Dictonary.netDictonary.net
Synonyms, antonyms, pronunciation

  Home
English Dictionary      examples: 'day', 'get rid of', 'New York Bay'




Stand   Listen
verb
Stand  v. i.  (past & past part. stood; pres. part. standing)  
1.
To be at rest in an erect position; to be fixed in an upright or firm position; as:
(a)
To be supported on the feet, in an erect or nearly erect position; opposed to lie, sit, kneel, etc. "I pray you all, stand up!"
(b)
To continue upright in a certain locality, as a tree fixed by the roots, or a building resting on its foundation. "It stands as it were to the ground yglued." "The ruined wall Stands when its wind-worn battlements are gone."
2.
To occupy or hold a place; to have a situation; to be situated or located; as, Paris stands on the Seine. "Wite ye not where there stands a little town?"
3.
To cease from progress; not to proceed; to stop; to pause; to halt; to remain stationary. "I charge thee, stand, And tell thy name." "The star, which they saw in the east, went before them, till it came and stood over where the young child was."
4.
To remain without ruin or injury; to hold good against tendencies to impair or injure; to be permanent; to endure; to last; hence, to find endurance, strength, or resources. "My mind on its own center stands unmoved."
5.
To maintain one's ground; to be acquitted; not to fail or yield; to be safe. "Readers by whose judgment I would stand or fall."
6.
To maintain an invincible or permanent attitude; to be fixed, steady, or firm; to take a position in resistance or opposition. "The standing pattern of their imitation." "The king granted the Jews... to gather themselves together, and to stand for their life."
7.
To adhere to fixed principles; to maintain moral rectitude; to keep from falling into error or vice. "We must labor so as to stand with godliness, according to his appointment."
8.
To have or maintain a position, order, or rank; to be in a particular relation; as, Christian charity, or love, stands first in the rank of gifts.
9.
To be in some particular state; to have essence or being; to be; to consist. "Sacrifices... which stood only in meats and drinks." "Accomplish what your signs foreshow; I stand resigned, and am prepared to go." "Thou seest how it stands with me, and that I may not tarry."
10.
To be consistent; to agree; to accord. "Doubt me not; by heaven, I will do nothing But what may stand with honor."
11.
(Naut.) To hold a course at sea; as, to stand from the shore; to stand for the harbor. "From the same parts of heaven his navy stands."
12.
To offer one's self, or to be offered, as a candidate. "He stood to be elected one of the proctors of the university."
13.
To stagnate; not to flow; to be motionless. "Or the black water of Pomptina stands."
14.
To measure when erect on the feet. "Six feet two, as I think, he stands."
15.
(Law)
(a)
To be or remain as it is; to continue in force; to have efficacy or validity; to abide.
(b)
To appear in court.
16.
(Card Playing) To be, or signify that one is, willing to play with one's hand as dealt.
Stand by (Naut.), a preparatory order, equivalent to Be ready.
To stand against, to oppose; to resist.
To stand by.
(a)
To be near; to be a spectator; to be present.
(b)
To be aside; to be set aside with disregard. "In the interim (we) let the commands stand by neglected."
(c)
To maintain; to defend; to support; not to desert; as, to stand by one's principles or party.
(d)
To rest on for support; to be supported by.
(e)
To remain as a spectator, and take no part in an action; as, we can't just stand idly by while people are being killed.
To stand corrected, to be set right, as after an error in a statement of fact; to admit having been in error.
To stand fast, to be fixed; to be unshaken or immovable.
To stand firmly on, to be satisfied or convinced of. "Though Page be a secure fool, and stands so firmly on his wife's frailty."
To stand for.
(a)
To side with; to espouse the cause of; to support; to maintain, or to profess or attempt to maintain; to defend. "I stand wholly for you."
(b)
To be in the place of; to be the substitute or representative of; to represent; as, a cipher at the left hand of a figure stands for nothing. "I will not trouble myself, whether these names stand for the same thing, or really include one another."
(c)
To tolerate; as, I won't stand for any delay.
To stand in, to cost. "The same standeth them in much less cost." "The Punic wars could not have stood the human race in less than three millions of the species."
To stand in hand, to conduce to one's interest; to be serviceable or advantageous.
To stand off.
(a)
To keep at a distance.
(b)
Not to comply.
(c)
To keep at a distance in friendship, social intercourse, or acquaintance.
(d)
To appear prominent; to have relief. "Picture is best when it standeth off, as if it were carved."
To stand off and on (Naut.), to remain near a coast by sailing toward land and then from it.
To stand on (Naut.), to continue on the same tack or course.
To stand out.
(a)
To project; to be prominent. "Their eyes stand out with fatness."
(b)
To persist in opposition or resistance; not to yield or comply; not to give way or recede. "His spirit is come in, That so stood out against the holy church."
To stand to.
(a)
To ply; to urge; to persevere in using. "Stand to your tackles, mates, and stretch your oars."
(b)
To remain fixed in a purpose or opinion. "I will stand to it, that this is his sense."
(c)
To abide by; to adhere to; as to a contract, assertion, promise, etc.; as, to stand to an award; to stand to one's word.
(d)
Not to yield; not to fly; to maintain, as one's ground. "Their lives and fortunes were put in safety, whether they stood to it or ran away."
(e)
To be consistent with; to agree with; as, it stands to reason that he could not have done so; same as stand with, below.
(f)
To support; to uphold. "Stand to me in this cause."
To stand together, to be consistent; to agree.
To stand to reason to be reasonable; to be expected.
To stand to sea (Naut.), to direct the course from land.
To stand under, to undergo; to withstand.
To stand up.
(a)
To rise from sitting; to be on the feet.
(b)
To arise in order to speak or act. "Against whom, when the accusers stood up, they brought none accusation of such things as I supposed."
(c)
To rise and stand on end, as the hair.
(d)
To put one's self in opposition; to contend. "Once we stood up about the corn."
To stand up for, to defend; to justify; to support, or attempt to support; as, to stand up for the administration.
To stand upon.
(a)
To concern; to interest.
(b)
To value; to esteem. "We highly esteem and stand much upon our birth."
(c)
To insist on; to attach much importance to; as, to stand upon security; to stand upon ceremony.
(d)
To attack; to assault. (A Hebraism) "So I stood upon him, and slew him."
To stand with, to be consistent with. "It stands with reason that they should be rewarded liberally."






