Dictonary.netDictonary.net
Synonyms, antonyms, pronunciation

  Home
English Dictionary      examples: 'day', 'get rid of', 'New York Bay'




Strike   Listen
verb
Strike  v. t.  (past & past part. struck; pres. part. striking)  
1.
To touch or hit with some force, either with the hand or with an instrument; to smite; to give a blow to, either with the hand or with any instrument or missile. "He at Philippi kept His sword e'en like a dancer; while I struck The lean and wrinkled Cassius."
2.
To come in collision with; to strike against; as, a bullet struck him; the wave struck the boat amidships; the ship struck a reef.
3.
To give, as a blow; to impel, as with a blow; to give a force to; to dash; to cast. "They shall take of the blood, and strike it on the two sideposts." "Who would be free, themselves must strike the blow."
4.
To stamp or impress with a stroke; to coin; as, to strike coin from metal: to strike dollars at the mint.
5.
To thrust in; to cause to enter or penetrate; to set in the earth; as, a tree strikes its roots deep.
6.
To punish; to afflict; to smite. "To punish the just is not good, nor strike princes for equity."
7.
To cause to sound by one or more beats; to indicate or notify by audible strokes; as, the clock strikes twelve; the drums strike up a march.
8.
To lower; to let or take down; to remove; as, to strike sail; to strike a flag or an ensign, as in token of surrender; to strike a yard or a topmast in a gale; to strike a tent; to strike the centering of an arch.
9.
To make a sudden impression upon, as by a blow; to affect sensibly with some strong emotion; as, to strike the mind, with surprise; to strike one with wonder, alarm, dread, or horror. "Nice works of art strike and surprise us most on the first view." "They please as beauties, here as wonders strike."
10.
To affect in some particular manner by a sudden impression or impulse; as, the plan proposed strikes me favorably; to strike one dead or blind. "How often has stricken you dumb with his irony!"
11.
To cause or produce by a stroke, or suddenly, as by a stroke; as, to strike a light. "Waving wide her myrtle wand, She strikes a universal peace through sea and land."
12.
To cause to ignite; as, to strike a match.
13.
To make and ratify; as, to strike a bargain. Note: Probably borrowed from the L. foedus ferrire, to strike a compact, so called because an animal was struck and killed as a sacrifice on such occasions.
14.
To take forcibly or fraudulently; as, to strike money. (Old Slang)
15.
To level, as a measure of grain, salt, or the like, by scraping off with a straight instrument what is above the level of the top.
16.
(Masonry) To cut off, as a mortar joint, even with the face of the wall, or inward at a slight angle.
17.
To hit upon, or light upon, suddenly; as, my eye struck a strange word; they soon struck the trail.
18.
To borrow money of; to make a demand upon; as, he struck a friend for five dollars. (Slang)
19.
To lade into a cooler, as a liquor.
20.
To stroke or pass lightly; to wave. "Behold, I thought, He will... strike his hand over the place, and recover the leper."
21.
To advance; to cause to go forward; used only in past participle. "Well struck in years."
To strike an attitude, To strike a balance. See under Attitude, and Balance.
To strike a jury (Law), to constitute a special jury ordered by a court, by each party striking out a certain number of names from a prepared list of jurors, so as to reduce it to the number of persons required by law.
To strike a lead.
(a)
(Mining) To find a vein of ore.
(b)
Fig.: To find a way to fortune. (Colloq.)
To strike a ledger or To strike an account, to balance it.
To strike hands with.
(a)
To shake hands with.
(b)
To make a compact or agreement with; to agree with.
To strike off.
(a)
To erase from an account; to deduct; as, to strike off the interest of a debt.
(b)
(Print.) To impress; to print; as, to strike off a thousand copies of a book.
(c)
To separate by a blow or any sudden action; as, to strike off what is superfluous or corrupt.
To strike oil, to find petroleum when boring for it; figuratively, to make a lucky hit financially. (Slang, U.S.)
To strike one luck, to shake hands with one and wish good luck. (Obs.)
To strike out.
(a)
To produce by collision; to force out, as, to strike out sparks with steel.
(b)
To blot out; to efface; to erase. "To methodize is as necessary as to strike out."
(c)
To form by a quick effort; to devise; to invent; to contrive, as, to strike out a new plan of finance.
(d)
(Baseball) To cause a player to strike out; said of the pitcher. See To strike out, under Strike, v. i.
To strike sail. See under Sail.
To strike up.
(a)
To cause to sound; to begin to beat. "Strike up the drums."
(b)
To begin to sing or play; as, to strike up a tune.
(c)
To raise (as sheet metal), in making diahes, pans, etc., by blows or pressure in a die.
To strike work, to quit work; to go on a strike.






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








Advanced search
     Find words:
Starting with
Ending with
Containing
Matching a pattern  

Synonyms
Antonyms
Quotes
Words linked to  

only single words



Share |





"Strike" Quotes from Famous Books



... flows rather from a natural disposition to oblige, than from any rules on that subject, and therefore never fails to strike those who understand good breeding and those who ...
— Character • Samuel Smiles

... absolution for crime and smoothed a pathway to heaven Put all those to the torture out of whom anything can be got Questioning nothing, doubting nothing, fearing nothing Quite mistaken: in supposing himself the Emperor's child Rashness alternating with hesitation Readiness to strike and bleed at any moment in her cause Rearing gorgeous temples where paupers are to kneel Rebuked the bigotry which had already grown Reformer who becomes in his turn a bigot is doubly odious Reformers ...
— The Rise of the Dutch Republic, 1555-1566 • John Lothrop Motley

... for the thought seemed to strike them simultaneously, they conferred together about giving a great entertainment in their grandest rooms to any of their neighbours who chose to come, or indeed to any inhabitants of the earth or air who would visit them. ...
— The Portent & Other Stories • George MacDonald

... to be assumed by Massachusetts, now by South Carolina, and how and by what State it will next be exercised, or what vital power it may next strike from the Constitution, it is impossible to predict; but, if permitted in one State, it will be exercised by all, till not a vestige remains of the Constitution of the Union. Suppose the Tariff repealed by Congress, nullification ...
— The Continental Monthly, Vol. 3 No 2, February 1863 - Devoted To Literature And National Policy • Various

... peculiar motion of his hand as he threw back his hair. In that moment it flashed across me that Thorn must be Captain Levison; the description was exact. Many and many a time since have I wondered that the thought did not strike ...
— East Lynne • Mrs. Henry Wood

... of it," she said. "But worst of all, and the thing that makes me lose faith in myself—" Just then the tower clock began to strike and Effi counted the strokes. "Ten—Tomorrow at this time I shall be in Berlin. We shall speak about our wedding anniversary and he will say pleasing and friendly things to me and perhaps words of affection. I shall sit there and listen and have a sense ...
— The German Classics Of The Nineteenth And Twentieth Centuries, Volume 12 • Various

... strike the honest magistrate, to use the vulgar phrase, "all of a heap," and instead of answering, he returned the question—"Whae's Mr. Robert Campbell?—ahem! ahay! Whae's ...
— Rob Roy, Complete, Illustrated • Sir Walter Scott

... Curse him! Curse him! I wish I'd blown out his brains!" He threw his arms about wildly and she wondered if he would strike her. But he threw himself into a chair and burst into heavy sobbing. Madeleine ...
— Sleeping Fires • Gertrude Atherton

