous Judgement of God, that Neds Wishes and Curses were in a little time fuelled upon his Father; for not many months passed between them after this manner, but the ...
— The Life and Death of Mr. Badman • John Bunyan

... blameless citizen threatened with ruin and disgrace on account of one false step. Let them rather sympathize with him and his family in their misfortune. He had little more to tell. The Congressional inquiry would take place immediately, and in all probability a demand would be made upon the Senate for Judge Rossmore's impeachment. It was, he added, almost unnecessary for him to remind the Board that, in the event of impeachment, the adverse decision ...
— The Lion and The Mouse - A Story Of American Life • Charles Klein

... would not, by any further particulars, prevent the pleasure I should certainly take in viewing the grand academy, whither he was resolved I should go." He only desired me to observe a ruined building, upon the side of a mountain about three miles distant, of which he gave me this account: "That he had a very convenient ...
— Gulliver's Travels - into several remote nations of the world • Jonathan Swift

... Some people say that arrowroot does not pay so well, because it has to stay in the ground a whole year; but then if you have onions you can plant them over it, and so obtain a crop which will pay much better than the arrowroot itself. If you have a large piece of arrowroot ground, take up one half early, and plant it out with Irish potatoes; then take up the other half later, and with the plants set out your potato ground, that is if you have taken up your potatoes; if not, plant the arrowroot between the ...
— The Commercial Products of the Vegetable Kingdom • P. L. Simmonds

... my dear Dombey, for that proof of heart!' cried Cleopatra, squeezing his hand. 'But I am growing too serious! Take me downstairs, like an angel, and let us see what these people intend to give us for dinner. ...
— Dombey and Son • Charles Dickens

... was not a passing thing, for it lay, he says, somehow in an ocean everywhere, heaped up in gulfs and spaces. It was as though he could help himself and take it. That morning, had he so wished, could last forever; he could go backwards and taste the shadows of the night again, or forward and bask in the glory of hot noon. There were no parts of things, and so no restlessness, no sense ...
— The Centaur • Algernon Blackwood

... of Isis. Sir W. Hamilton (in his account of Pompeii communicated to the Society of Antiquaries), when speaking of this house, having taken occasion to give a general idea of the private mansions of the ancient citizens, I shall take the liberty of transcribing the whole passage. "A covered cloister, supported by columns, goes round the house, as was customary in many of the houses at Pompeii. The rooms in general are very small, and in one, where an iron bedstead was found, the wall had been pared away to make room for ...
— Dreams, Waking Thoughts, and Incidents • William Beckford

... Mlle. Armande, for she would not survive the dishonor of the house for a week? Do you wish to be the death of poor Chesnel, your old notary? For I shall kill the Count in prison before they shall bring the charge against him, and take my own life afterwards, before they shall try me for ...
— The Jealousies of a Country Town • Honore de Balzac

... my house when you do take the prop That doth sustain my house; you take my life When you do take the means whereby I live. Merchant of Venice, Act iv. Sc. ...
— The World's Best Poetry — Volume 10 • Various

... time he had quickly made up his mind what he should do in that event. There was more than one loan secured by American Navigation 4s. He loosened a couple in one of the other piles. If the first broker came in he would take two bonds from one of these. But the broker did ...
— True Stories of Crime From the District Attorney's Office • Arthur Train

... victory. There may be some among them who fought and are fighting because they despise Britons and British rule, but the vast majority are on commando because they firmly believe that Great Britain is attempting to take their country and their government from them by the process of theft which we enlightened Anglo-Saxons of America and England are wont to style "benevolent assimilation." They feel that they have the right to govern their country in accordance with ...
— With the Boer Forces • Howard C. Hillegas

... long and as often as he can, and resigns himself toit as he might resign himself to being shaved by a paralytic. Nowhere else in the world have women more leisure and freedom to improve their minds, and nowhere else do they show a higher level of intelligence, or take part more effectively in affairs of the first importance. But nowhere else is there worse cooking in the home, or a more inept handling of the whole domestic economy, or a larger dependence upon the aid of external substitutes, ...
— In Defense of Women • H. L. Mencken