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








Advanced search
     Find words:
Starting with
Ending with
Containing
Matching a pattern  

Synonyms
Antonyms
Quotes
Words linked to  

only single words



Share |





"Stand" Quotes from Famous Books



... been the extent of my reading for upwards of sixteen months. It frets me to enter those rooms of my cottage in which the books stand. In one of them, to which my little boy has access, he has found out a use for some of them. Somebody has given him a bow and arrows—God knows who, certainly not I, for I have not energy or ingenuity to ...
— The Posthumous Works of Thomas De Quincey, Vol. 1 (2 vols) • Thomas De Quincey

... half his father's estate to a stranger staggered him; yet to his eternal credit, in that first instant of bewildered agony no thought of disregarding his father's wishes entered his mind. It was a hard wallop, but he'd got to stand it. ...
— By Advice of Counsel • Arthur Train

... by day and sleep by night. They eat in the open air, under the shade of the nearest tree. In each district there is a house erected for general use, much larger than common, some of them exceeding two hundred feet in length, thirty broad, and twenty high. The dwelling-houses all stand in the woody belt which surrounds the island, between the feet of the central mountains and the sea, each having a very small piece of ground cleared, just enough to keep the dropping of the trees from the thatch. An Otaheitan ...
— The Eventful History Of The Mutiny And Piratical Seizure - Of H.M.S. Bounty: Its Cause And Consequences • Sir John Barrow

... Henry Mayhew," writes Punch's ex-Printer, "the special joke-provider for Punch, was a most jocular character. He would stand beside the compositor while he was working at his case, and closely watch every movement of his hand in picking up each letter. He said he could not make out how ever the compositor could keep the alphabetical order of each box in his memory. So to master the mystery ...
— The History of "Punch" • M. H. Spielmann

... about here a bit," Driggs proposed, nodding to the engineer to stand by ready to stop or start ...
— The High School Boys' Canoe Club • H. Irving Hancock

... here sooner or later," said Mr. Bascom. "Some folks try stayin' away, but it ain't much use. You'll find the honourable Hilary doing business at the same old stand, next to the governor, in Number Seven up there." And Mr. Bascom pointed to the well-known window on ...
— The Crossing • Winston Churchill

... up your thread from right to left, over four horizontal and under four perpendicular threads, back over the four last threads, and draw it out beside the next cluster. The clusters, as they now stand, are bound together in the middle, three by three, with darning-stitches. The thread must be fastened in and cut off, after ...
— Encyclopedia of Needlework • Therese de Dillmont