... will, that we will;' they all cried out together, and thinks I to myself, 'and so will I as long as I've an arm to strike with, or a head ...
— The Three Lieutenants • W.H.G. Kingston

... of 1843 was forcibly recalled to the memory of Mr. Janisch, Governor of St. Helena; and the resemblance proved not merely superficial. But the comet of 1880 was less brilliant, and even more evanescent. After only eight days of visibility, it had faded so much as no longer to strike, though still discoverable by the unaided eye; and on February 20 it was invisible with the great Cordoba equatoreal ...
— A Popular History of Astronomy During the Nineteenth Century - Fourth Edition • Agnes M. (Agnes Mary) Clerke

... you any aspirations, or are you content simply to eat and drink? You have a good time of it now, but what if you were kicked and cuffed and starved? You are sensitive, for I saw you shrink and shiver when Bill Wright,—the scoundrel!—dared to strike you. He'll never do it again, Prim! Have you the taste of an epicure for the juicy grass blades and the clover when it is young,—do you love to hear the birds sing and the brook murmur, and do you enjoy living under the trees and watching the clouds ...
— A Beautiful Possibility • Edith Ferguson Black

... learned at the last minute that in some mysterious manner word had reached the rangers, who were hastening to the assistance of the King's men. There was, accordingly, no time to lose. They must strike at once, and then vanish into the depths ...
— The King's Arrow - A Tale of the United Empire Loyalists • H. A. Cody

... christened the Fortune, and on this the mine was to be exploded by a slow match, cut so as to explode at a calculated moment. The mine on board the Hope was to be started by a piece of clockwork, which at the appointed time was to strike fire from a flint. Planks and woodwork were piled on the decks to give to the two vessels the appearance of simple fireships. Thirty-two small craft, saturated with tar and turpentine and filled with inflammable materials, were to be sent down the river in detachments of ...
— By Pike and Dyke: A Tale of the Rise of the Dutch Republic • G.A. Henty

... different thing of it altogether. Of course on the actual night the match may refuse to strike, and Lord John may have to go on saying "a man who—a man who—a man who" until the ignition occurs, but even so it will still seem delightfully natural to the audience (as if he were making up the epigram as he went ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 146, June 17, 1914 • Various

... had helped him to escape. If there was really anything of value in the suit-case, as Whittlesey had said, the law might have it and welcome; and she was already wondering just how to dispose of it. If Charles followed her instructions, he would strike across country and catch the northbound evening train. His fate was out of her hands, and it was wholly unlikely that he would make any further effort to regain his property now that Phil had seen it. She doubted whether he had had any real errand ...
— Otherwise Phyllis • Meredith Nicholson

... that they have been deceived and you endeavor to lead their attention to the testimonies of Holy Scripture in order to obtain from it reliable testimonies, immediately their anger begins to rise, their countenance becomes disfigured, and, alas, with some already a fist is clenching with which they strike the table or their knees and declare defiantly: 'I don't care anything for what you say; it is none of your business; I know that I am born of God, and will suffer it to be taken away from me by nobody, by no learned man, ...
— American Lutheranism - Volume 1: Early History of American Lutheranism and The Tennessee Synod • Friedrich Bente

... more particular expression attempted, of certain objects, by means of resembling sounds."—Blair's Rhet., p. 129; Jamieson's, 130; Murray's Gram., 331. "The right disposition of the shade, makes the light and colouring strike the more."—Blair's Rhet., 144. "I observed that a diffuse style inclines most to long periods."—Ib., p. 178. "Their poor Arguments, which they only Pickt up and down the Highway "—Divine Right of Tythes, p. iii. "Which must be little, ...
— The Grammar of English Grammars • Goold Brown

... as well as his self-confidence, developed rapidly under the responsibilities of his new position. During his term of service in the House he was zealous in the performance of his duties, alert to seize every opportunity to strike a blow for his party and acquit himself to the satisfaction of his constituents. In January, 1848, he made a telling speech in support of the "Spot Resolutions," in which his antagonism to the course of the Administration in regard ...
— The Every-day Life of Abraham Lincoln • Francis Fisher Browne

... It did strike Fisher minor as queer that any one should pack shillings up in a trunk, but he was too pleased to oblige this important and fashionable-looking personage to raise ...
— The Cock-House at Fellsgarth • Talbot Baines Reed

... impression the newcomer gets of San Francisco is that here is a permanent city—a city that has found itself, has achieved its own personality, and is satisfied with it. Perhaps, because they are growing so fast, certain of the other Coast cities strike the casual observer as having just been put up. I was told that a man who lives on a residential street of San Diego has to mark his house with chalk when he leaves of a morning in order to know it when he gets home at night. A real-estate agent told me so, and I do not think a Southern California ...
— Roughing it De Luxe • Irvin S. Cobb

... of the boat. In my eagerness I made a deep gash on the gunwale: this taught me to be more cautious in future. Fortunately the axe was a good one, or I should have broken it. I had made some impression on one of the links of the chain; my object was to strike ...
— Twice Lost • W.H.G. Kingston

... perceived the object on which the general attention was fixed—the swooning body of a man, heavily bound in chains and lying at the foot of the throne. Beside him stood a tall black slave, clad in vivid scarlet and masked,—this sinister-looking creature held a gleaming dagger uplifted ready to strike,—and as I saw this, a wild yearning arose in me to save the threatened life of the bound and helpless victim. If I could only rush to defend and drag him away from impending peril, I thought!—but ...
— The Life Everlasting: A Reality of Romance • Marie Corelli

... had left his tinder box behind him in the cave, she heard the strike of flint on steel. La Touche was lighting his pipe. She waited ten minutes or more, then she came to the ...
— The Beach of Dreams • H. De Vere Stacpoole

... what he did," said Johnson, puzzled. "Packed some of his things and said he'd be gone a week or so. He must have got off at Attica,—but, no, he couldn't have got here this soon by road. By glory, I hope the boat didn't strike a snag or a rock, or run ashore somewhere. Looks kind ...
— Viola Gwyn • George Barr McCutcheon

... 'gainst that season comes Wherein our Saviour's birth is celebrated The bird of dawning singeth all night long, And then, they say, no spirit dare stir abroad, The nights are wholesome, then no planets strike, So hallowed and so ...
— The Evidence in the Case • James M. Beck

... ago. You people in New York don't know what progress means. Why, out there in Bonanza City we do things while you're thinking about doing them. But to come back to Barney—that was his name, Barney McGoldrick—after I made my pile out of Bonanza, I used to strike here once in a while to see how he was getting along, and when he died I took these rooms just as he left 'em. There wasn't a chick or a child to come after him, but he had a string of pensioners as long as the C.A. ...
— Life and Gabriella - The Story of a Woman's Courage • Ellen Glasgow

... have been left about the image, draw a wain with four wheels, which bears the shrine and the image that is within the shrine, and the other priests standing in the gateway try to prevent it from entering, and the men who are under a vow come to the assistance of the god and strike them, while the others defend themselves. 63 Then there comes to be a hard fight with staves, and they break one another's heads, and I am of opinion that many even die of the wounds they receive; ...
— The History Of Herodotus - Volume 1(of 2) • Herodotus

... notoriously is with the leaves on plants nailed against a wall, or grown in front of a window. A moderate amount of light suffices to induce such movements; all that is necessary is that the light should steadily strike the plants in an oblique direction. With respect to the above twisting movement of cotyledons, Frank has given many and much more striking instances in the case of the leaves on [page 440] branches which had been fastened in various positions ...
— The Power of Movement in Plants • Charles Darwin