... interrupted a cheerful voice; and I glanced up, to see a sandy-haired youth with an extremely good-natured face nodding at us across the coping of the party-wall. "Avast there! Busy with visitors, eh? No? Well, I've been thinkin' it over, and I'll take sixpence ...
— Poison Island • Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch (Q)

... take my advice; and perhaps he wouldn't, but, if he should, I'm sure he would make a much more cheerful picture ...
— The Nursery, February 1873, Vol. XIII. - A Monthly Magazine for Youngest People • Various

... down at the saeter, for he was tired. We were out early to-day, and tomorrow we are to take home a pair of nags to Hoegseth Farm. He sent you his greeting and ...
— Lisbeth Longfrock • Hans Aanrud

... great galleon and an English man-of-war: Master Jonson, like the former, was built far higher in learning; solid, but slow in his performances; Shakespere, with the English man-of-war, lesser in bulk, but lighter in sailing, could turn with all tides, tack about and take advantage of all winds, by the quickness of his ...
— A History of English Literature • Robert Huntington Fletcher

... profession with belief, but belief with truth itself. For it is in the innermost sanctuary of the spirit, into which no human eye can penetrate, and where truth, as a holy messenger sent from God, presents herself, seeking for admission to dwell there, and take possession of the soul's temple for ever,—it is there that the reality of a man's truthfulness, sincerity, and honesty must be tried and decided upon by the all-seeing Judge, who can alone search the heart. How do we deal there with what claims to be truth? With what spirit do ...
— Parish Papers • Norman Macleod

... been, and its battles and hurry and hopes and fears but mere shows, and the unspoken words of a dream. He went straight up to her and sat down by her side and put his arm about her shoulders, and strove to take her hand to caress it; but she moved but little, and it was as if she heeded him not. And the Hall-Sun stood before them and looked at them for a little while; and then she fell to speech; but at the first sound of her voice, it seemed that ...
— The House of the Wolfings - A Tale of the House of the Wolfings and All the Kindreds of the Mark Written in Prose and in Verse • William Morris

... lives every one is curious to know the particulars. Great battles have been fought, and important sieges maintained, of which the details are as yet preserved only in the newspapers, or in the transient publications of the day, but which ought now to take their place in permanent ...
— The Electoral Votes of 1876 - Who Should Count Them, What Should Be Counted, and the Remedy for a Wrong Count • David Dudley Field

... bullied, and could be bullied, by the machines they worked with into being machines themselves. No one would think of denying that men who let machines get the better of them, either in their minds or their bodies, in any walk of life, grow unspiritual and mechanical. But it does not take a machine to make a machine out of a man. Anything will do it if the man will let it. Even the farmer who is out under the great free dome of heaven, and working in wonder every day of his life, grows like a clod if he buries his soul alive in the soil. But ...
— Crowds - A Moving-Picture of Democracy • Gerald Stanley Lee

... Never better, nor more true. Here be grapes, whose lusty blood Is the learned poet's good; Sweeter yet did never crown The head of Bacchus: nuts more brown Than the squirrels' teeth that crack them; Deign, O fairest fair, to take them. For these, black-eyed Driope Hath oftentimes commanded me With my clasped knee to climb. See how well the lusty time Hath decked their rising cheeks in red, Such as on your lips is spread. ...
— Library Of The World's Best Literature, Ancient And Modern, Vol 4 • Charles Dudley Warner

... to sit still, the need of separation would be much less than it is, for the boys could be sent to the gymnasium while the girls remained in the school room. But systematic exercise is even more necessary for the latter than for the former, because they are likely to take it spontaneously. These exercises must differ in kind and in intensity from those performed by boys, and for this and other reasons, are ...
— The Education of American Girls • Anna Callender Brackett

... and fragments of the race which had hung upon the skirts of civilization, and disputed the advance of the white man for two centuries. It was not until some years later than this that railroads began {405} to take an important share in opening up ...
— Brief History of English and American Literature • Henry A. Beers

... unsightly and worthless as those Their great sprawling leaves thus presume To mix with the pink, the jonquil, and the rose, And take up a ...
— Books for Children - The Works of Charles and Mary Lamb, Vol. 3 • Charles and Mary Lamb

... the loom, spinning yarn dyed with purple of the sea, and her father she met as he was going to the council with the chiefs of the land. Then she said: "Give me, father, the wagon with the mules, that I may take the garments to the river to wash them. Thou shouldest always have clean robes when thou goest to the council; and there are my five brothers also, who love to have newly washed garments ...
— The Story Of The Odyssey • The Rev. Alfred J. Church