... member of two or three Bohemian clubs in London, to which, as time went on, he became increasingly attached. At these, he passed as a good fellow, chiefly from a propensity to stand drinks to any and everyone upon any pretence; he was also renowned amongst his boon companions for his rendering of "The Village Blacksmith" in dumb show, a performance greeted by his thirsty audience with ...
— Sparrows - The Story of an Unprotected Girl • Horace W. C. Newte

... vicissitudes, were to become an important factor in the English religious movement of the eighteenth century: the Wesleyan movement. In spite of differences in their doctrines, the Moravian Brethren and the Hussites stand as a connecting ...
— A Literary History of the English People - From the Origins to the Renaissance • Jean Jules Jusserand

... scarcely remember a time when the image of Our lady did not stand up in my mind quite definitely, at the mention or the thought of all these things. I was quite distant from these things, and then doubtful about these things; and then disputing with the world for them, and with myself against them; for that ...
— Gilbert Keith Chesterton • Maisie Ward

... lucky for you," Sommers remarked good-humoredly, "that I was thick enough with the bloodsuckers to get you that letter from Hitchcock. One of us will have to stand in with the 'swilling, ...
— The Web of Life • Robert Herrick

... father a dog and a thief," cried Bigley fiercely, "and— and—I don't want to offend you, Captain Duncan, but I couldn't stand by and hear ...
— Devon Boys - A Tale of the North Shore • George Manville Fenn

... and capable business man stand to lose or gain by the coming of such a Socialist government?" he asks. "I submit that on the ...
— Socialism As It Is - A Survey of The World-Wide Revolutionary Movement • William English Walling

... that tramp in threes Through sumptuous Piccadilly, through The roaring Strand, and stand at ease At last 'neath shadowy Waterloo? Some gallant Guild, I ween, are they; ...
— Fly Leaves • C. S. Calverley

... year to turn against Great Britain on a mere question of commerce—did not hesitate again, in 1812, to face Great Britain in arms on a question of sea rights; and on account of this we expect all those of German-American descent to stand unreservedly by their adopted country,—forced into war by an autocracy that not only murdered our women and children in defiance of international law and common humanity but which threatens, if successful in this war, to invade ...
— Face to Face with Kaiserism • James W. Gerard

... original lectures, I have thought it desirable to publish the whole in the form of three separate works. Of these the first—or that which deals with the purely historical side of biological science—may be allowed to stand over for an indefinite time. The second is the one which is now brought out and which, as its sub-title signifies, is devoted to the general theory of organic evolution as this was left by the stupendous labours of Darwin. As soon as the translations shall have been ...
— Darwin, and After Darwin (Vol. 1 and 3, of 3) • George John Romanes

... the cruel wrong that I could even dream of against him to whom I have sworn my woman's faith. I am a child in your hands, Arthur, and in the face of the reproaching Providence above me, I feel—I feel that I am at your mercy. I feel that what you speak I must listen to; that should you bid me stand beside you at the altar, I should not have courage to refuse. I feel, oh God! Arthur, that I love you, and am betrothed to Harold. But you are strong—you have courage, will, the power to defy such weakness of the heart—and you will save me, ...
— Fort Lafayette or, Love and Secession • Benjamin Wood

... nights were clear and starlight, no dew was deposited, owing to the great dryness of the air. On one occasion, this drought was so great during the passage of a hot wind, that at night I observed the wet-bulb thermometer to stand 20.5 degrees below the temperature of the air, which was 66 degrees; this indicated a dew-point of 11.5 degrees, or 54.5 degrees below the air, and a saturation-point of 0.146; there being only 0.102 ...
— Himalayan Journals (Complete) • J. D. Hooker

... the struggle. When the workers are thus beaten in a strike, they are not convinced that their demands are unreasonable or unjust; they are simply beaten because their resources are too small to enable them to stand the struggle. ...
— Socialism - A Summary and Interpretation of Socialist Principles • John Spargo

... wrong, no matter how great, must fall before the determined assault of a man, no matter how weak, Thoreau found the reason for his action. The operation of the laws of God is like an incontrollable torrent. Nothing can stand before them; but the work of a single man may set the torrent in motion which will sweep away the ...
— The Story of the Innumerable Company, and Other Sketches • David Starr Jordan

... and high wages give us an aristocracy of talent, genius, skill, tact, or whatever you like to call it; but you are by no means to understand that any of these aristocracies, or better classes, stand prominently before their fellows socially, or, that one is run after in preference to another; nobody runs after anybody in ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, No. CCCXXIX. - March, 1843, Vol. LIII. • Various