... up the stairs). Thou fool, may God's damnation strike thee dead, Thou and Lord Tristram for the night that's passed! I'll bring thy words into the Queen that she May have thee slain ...
— The German Classics, v. 20 - Masterpieces of German Literature • Various

... must part with such a heavy strain; or if they do not, we shall drag our anchors till we strike on ...
— Percival Keene • Frederick Marryat

... wind they make Grassless Land, go ashore, find a huge, rocky cavern, strike a flint to kindle a fire at the entrance as a safeguard against demons, and a torch to light them ...
— The Danish History, Books I-IX • Saxo Grammaticus ("Saxo the Learned")

... beating it at last! Only another hill like this and their work would be done. They would strike the lake and water. Water! God in Heaven! Water! A whole big lake of it! To throw themselves into it! To sink into its cool, sweet depth! And to ...
— The Shepherd of the North • Richard Aumerle Maher

... persons who pursue any of these callings; no semblance of aught honest or honourable. In all there are twelve of them; among them not a face but speaks of the Penitentiary—not one which does not brighten up, and show more cheerful, as the hooves of their horses strike the Texan ...
— The Death Shot - A Story Retold • Mayne Reid

... capacity of Mr. DOUGHERTY for Soaring which caused him to be called upon by the Army of the Potomac for a speech. The great D. begins by declaring that he would rather speak for his country than for Pennsylvania, which, considering that he also declared that he came "as a modest spectator," does not strike us as the depth of humility. However, "my bosom," said Mr. D., "is not confined to any locality;" and we believe that Mr. PECKSNIFF said something like this of his own frontal linen. Yet, we should like to know what Mr. DOUGHERTY does for a chest when his ...
— Punchinello, Vol. 1, No. 6, May 7, 1870 • Various

... Strike dead old men and women! Dash the children's brains out against the stone wall! Violate young girls! Mutilate their fair bodies so that they will be unseemly when they are found by the husband or father. Burn, steal, kill—but remember that your Kaiser and the War Staff ...
— The Blot on the Kaiser's 'Scutcheon • Newell Dwight Hillis

... moonlight showed the way, shining in through the fanlights, and Rollo pushed open the door of the library and brought his charge in there. The next thing was to strike a match and light two candles. The room looked very peaceful, just as it had been deserted by the family a few hours before; Rosy's work basket with the work overflowing it, the books and papers on the table where ...
— Wych Hazel • Susan and Anna Warner

... hop-pickers' riot is as simple as the facts of it are new and naive in strike histories. Twenty-eight hundred pickers were camped on a treeless hill which was part of the —— ranch, the largest single employer of agricultural labor in the state. Some were in tents, some in topless squares of sacking, ...
— An American Idyll - The Life of Carleton H. Parker • Cornelia Stratton Parker

... inside the grove of trees. The proposition was most acceptable, and they took up their position, the pond in view, peeping out, and conversing in a whisper. By and by they heard the church clock strike eight. ...
— Verner's Pride • Mrs. Henry Wood

... years has been gradually losing territory, now comprises a narrow strip of land between the Adriatic (W.) and the Black Sea (E.), about twice the size of England; is traversed by the Dinaric Alps and Pindus Mountains, which strike southwards into Greece, while offshoots from the BALKANS (q. v.) diversify the E.; climate is very variable, and is marked by high winds and extremes of cold and heat; the soil is remarkably fertile and well adapted for the cultivation of cereals, but agricultural enterprise is hampered by ...
— The Nuttall Encyclopaedia - Being a Concise and Comprehensive Dictionary of General Knowledge • Edited by Rev. James Wood

... stand convicted on the most conclusive evidence of a crime of inexpressible atrocity—a crime that defiles the sacred springs of domestic confidence, and is calculated to strike alarm into the breast of every Englishman who invests largely in the choicer vintages of Southern Europe. Like the serpent of old, you have stung the hand of your protector. Fortunate in having ...
— Law and Laughter • George Alexander Morton

... rise. "Who is your captain?" the Duke of Norfolk asked the crowd. "His name is Poverty," was the answer, "for he and his cousin Necessity have brought us to this doing." There was in fact a general strike of the employers. Clothmakers discharged their workers, farmers put away their servants. "They say the King asketh so much that they be not able to do as they have done before this time." Such a peasant insurrection as was raging in Germany was only prevented ...
— History of the English People, Volume III (of 8) - The Parliament, 1399-1461; The Monarchy 1461-1540 • John Richard Green

... have its side HH more deadned by the resistance of the dark or quiet medium PPP, Whence there will be a kind of deadness superinduc'd on the side HHH, which will continually increase from B, and strike deeper and deeper into the Ray by the line BR; Whence all the parts of the triangle, RBHO will be of a dead Blue colour, and so much the deeper, by how much the nearer they lie to the line BHH, which is most deaded or impeded, ...
— Micrographia • Robert Hooke

... religion! They are so mixed up that we do not know how to unmix them. His Caste to the potter meant his trade, the trade of his clan for generations; it meant all the observances bound up with it; it meant, in short, his life. It would never strike him that he could be a Christian and a potter at the same time, and very probably he could not; the feeling of the Caste would be against it. Then what else could he be? He does not argue all this out; he does not care enough about the matter to take the trouble to think at all. ...
— Things as They Are - Mission Work in Southern India • Amy Wilson-Carmichael

... every person gets out of the way of the prince or eunuch. Even if a man is at his door, he goes in, and keeps his door shut till the great personage has gone by. Thus, not a soul is in the way, and this is enjoined that they may strike a dread into the people, and be held in veneration; and the people are not allowed to see them often, lest they should grow so familiar as to speak to them.. All these officers wear very magnificent dresses of silk, so fine that none such is brought ...
— A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Vol. 1 • Robert Kerr

... bossin' a little ranch up in Idaho next June when I heard tell of a big strike in the Esmeralda range—not such a great distance from where I had spent the week with Slocum. The report had it that a feller named Slocum had located the big ace of gold mines, an' I was some et up with curiosity to see if it was the same Slocum; but I was needed ...
— Happy Hawkins • Robert Alexander Wason

... feeding always travel against the wind; and he expected therefore to find them somewhere in the direction from which it was blowing. Following a course, which angled with that of the wind, they kept on, expecting soon to strike the trail of ...
— Popular Adventure Tales • Mayne Reid

... he must strike a daring blow while his troops had any hope or vitality left; and so on Christmas night, after crossing the Delaware as shown elsewhere, he fell on the Hessians at Trenton in the midst of their festivities, captured one thousand prisoners, and slew ...
— Comic History of the United States • Bill Nye

... I could take. Hal is not able to leave, and mother would merely be bored to tears, and Flip Denton is at Monte Carlo. There is no one really but you and Hal and Flip who would fit in with my spring mood. Any one else would strike ...
— Winding Paths • Gertrude Page

... uplifts its column'd stem Bright with the broad rose-blossoms. I have seen Many a fallen convent reverend in decay, And many a time have trod the castle courts And grass-green halls, yet never did they strike Home to the heart such melancholy thoughts As this poor cottage. Look, its little hatch Fleeced with that grey and wintry moss; the roof Part mouldered in, the rest o'ergrown with weeds, House-leek and long thin grass and ...
— Poems, 1799 • Robert Southey