... the by, I will let you into a secret: know that I am somewhat a lover of the marvellous, and like to indulge a little embellishing exaggeration in any place where there is no chance of finding me out. Mind, therefore, my dear Mr. Linden, that you take no ungenerous advantage of this confession; but suffer me, now and then, to tell my stories my own way, even when you think truth would require me to tell ...
— The Disowned, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... whose deaths have given rise to this occasion were first brought together, and called upon to unite their industry and their ability in the service of the country, let us now turn to the other of these distinguished men, and take a brief notice of his life up to the period when he appeared within the walls ...
— The Great Speeches and Orations of Daniel Webster • Daniel Webster

... "Do you take her money—such money?" Abner asked of Giles with severity. Eudoxia had returned to ...
— Under the Skylights • Henry Blake Fuller

... which the intended, or at least the probable, victims suffer no permanent harm whatever. The Dictator suddenly found his senses deserting him with the crash of the explosion. He knew in a moment what it was, and he knew also that for a certain moment or two his senses would utterly fail to take account of it. For one fearful second he knew he was going to be insensible, just as a passenger at sea knows he is going to be sick. Then it was all over with him and quiet, ...
— The Dictator • Justin McCarthy

... the combination ingenious; but he has no longer a son, he would show me his empty hands, and, since I am in need of some money for my trip to la Joya, I prefer you, you who have it all, to him who has nothing. I am a little fatigued, permit me to take a chair." ...
— Les Miserables - Complete in Five Volumes • Victor Hugo

... with solicitude when she thought of possible injury to Troy. The least spark would kindle the farmer's swift feelings of rage and jealousy; he would lose his self-mastery as he had this evening; Troy's blitheness might become aggressive; it might take the direction of derision, and Boldwood's anger might then take the ...
— Far from the Madding Crowd • Thomas Hardy

... It is still in my possession, and I look on it with veneration as my principal tutor, for it had certainly a large share in the elements of my education. If, which does not seem likely, another reform lunacy should arise in my time, I shall take care to close my shutters against "The power of ...
— Gryll Grange • Thomas Love Peacock

... such an address would be immediately moved in both Houses and supported by the whole strength of the Whig party. This intelligence satisfied him that it was time to take a decisive step. He would not discard the Whigs but he would give them a lesson of which they stood much in need. He would break the chain in which they imagined that they had him fast. He would not ...
— The History of England from the Accession of James II. - Volume 3 (of 5) • Thomas Babington Macaulay

... of Judges we read that Israel was delivered into the hands of the Canaanites, and was sorely oppressed for twenty years. The prophetess Deborah sent for Barak, and instructed him with a message from God to the end that he should take "ten thousand men of the children of Naphtali and of the children of Zebulun" unto Mount Tabor. This he did, and Sisera assembled his nine hundred chariots "from Harosheth of the Gentiles unto the river Kishon. So Barak ...
— A Trip Abroad • Don Carlos Janes

... as plainly as could any spoken words. But by no word or hint did Mrs. Arnot reveal to him her knowledge. Her tones might have been gentler and her eyes kinder; that was all. In her heart, however, she almost revered the man who had the strength and patience to take up this heavy and hopeless burden, and go on in the path of duty without a word. How different was his present course from his former passionate clamor for what was then equally beyond his reach? She was almost ...
— A Knight Of The Nineteenth Century • E. P. Roe

... not keep anything I used to love when I was little. The old books went; and Tom is different, and my father. It is like death. I must part with everything I cared for when I was a child. And I must part with you; we must never take any notice of each other again. That was what I wanted to speak to you for. I wanted to let you know that Tom and I can't do as we like about such things, and that if I behave as if I had forgotten all about you, it is not out of envy ...
— The Mill on the Floss • George Eliot

... answer; Cromwell in the Commons spoke in its favour with a vehemence which excited suspicion; and, though it was ultimately voted[d] equivalent to a refusal, a grand committee was appointed[e] "to take the whole matter respecting the king into consideration." It had been calculated that this attempt to amalgamate the plan of the parliament with that of the army might be accomplished in the ...
— The History of England from the First Invasion by the Romans - to the Accession of King George the Fifth - Volume 8 • John Lingard and Hilaire Belloc