... Strike with hand of fire, on, weird musician, thy harp, strung with Apollo's golden hair! Fill the vast cathedral aisles with symphonies sweet and dim, deft toucher of the organ's keys; blow, bugler, blow until thy silver notes do touch and kiss the moonlit waves, and charm the ...
— Lectures of Col. R. G. Ingersoll, Volume I • Robert Green Ingersoll

... whore a closer Cabinet. Confest! upon what safety, thou trembling aspyn, Upon what hope? Is there ought left to buoy us But our owne confidence? What frends now follow us, That have the powre to strike of theis misfortunes, But our owne constant harts? Where were my eies, My understanding, when I tooke unto me A fellow of thy falce hart for a frend? Thy melting mind! foold with a few faire words Suffer those secreats that concerne thy life, In the Revealer ...
— A Collection of Old English Plays, Vol. II • Various

... so that at the end of the war I may perhaps achieve fame as the author of "Drivellings of a young Officer at the Front." As I have not got used to the routine out here I will describe all the last few days as they strike me, because probably, when I have been out here a little, everything will become such a matter of course that it will be difficult to give you any idea of what our life is like unless I begin ...
— Letters from France • Isaac Alexander Mack

... associated with the old monsters of the Lias. Luidag—for so the goblin is called—has but one leg, terminating, like an ancient satyr's, in a cloven foot; but it is furnished with two arms, bearing hard fists at the end of them, with which it has been known to strike the benighted traveller in the face, or to tumble him over into some dark pool. The spectre may be seen at the close of evening hopping vigorously among the distant bogs, like a felt ball on its electric platform; and when the mist lies thick in the hollows, an occasional glimpse may be caught of ...
— The Cruise of the Betsey • Hugh Miller

... to ride this tide eastward, than they did in former times. Here then we have one fact of water tide more comprehensive, at least, than the tractive theory of the moon. We have also the fact of two great promontories in Capes Horn and Good Hope, where this great tidal wave must strike against, and they produce constant oscillations of the water to and fro, and produce gurgitation and regurgitation in all the gulfs and rivers that line the coasts of the Northern, or more properly, the Land Hemisphere. These gurgitations swell the ...
— Scientific American, Vol. 17, No. 26 December 28, 1867 • Various

... Reichstag) that Germany was on the eve of similar events. We went with this hope. During the first days of this visit to Brest-Litovsk the wireless brought us from Vilna the first news that in Berlin an enormous strike movement was developing; this movement as well as that of Austria-Hungary was directly connected with the course of negotiations in Brest. However, as is often the case, by reason of the dialectic of the class ...
— From October to Brest-Litovsk • Leon Trotzky

... regards Mary Garland. I am divinely happy! Does n't it strike you? You ought to agree with me. You wish me to spare her feelings; I spare them by staying away. Last night I ...
— Roderick Hudson • Henry James

... heard a clock in the room strike three. I got up, stretched my arms, yawned and knew that my head was clear and my brain at peace. I can't describe my feelings better than by saying that it was as though I had put my brain and my heart and all my fears and terrors under a good stiff pump of ...
— The Dark Forest • Hugh Walpole

... to prepare it for the spring; but I am determined not to begin to publish with less than five numbers done. I see my opening perfectly, with the one main line on which the story is to turn; and if I don't strike while the iron (meaning myself) is hot, I shall drift off again, and have to go through ...
— The Life of Charles Dickens, Vol. I-III, Complete • John Forster

... atmospheric acetylene burners in which the flame would not be likely to strike back to the nipple has already been referred to in connexion with the construction atmospheric burners for incandescent lighting. Owing, however, to the large proportions of the atmospheric burners of boiling rings ...
— Acetylene, The Principles Of Its Generation And Use • F. H. Leeds and W. J. Atkinson Butterfield

... of another, the invisible motions of the air have been properly enough compared to the visible waves of water produced by throwing a stone therein. These waves spread themselves in all directions in concentric circles, whose common centre is the spot where the stone fell, and when they strike against a bank or other obstacle, they return in the contrary direction to the place from whence they proceeded. Sound in like manner expands in every direction, and the extent of its progress is in proportion to the impulse on the vibrating ...
— Popular Lectures on Zoonomia - Or The Laws of Animal Life, in Health and Disease • Thomas Garnett

... astonishment and fright, Tom left himself to the stream, holding his breath hard, and, paddling gently with his hands, soon came to the surface, and was about to strike out for the shore when he caught sight of a skiff coming, stern foremost, down the descent after him. Down she came, as straight as an arrow, into the tumult below, the sculler sitting upright, and holding his skulls ...
— The World's Greatest Books, Volume V. • Arthur Mee and J.A. Hammerton, Eds.

... The word is Polynesian; its first occurrence in English is in Cook's account of Tahiti. The Tahitian word is Tatau, which means tattoo marks on the human skin, from Ta, which means a mark or design. (Littre.) The Maori verb, ta, means to cut, to tattoo, to strike. See Moko. ...
— A Dictionary of Austral English • Edward Morris

... were others. I would see them walk in the streets like ghosts, and be troubled, and start awake: but never now could such a thing, I think, occur to me in sleep: for the wildness of the circumstance would certainly strike my consciousness, and immediately I should know that the dream was a dream. For now, at least, I am sole, I am lord. The golden walls of this palace which I have built look down, enamoured of their reflection, into a lake ...
— The Purple Cloud • M.P. Shiel

... generous beliefs at twenty-five years of age which, unless we cultivate and keep ourselves in the love of them, thin out like wasting magic, and no necromancy can ever conjure them back again. You young men have potencies of hope and enthusiasm which, if denied expression, strike inwardly and corrupt the source ...
— Men in the Making • Ambrose Shepherd

... said. "The passion is illicit, although certainly drawn with a good deal of pathos. It is not a work one could possibly put into the hands of a lady; which is to be regretted on all accounts, for I do not know how it may strike you; but it seems to me—as a depiction, if I make myself clear—to rise high above its compeers—even famous compeers. Even in Scott, Dickens, Thackeray, or Hawthorne, the sentiment of love appears to me to be frequently done less ...
— The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition Vol. 13 (of 25) • Robert Louis Stevenson

... person—eloped with him, to tell the truth. Her people, not without reason, were dreadfully put out. The children were brought up rather anyhow. Marshall did not go to a public school, which he imagines places him at a disadvantage with other men. Perhaps it does. Men always strike me as being quaintly narrow-minded on that subject. Later he was sent to Cambridge with the idea of his taking Orders and going into the Church. My husband's elder brother, Leonard Frayling, is patron of several livings. ...
— Deadham Hard • Lucas Malet

... of Catholics in the south of Ireland resolved to rise and, trusting to their own right arms, to strike for independence. A frightful rebellion broke out (1798), marked by all the intense hatred springing from rival races and rival creeds, and aggravated by the peasants' hatred of oppressive landlords. Both ...
— The Leading Facts of English History • D.H. Montgomery

... which run swiftly along this coast, carried the vessel quietly, but with force, upon a sand-bank. The heedless boy had not noticed the breakers, although they made a roaring that might have been heard a league. No sooner, however, did he feel the rudder strike, and hear the tumult of the rushing sea, than he began to cry for aid. Columbus, whose careful thoughts never permitted him to sleep profoundly, was the first on deck. The master of the ship, whose duty it was to have been on watch, next made his appearance, followed by ...
— MacMillan's Reading Books - Book V • Anonymous

... Tunstall, "I think you are but half-bred English yourself. How came you to strike on the Scotsman's side ...
— The Fortunes of Nigel • Sir Walter Scott

... the occasion of bringing plenty of ghosts to escort their new companion, and perhaps fetch some one else. All night the friends of the deceased sit up and keep the drums going to drive away the spirits; they strike the fences and posts of houses all through the village with sticks. This is done to drive back the spirits to their own quarters on the adjacent mountain tops. But it is the spirits of the inland tribes, ...
— Folklore as an Historical Science • George Laurence Gomme

... but a silver watch To tell the time of night; If you should wake, and wish to know The hour, don't strike ...
— Songs for a Little House • Christopher Morley

... the Italian side six, on the Roman side five, lieutenant-commanders, each of whom conducted the attack or defence in a definite district, while the consular armies were destined to act more freely and to strike the decisive blow. The most esteemed Roman officers, such as Gaius Marius, Quintus Catulus, and the two consulars of experience in the Spanish war, Titus Didius and Publius Crassus, placed themselves at the ...
— The History of Rome (Volumes 1-5) • Theodor Mommsen

... not finished; I spoke of the fruits of evil; now as my heart prompts me I speak of the promise of good. Let this woman go free as you have the power to do; strike the chains off her neck and take back the price that you have paid for her, since she has property which will discharge it to the last farthing, which property to-day stands in her name and can be conveyed to you. Then, go search the Scriptures ...
— Pearl-Maiden • H. Rider Haggard

... in Moscow, and (above all) a dim consciousness in every soldier's mind that the relative strength of the armies had changed and that the advantage was now on our side. There was a substantial change in the relative strength, and an advance had become inevitable. And at once, as a clock begins to strike and chime as soon as the minute hand has completed a full circle, this change was shown by an increased activity, whirring, and ...
— War and Peace • Leo Tolstoy

... Brunswick-Bevern ("Governor of Stettin," one of the Duke-Ferdinand cousinry, frugal and valiant), gave the highest satisfaction; seldom was such firing, such furious pushing; they had spent ninety cartridges a man; were at last quite out of cartridges; so that Bevern had to say, "Strike in with bayonets, MEINE KINDER; butt-ends, or what we have; HERAN!" Our Grenadiers were mainly they that burnt Lobositz. "How salutary now would it have been," says Epimetheus Lloyd, "had Browne had a small battery on the other side of the Elbe;" whereby he might ...
— History of Friedrich II. of Prussia, Vol. XVII. (of XXI.) - Frederick The Great—The Seven-Years War: First Campaign—1756-1757. • Thomas Carlyle

... talking broken Dutch for months together, I almost forgot how to speak my own language correctly. My very ideas (for I had not entirely lost the reflecting faculty) became confused and limited, for want of intellectual companions to strike out new lights, and form new combinations in the regions of thought; clearly showing that man was not intended to live alone. Getting, at length, tired of this solitary and unproductive life, I started for ...
— Roughing it in the Bush • Susanna Moodie

... carried your torn body on my shoulder to the safety of your lodge. Ah, you remember? You have not forgotten the Big Buffalo? Then, why do you hesitate? The man who has courage to seize a Father of the Church, surely can strike his brother. This is not the brave Tegakwita I ...
— The Road to Frontenac • Samuel Merwin

... Ellen and begged her to hook up the back of the degage blouse. Young Kerrigan mustered the town band. The members had strayed a little through the crowd, but at the summons of their leader they gathered in a circle. Kerrigan looked eagerly at Dr. O'Grady awaiting the signal to strike up "Rule Britannia." Dr. O'Grady, unable to make himself heard through the cheering of the people, signalled a frantic negative. The stranger stepped out of his motor-car. Father McCormack, bowing low, advanced ...
— General John Regan - 1913 • George A. Birmingham

... it, my dear," Elsie said; "indeed, I think it may perhaps be our best plan. How does it strike you, father?" ...
— Elsie at Nantucket • Martha Finley

... clock began to strike twelve, all the bells in the little town began to ring, some firing was heard, and shouts from passers-by in the streets ...
— Marjorie's New Friend • Carolyn Wells

... change is one that does not stop at the surface, but reaches down to the very root, and is entire, thorough, total; since the majority find superficial treatment of any matter the easiest and most comfortable, radical measures, which strike at the root of evil or need, are apt to be looked ...
— English Synonyms and Antonyms - With Notes on the Correct Use of Prepositions • James Champlin Fernald

... islands and rugged volcanic islands in the southwestern Pacific Ocean; subject to tropical cyclones (typhoons) in southeast and east Asia from May to December (most frequent from July to October); tropical cyclones (hurricanes) may form south of Mexico and strike Central America and Mexico from June to October (most common in August and September); southern shipping lanes subject to icebergs from Antarctica; occasional El Nino phenomenon occurs off the coast of Peru when the trade winds ...
— The 1993 CIA World Factbook • United States. Central Intelligence Agency.

... yellow, green, blue, and violet. Perhaps your limitations are not the same as ours, but our scientists are trying to discover some means by which we can arrest and make use of a small part at least of those waves which strike our bodies at a frequency between forty thousand and four hundred million millions. It is still an unsolved problem, this search for another sense, and we are now looking forward for help in the task to the studies of the civilization ...
— Daybreak: A Romance of an Old World • James Cowan

... "Strike your flag!" the rebel cries, In his arrogant old plantation strain. "Never!" our gallant Morris replies; "It is better to sink than to yield!" And the whole air pealed With the cheers ...
— How the Flag Became Old Glory • Emma Look Scott

... strike you? [Conning] "Many Renaissance pictures, especially those of Botticelli, Francesca and Piero di Cosimo were inspired by such legends as that of Orpheus, and we owe a tiny gem—like Raphael 'Apollo and Marsyas' to the same ...
— Forsyte Saga • John Galsworthy

... a sealed letter to Lieutenant-Colonel Ernst Ludwig Wilhelm von Specht, also one to Colonel Montresor. These were much to my purpose. Finally, as I heard the great clock on the stairway strike ten, I scribbled on a sheet of paper under Von Knyphausen's arms, "Captain Allan McLane presents his compliments to General von Knyphausen, and hopes he will do Captain McLane the honour to return his visit.—February 20, ...
— Hugh Wynne, Free Quaker • S. Weir Mitchell

... by a spirited and diversified delivery; and such was said to be the versatility of Whitefield's vocal power, that he could imitate the tones of a female, or the infant voice, at one time, and at another, strike his hearers with awe, by the ...
— The American Union Speaker • John D. Philbrick

... great wallet, all full of feathers, more than was on all the eagles of all the hunting grounds of the red men, and tearing it open, easy as we tear a leaf, poured them on the fire. Big black smoke puff up quick as powder flash, and down come Indian like he shot. White squaw take up big tomahawk, and strike both on the head. Me nearly in the door by this time; big squaw jump at me with he great tomahawk, so big the great chief no lift it, and lifted it to strike. Me no like to be killed by old squaw, so me come away." A very marvelous story told the Indians, full of high flourishes ...
— Ellen Walton - The Villain and His Victims • Alvin Addison