... originally existed as a mineral salt, when and how did it take metallic form? Doubtless, just in the same manner as we now (by means of well-known reagents which are common in nature) precipitate it in the laboratory. With regard to that found in quartz lodes finely disseminated through the gangue, the change was ...
— Getting Gold • J. C. F. Johnson

... fifty pounds, most exquisitely wrought, and such a beautiful example of the best that Russians can do in this respect that I went in and asked the price of it. The price being named, I said that I would take it. Thereupon consternation was evident in the establishment, and presently the head of the concern said to me that they were not sure that they wished to sell it. But I said, "You HAVE sold it; I ...
— Autobiography of Andrew Dickson White Volume II • Andrew Dickson White

... Serbia, and it would have been so easy to win her over. An equitable treaty of commerce, the concession of a port on the Adriatic, and Serbia would have become the ally of Austria. Serbia was prepared to forget the shameful policy hitherto pursued by Austria. All that was required was some give-and-take, some fairness. ...
— German Problems and Personalities • Charles Sarolea

... and I don't see how folks make you out so ungodly, if livin' true, and bein' kind to the poor is unrighteousness, then give me the sinners to dwell among. Think of all the things yer pa has given me, all my life, and there's old Deacon Sims won't take one cent off of his wood he sells me, when the Lord has told him in the good book to be kind to the widow and fatherless. He makes long prayers 'nough, though. Well, I s'pose he has ter kinder reach out to heaven that way, and make up in words what ...
— Dawn • Mrs. Harriet A. Adams

... assembled. Mrs Fred watched her advent with apprehensive eyes. Thinking it over after her first triumph, it occurred to Mrs Fred that the loss of Nettie would make a serious difference to her own comfort. Who was to take charge of the children, and conduct those vulgar affairs for which Susan's feelings disqualified her? She did her best to decipher the pale face which appeared over the breakfast cups and saucers opposite. What did ...
— The Doctor's Family • Mrs. (Margaret) Oliphant

... advertisement, and communicate privately as requested, and hear news of her, and come speeding in a Rolls-Royce to the Cafe des Exiles, and walk in and humble Papa Dupont with a look of hauteur and confound Mama Therese with a peremptory word, and take Sofia by the hand and lead her out and induct her into such an environment as suited her rightful station: said environment necessarily comprising a town house if not on Park Lane at least nearly adjacent to it, and a country house ...
— Red Masquerade • Louis Joseph Vance

... and two brown eyes that were always laughing; and around her head were two thick braids of brown hair, that always looked smooth and neat, for Stineli was a very orderly girl, and knew very well how to take care of herself. For that her daily experience was excellent. It is true Stineli was scarcely nine years old, but she was the eldest daughter of the family, and had to help her mother in every ...
— Rico And Wiseli - Rico And Stineli, And How Wiseli Was Provided For • Johanna Spyri

... outside of Italy, in England, in France, and Germany. A generation that in England read Vathek and Mrs. Radcliffe, supped on the horrors of Melmoth and Frankenstein, knew E.T.W. Hoffmann and the German romantic literature, could be relied on to take up Piranesi, and for his lesser artistic side. Poe knew his work and Baudelaire; we see that for De Quincey he was a kindred spirit. The English mezzotinter John Martin must have studied ...
— Promenades of an Impressionist • James Huneker

... with you!" snapped the royal cat. "I'm glad you are turned out of the house. Let us hope a body can take a nap in comfort now, without having her tail stepped on or ...
— Prince Vance - The Story of a Prince with a Court in His Box • Eleanor Putnam

... "Take it the other way around, Miss Ruth," returned her friend, with a quizzical smile. "We should be very glad that you did meet Wonota. Considering what that mad bull would have done to you if she had not swerved him by a rifle shot, ...
— Ruth Fielding in the Great Northwest - Or, The Indian Girl Star of the Movies • Alice B. Emerson

... Professor Aronnax on a hunting trip that will take place tomorrow morning in his Crespo Island forests. He hopes nothing will prevent the professor from attending, and he looks forward with pleasure to the professor's ...
— 20000 Leagues Under the Seas • Jules Verne



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