... dead shops stare at one from smashed windows and gutted interiors. And it is not a vast caravanserai for sufferers like Constantinople. Something, however, is wrong and has been wrong and will be worse, and this something has power to strike the imagination of every one who visits the great city of Vienna. It is perhaps the contrast of luxury on the one hand and black bread on the other, and the almost fabulous descent of the crown. Wrangel's officers ...
— Europe—Whither Bound? - Being Letters of Travel from the Capitals of Europe in the Year 1921 • Stephen Graham

... fare, the driver strikes a bell, and the hand moves to the figure 1—that is, "one fare, and paid for," and there is your receipt, as good as if you had it in your pocket. When a passenger pays his fare and the driver does not strike the bell immediately, he is greeted "Strike ...
— Innocents abroad • Mark Twain

... "How does it strike you? One loves to get at new impressions of what one has known all one's life. Nothing strikes us here, I suppose. Do ...
— Nobody • Susan Warner

... into the depression back of the camp-fire, and plunging after him. Wilson had made a flying leap just in time to avoid being struck, and he turned to see Anson go down. There came a crash, a groan, and then the strike and pound of hoofs as the horse struggled up. Apparently he ...
— The Man of the Forest • Zane Grey

... of an impending strike of brewery workers in the North. Several employees have threatened ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 153, Dec. 12, 1917 • Various

... perception of beauty, the knowledge of truth; learn to distinguish between the realities of life and the dross of life; and you have a great shield of fortitude of which certainly man cannot rob you, and against which sickness, sorrow, or misfortune may strike tremendous blows without so much as ...
— Once Aboard The Lugger • Arthur Stuart-Menteth Hutchinson

... that we should feel our minds strongly impressed by this discovery of fresh evidence. We should feel a renewal of the same sentiment in first reading the Gospel of Saint John. That of Saint Mark perhaps would strike us as an abridgment of the history with which we were already acquainted; but we should naturally reflect, that if that history was abridged by such a person as Mark, or by any person of so early an age, it afforded one of the highest possible ...
— Evidences of Christianity • William Paley

... he humorously cries to his enemies, "do not strike a dead man; beware, scribblers, of fathering your pasquinades against authority upon me; for seven years the True-Born Englishman is tied under sureties and penalties not ...
— Daniel Defoe • William Minto

... 'Round she goes. Strike up a song, somebody," shouted Jack; and then he leaned over and spoke so that not only the two men who were heaving at the bar with him but also the three who were on the bar in front could hear every word he said. "Listen, boys," said he earnestly. ...
— Marcy The Blockade Runner • Harry Castlemon

... rose, as if she were lifting her face above the reach of the hand that had tried to strike it. Her voice throbbed ...
— The Helpmate • May Sinclair

... piece of a palm leaf Whereon were writ—think well before you do. "This is," he said, "my father's dying gift; By the advice here giv'n I will abide," Then woke his wife, and in firm tones thus asked, "Who is this youth that has defiled my bed? Speak ere I strike you both." The wond'ring wife The dagger and the stranger saw and cried— "Kill me alone, but spare my only son." "Thy only son!" he said; "now wake him up, And let us all adore our Maker first, Who saved us from my frenzy, which in one Short moment ...
— Tales of Ind - And Other Poems • T. Ramakrishna

... the word for me When I hear my 8-h.p. Latest model motor-bike, Having dodged the latest strike, Is awaiting me complete At the ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 158, April 14, 1920 • Various

... use of reduced charges, they were able to drop their shells with a steep angle of descent. A high velocity gun, with a flat projectory, like our 18-pounder, has two disadvantages in mountain warfare. When the gun is firing from behind a steep hill, the shell, on leaving the gun, is liable to strike the hill in front instead of clearing the crest. When the projectile reaches the distant ridge (behind which the enemy are presumably taking cover), the angle of descent is not sufficiently steep to cause damage. ...
— With the British Army in The Holy Land • Henry Osmond Lock

... to see Mr Handycock, and very anxious to have my dinner, I was not sorry to hear the clock on the stairs strike four, when Mrs Handycock again jumped up, and put her head over the banisters, "Jemima, Jemima, it's four o'clock!" "I hear it, marm," replied the cook; and she gave the frying-pan a twist, which made the hissing and the smell come flying up into the ...
— Peter Simple and The Three Cutters, Vol. 1-2 • Frederick Marryat

... the bobbins began to dance around the maypole, sewing-machines sang lustily; the telephone only ceased ringing to deliver messages. Miss Rabbit became hysterical, vehement, cross; Gertie's intervention became necessary to prevent a strike amongst the ...
— Love at Paddington • W. Pett Ridge

... strange attraction held me fastened to the spot. Presently something appeared to trip or stumble inside of the infernal mechanism. I waited for the sound I knew was to follow. How nervous I got! It seemed to me that it would never strike. At last the minute-hand reached the highest point of the dial. Then there was a little stir among the works, as there is in a congregation as it rises to receive the benediction. It was no form of blessing which rung out those deep, almost sepulchral tones. ...
— The Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table • Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr. (The Physician and Poet not the Jurist)

... course, you'll do with your own as you like." Then, as if changing the subject, he went on cheerfully: "Perhaps you'll wonder why I picked out that spot on the hillside. Well, first, because I reserved it after my strike in case the lead should run that way, but it didn't. Next, because when you first came here you seemed to like the prospect. You used to sit there looking at it, as if it reminded you of something. You never said it did. They ...
— A Millionaire of Rough-and-Ready • Bret Harte

... and a bound; his feet bounce up like rubber balls each time they strike the earth; his legs snap back into place after each step as if pulled by a spring. If he stumbles and falls to the ground, he bounces back up into the air without a scar. (You see, his skin springs back into shape even if it ...
— Common Science • Carleton W. Washburne

... great, but without food he could not, as he desired, dash at once into the enemy's country. He moved southward when he had food, halted when it gave out, and finally reached the Coosa. From his camp there, which he named Fort Strother, he dispatched Coffee to strike a first blow against the Creek town of Tallusahatchee. Coffee destroyed the town, and not a warrior escaped, for the whites were bitterly revengeful. A slain mother embracing a living infant was found among the dead. Jackson himself took care of the child, sent it to The Hermitage, ...
— Andrew Jackson • William Garrott Brown

... he, ''tain't Eben's bag after all.'—'Not his bag!' cries I, in a fright.—'Nothing of the sort,' says he; 'I knows his bag quite well. Besides, just feel the weight of it; there's no tools in this bag.'—'Well, it did strike me,' says I, 'as it were very light. What's to be done now? They'll be after me for stealing a bag. I wonder what's in it? Not much, I'm sure; just a few shirts and pocket-handkerchers, or some other gents' ...
— True to his Colours - The Life that Wears Best • Theodore P. Wilson

... suffering and equally restless. This friend was the Italian Prince Seravalle, who also had drank deep of the cup of bitterness. In his youth, feeling deeply the decadence, both moral and physical, of his country, he had attempted to strike a blow to restore it to its former splendour; he headed a conspiracy, expended a large portion of his wealth in pursuit of his object, was betrayed by his associates, and for many years was imprisoned by the authorities in the ...
— Travels and Adventures of Monsieur Violet • Captain Marryat

... middle point of our course, and here we will make a new start. All the wonderful histories which we have been studying in the last five lectures have had little or nothing to do with living creatures. The sunbeams would strike on our earth, the air would move restlessly to and fro, the water-drops would rise and fall, the valleys and ravines would still be cut out by rivers , if there were no such thing as life upon the earth. But without living things there could be none of the beauty ...
— The Fairy-Land of Science • Arabella B. Buckley

... have just passed over the bar that separates the one half of the 18th century from the other: and among the ensuing eminent collectors, whose brave fronts strike us with respect, is GENERAL DORMER:[386] a soldier who, I warrant you, had faced full many a cannon, and stormed many a rampart, with courage and success. But he could not resist the raging influence of the Book-Mania: nor could all his embrasures and entrenchments screen ...
— Bibliomania; or Book-Madness - A Bibliographical Romance • Thomas Frognall Dibdin

... and tried to strike with the stick, but Tom's blood was up, and he closed with him, getting right in beyond his guard, and for the next few minutes there was a fierce struggle, ending in both going down together, Tom unfortunately undermost, and by the time he gained his feet his adversary was off again, running ...
— The Vast Abyss - The Story of Tom Blount, his Uncles and his Cousin Sam • George Manville Fenn

... morning. This corps numbers now 15,300 men. They take with them neither wagons nor artillery; these latter marching with the balance of the army to the James River. The remainder of the army will cross the Chickahominy at Long Bridge and at Jones's, and strike the river at the most practicable ...
— Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Complete • Ulysses S. Grant

... which had uncommon success. The dresses were Chinese. Twelve assistants held small drums furnished with bells; these were struck in the air by the dancer's feet when held as high as their arms could reach. This Aldridge performed, and improved upon by stretching his legs asunder, so as to strike two drums at the same time. Those not being the days of elegant dancing, I afterwards," continued the stranger, "exhibited at Paris the tambourine dance, to so much advantage, that I made fifteen ...
— Richard Lovell Edgeworth - A Selection From His Memoir • Richard Lovell Edgeworth

... THEY bid me strike the idle strings, As if my summer days Had shaken sunbeams from their wings To warm my autumn lays; They bring to me their painted urn, As if it were not time To lift my gauntlet and to spurn The lists ...
— The Poetical Works of Oliver Wendell Holmes, Complete • Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr.

... formidable had crept into the world about us. For, undoubtedly, there was a disquieting thought, holding terror as well as awe, in the picture his words conjured up: the conception of a human will reaching its deathless hand, spiteful and destructive, down through the ages, to strike the ...
— Three John Silence Stories • Algernon Blackwood

... 11th an attempt was made to strike deep-sea soundings, but failed from the drawing of a splice used to connect two portions of the spun-yarn employed. On the following day the attempt was repeated by Captain Stanley, unsuccessfully, however, no bottom having ...
— Narrative Of The Voyage Of H.M.S. Rattlesnake, Commanded By The Late Captain Owen Stanley, R.N., F.R.S. Etc. During The Years 1846-1850. Including Discoveries And Surveys In New Guinea, The Louisiade • John MacGillivray

... reorganize his plans and his party; to wait until a certain reaction should set in, a reaction very likely to come about because of the apparent incapacity and the unattractive character of George the First, and then at some timely hour, with well-matured preparations, to strike an energetic blow. George the First was only a year on the throne when the adherents of James got up a ...
— A History of the Four Georges, Volume I (of 4) • Justin McCarthy

... enough, given her inborn power of enjoyment of nature, to delight in the free air and the wonderful sights around her. She gives in her book a pretty picture of the child watching the birds that flew against the lighthouse lantern, when they lived at White Island. The birds would strike it with such force as to kill themselves. "Many a May morning," she says, "have I wandered about the rock at the foot of the tower, mourning over a little apron brimful of sparrows, swallows, thrushes, robins, fire-winged blackbirds, ...
— Authors and Friends • Annie Fields

... the men followed his example of holding them ready to strike at what they could see of the crocodile, and as they were carried closer by the tide and Rodd could just make out below the muddy surface that the water was being stirred by the undulation of the ...
— The Ocean Cat's Paw - The Story of a Strange Cruise • George Manville Fenn

... the uneasy fear and uneasy attraction that a creature whom a man feels to be greater than himself often wakes in him. That evening, while Julian sat with her, he had been seized with curious conflicting desires to fall before her or to strike her, to draw her close or to fend her off from him, all dull, too, and vague as in heaviness of dreaming. Those feelings, vague in the house, were scarcely clearer in the cold and in the open spaces of the night, and Julian was conscious of a sense of irritation, of anger against himself. ...
— Flames • Robert Smythe Hichens

... the 7th of August, Jackson received intelligence that General Burnside, with a considerable portion of McClellan's force, had embarked, and was on the way to join Pope. He determined to strike a blow at once, and marched with his entire force from Gordonsville for Barnett ...
— With Lee in Virginia - A Story of the American Civil War • G. A. Henty

... those countries have rebuilt, Guinea's own vulnerability to political and economic crisis has increased. Declining economic conditions and popular dissatisfaction with corruption and bad governance prompted two massive strikes in 2006; a third nationwide strike in early 2007 sparked violent protests in many Guinean cities and prompted two weeks of martial law. To appease the unions and end the unrest, CONTE named a new prime minister in ...
— The 2008 CIA World Factbook • United States. Central Intelligence Agency.

... steps eastward over the Eastern Branch, up Good Hope Hill, and on till you strike the Marlborough pike, as a trio of us did that cold February Sunday we walked from ...
— Winter Sunshine • John Burroughs

... will strike any reader of Scott's history and writings, is his bold unworldliness and vigorous independence of mind. He followed truth wherever it led him, beginning with Unitarianism, and ending in a zealous faith in the Holy Trinity. ...
— Apologia pro Vita Sua • John Henry Newman

... shoot you dead, and the 50 is mine,' and never giving time for answer, fires. Elzevir stood on the other side of the well-mouth, and it seemed the other could not miss him at such a distance; but as I blinked my eyes at the flash, I felt the bullet strike the iron chain to which I was holding, and ...
— Moonfleet • J. Meade Falkner

... to perform. They know nothing of human suffering and want, and do not believe that they can ever be affected by anything of the kind. And this is why they are so astounded, and remain so helpless, when the hand of misfortune does strike them. I wish to preserve ...
— Queen Hortense - A Life Picture of the Napoleonic Era • L. Muhlbach

... have attempted to form an arrangement of knowledge is that I may test the amount of my own acquirements. I shall form an extensive list of subjects on this plan, and as I acquire any one of them I shall strike it out of the list. May the list soon get black! though at present I shall hardly be able, I am afraid, to spot ...
— The Life and Letters of Thomas Henry Huxley Volume 1 • Leonard Huxley

... yet for God knows what explosions Before he goes. He'll stay awhile. Just wait: Just wait a year or two for Cleopatra, For she's to be a balsam and a comfort; And that's not all a jape of mine now, either. For granted once the old way of Apollo Sings in a man, he may then, if he's able, Strike unafraid whatever strings he will Upon the last and wildest of new lyres; Nor out of his new magic, though it hymn The shrieks of dungeoned hell, shall he create A madness or a gloom to shut quite out A cleaving daylight, and a last great calm Triumphant over shipwreck and all storms. He might have ...
— The Man Against the Sky • Edwin Arlington Robinson

... boys have never mistaken your companion Paul for this table or this tree?—Oh, no!—Why?—Because the table and the tree are inanimate and insensible, whereas Paul lives and feels.—Good. If you strike the table it will feel nothing and you will not hurt it; but have you any right to destroy it?—No, we should be destroying something belonging to others.—Then what is it you respect in the table? the inanimate and insensible wood, ...
— Spontaneous Activity in Education • Maria Montessori

... close by, and notwithstanding McClellan's savage order against taking anything, in a short time that field had upon it, almost a man to a hill of potatoes. It did not take long to dig that field. Our anticipations of a day of rest, with a vegetable diet, were disappointed. The bugles sounded "Strike tents," and we were soon on our way on the road ...
— Personal Recollections of the War of 1861 • Charles Augustus Fuller

... ain't afraid of her brooding on what she doesn't know. It's the fear it may fly up and strike her when she ain't looking that worries me, and it worried the Professor, too. That was why he told me. I guess when he talked to me that time he knew his heart was going to stop suddenly some day. And he'd got a hint ...
— A Hoosier Chronicle • Meredith Nicholson

... it before; but it will cut me up to strike out and leave all this behind. I want another chance; and do you ...
— The Boy Scouts Book of Stories • Various

... discoverer, and to his mind was revealed, in all its fulness and force, that great principle which lies at the basis of the system of instruction which he initiated,—"that there is no more necessary or natural connection between abstract ideas and the articulate sounds which strike the ear, than there is between the same ideas and the written characters which address themselves to the eye." It was this principle, derided by the many, dimly perceived by the few, which led to the development of the sign-language, the means ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 1, No. 6, April, 1858 • Various

... at me in a kind of sotto voce way, and with that natural exuberance or intellectual "gall" that never fails to strike the "bull's eye," I bluntly said that Garnier's philosophy and composition were as different from Shakspere's as the ...
— Shakspere, Personal Recollections • John A. Joyce

... storm coat," cautioned Tom, "and you, too, Jerry-Jo; we'll get the wind when we pass Dreamer's Rock and strike the ...
— The Place Beyond the Winds • Harriet T. Comstock

... happened to strike into the same road which he took the time before, that is, the plains of Montiel, over which he traveled with less inconveniency than when he went alone, by reason it was yet early in the morning; at which time the rays of the sun, striking obliquely upon them, ...
— The Children's Hour, v 5. Stories From Seven Old Favorites • Eva March Tappan

... "Did you observe anybody strike Montgomery, or was a club thrown? The stroke came from a stick or club that was in somebody's hand, and the blow struck his gun and his arm." "Was he knocked down?... He fell, I am sure.... His gun flew out of hand, and as he stooped to take it ...
— The Emancipation of Massachusetts • Brooks Adams

... shamefaced way, "that I wouldn't feel more homely myself if I was put away with my old .450 Express and the fowlin'-piece, the shorter one with the rubbered stock, and a clip or two of cartridges—just a fool's fancy, of course, but there it is. How does it strike you, Herr Professor?" ...
— The Poison Belt • Arthur Conan Doyle

... The grass lay stretched in the direction of the hurricane as if a flood of water had passed over it. Horses, cattle and human beings had been lifted and carried several rods through the air, then cast violently to earth again. Those who witnessed the course of the tornado said that it seemed to strike the ground, then go up in the air, passing harmlessly over a mile or two of country, then strike again, all the time whirling over and over, and occasionally casting out fragments of the spoils it had gathered up. After passing east to a point ...
— Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science, Volume 26, July 1880. • Various

... increased as disease made greater inroads upon them. I saw in one instance two brothers-both of whom died the next day of scurvy—and who were so helpless as to be unable to rise, pull themselves up on their knees by clenching the poles of their tents —in order to strike each other with clubs, and they kept striking until the bystanders interfered and took ...
— Andersonville, complete • John McElroy

... back to strike at her with his eyes, hard and keen, dark blue like the blade of a new knife ... "Because he hasn't given her what ...
— The Romantic • May Sinclair

... election, we have wished that we could see the church of God as much in earnest to send men to heaven as they are to send those they vote for to Parliament. It must strike some of the ungodly, when they have Christian men at ...
— Broken Bread - from an Evangelist's Wallet • Thomas Champness

... if you go to hell, there will be a devil at your side to strike you. He will go on striking you every minute forever and ever without end. The first stroke will make your body as bad as the body of Job, covered from head to foot with sores and ulcers. The second ...
— Love's Final Victory • Horatio

... benefit it is in my power to render him seems small. Besides, our action on each other, good as well as evil, is so incidental and at random that we can seldom hear the acknowledgments of any person who would thank us for a benefit, without some shame and humiliation. We can rarely strike a direct stroke, but must be content with an oblique one; we seldom have the satisfaction of yielding a direct benefit which is directly received. But rectitude scatters favors on every side without knowing it, and receives with wonder the thanks of ...
— Essays, Second Series • Ralph Waldo Emerson

... wood a few inches wide and about half a foot long, bore a hole in one end of it, and tie a few yards of twine into the hole. The piece of wood was rapidly whirled around the head under the belief that the thunder would cease, or that the thunder-bolt would not strike. It went by the name of the ...
— The Child and Childhood in Folk-Thought • Alexander F. Chamberlain

... of good morals, excellent in virtue and virtuous deeds, skilled in the use of weapons to strike with, or to be thrown, brave men, eager for ...
— Chips From A German Workshop, Vol. V. • F. Max Mueller

... machines, and just as all former expeditions had done, opened the assault at once with a shower of the poison shells. I relied, it will be seen, upon the surprise of my attack to strike terror into the hearts of ...
— The Lord of Death and the Queen of Life • Homer Eon Flint

... boy, that it did not strike you in the back," said Mrs Hugh Berrington, examining the wound, which she thought far more severe than Paul was inclined to ...
— The Young Berringtons - The Boy Explorers • W.H.G. Kingston

... was this second impossible retort—the first, evidently, did not cross his mind—that was occupying Gerald. He was not slow in seeing delicacies, though he was slow indeed in seeing what might have been solemnities. The position couldn't strike him as solemn; he couldn't conceive that a woman might break off her engagement for such a cause; but he did see his own ...
— Franklin Kane • Anne Douglas Sedgwick



Words linked to "Strike" :   pick, walk out, knock, sympathetic strike, retaliate, pitch, sympathy strike, penetrate, smite, ten-strike, ping, work, glance, strike up, find, knock about, run into, fall, tip, smasher, come about, pull down, chance upon, occur, pip, achieve, tap, take place, strike-slip fault, pat, delivery, dab, spat, perforate, coin, strike off, hunger strike, light upon, level, pre-emptive strike, smash hit, sclaff, jab, pierce, pass, shape, disturb, assume, batter, bottom, make, sleeper, onrush, sideswipe, hit, knock against, hap, slap, butt, create from raw material, happen upon, even, strike a note, strike a blow, blockbuster, fill, strike dumb, shine, motivate, form, smash, stir, bump into, bunt, cloud, knock down, delete, affect, strike home, even out, preventive attack, strike out, work stoppage, infect, lick, zap, sit-down, shoot, strike a chord, take up, regain, collide with, reach, bear on, slice, flush, score, upset, show, spur, read, impinge on, strike down, hit home, beak, create from raw stuff, cut down, smooth, alienate, engrave, attain, trouble, experience, push down, smoothen, beat, thud, striking, dissent, sweep off, come to, rap, strike pay, miss, come upon, jar, hew, strickle, prompt, connect, protest, expunge, mint, strike hard, instill, occupy, bump, stroke



Copyright © 2018 Dictonary.net