... accept her or she will not stay. It is not enough that men should vote; it is not enough that they should be theoretically equal before the law. They must have liberty to avail themselves of the opportunities and means of life; they must stand on equal terms with reference to the bounties of nature. Either this, or Liberty withdraws her light! Either this, or darkness comes on, and the very forces that progress has evolved turn to powers that work destruction. This is the universal law. ...
— The Digger Movement in the Days of the Commonwealth • Lewis H. Berens

... reign of Nicephorus Phocas. An opinion so decisively pronounced by Niebuhr and favorably received by Hase, the learned editor of Leo Diaconus, commands respectful consideration. But the whole tone of the work appears to me altogether inconsistent with any period in which philosophy did not stand, as it were, on some ground of equality with Christianity. The doctrine of the Trinity is sarcastically introduced rather as the strange doctrine of a new religion, than the established tenet of a faith universally prevalent. The argument, ...
— The History of The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire - Volume 1 • Edward Gibbon

... see you stand together—you and your henchman," she said to Rozel, and moved on to the antechapel, the Court following. Standing still just inside the doorway, she motioned Buonespoir to come near. The pirate, unconfused, undismayed, with his wide blue ...
— The Judgment House • Gilbert Parker

... beech-trees cease to grow; I fly further towards the north than the stork. You shall see the vegetable mould pass over into rocky ground; see snug, neat towns, old churches and mansions, where all is good and comfortable, where the family stand in a circle around the table and say grace at meals, where the least of the children says a prayer, and, morning and evening, sings a psalm. I have heard it, I have seen it, when little, from my nest under ...
— Pictures of Sweden • Hans Christian Andersen

... about Sarah's consent to save his reputation. But Sarah never did anything of the kind, as her subsequent actions prove. It isn't human nature; it isn't wifely nature; and although Sarah was a little gay-hearted herself, she wasn't going to stand any such nonsense—to speak lightly—from Abraham, and when she discovered his intimacy with the hired girl she quietly called him into the tent, and in less than ten seconds she made his life a howling wilderness. ...
— Fair to Look Upon • Mary Belle Freeley

... himself the usher of the French Commissaries to the sofa, in front of which he had himself been standing. There he would have seated Hedouville and General Michel. Hedouville threw himself down willingly enough; but the newly arrived messenger chose to stand. ...
— The Hour and the Man - An Historical Romance • Harriet Martineau

... he asked. "If that hole wasn't made to allow a lever to be inserted, then tell me what it was made for. And here's even the place to stand while a man uses it! ...
— Daughter of the Sun - A Tale of Adventure • Jackson Gregory

... at all. Whereof it proceedeth that the vertuous are tossed and afflicted with so many miseries; and the vitious (vicious) and bad triumphe with so great prosperities. Contrarilie, others are of opinion that fate and destinie may well stand with the course of our actions: yet nothing at all depend of the planets or stars, but proceede from a connexion of naturall causes as from their beginning. And these graunt withall, that we have ...
— The Origins and Destiny of Imperial Britain - Nineteenth Century Europe • J. A. Cramb

... amongst thorny Acacia and the tufted Kulan, suggested pleasing visions to starving travellers, and for the first time after three days of hard riding, we saw the face of man. The shepherds, Mikahil of the Habr Awal tribe, all fled as we approached: at last one was bold enough to stand and deliver the news. My companions were refreshed by good reports: there had been few murders, and the sea-board was tolerably clear of our doughty enemies, the Ayyal Ahmed. We pricked over the undulating growth of parched grass, shaping our course for Jebel Almis, ...
— First footsteps in East Africa • Richard F. Burton

... can and will!" Callomb spoke with determination. "This isn't a time for quibbling. You've got work to do. We both have work to do. We can't stand on a matter of vainglorious pride, and let big issues of humanity go to pot. We haven't the right to spend men's lives in fighting each other, when we are the only two men in this entanglement who are in ...
— The Call of the Cumberlands • Charles Neville Buck

... sulphuric acid is added to a strong solution of potassium dichromate, and the liquid allowed to stand, deep red needle-shaped crystals appear which have the formula CrO{3}.This oxide of chromium is called chromic anhydride, since it combines readily with ...
— An Elementary Study of Chemistry • William McPherson

... and was holding Parson Christian's hand with a nervous grip. She stepped apart, and going behind the two men, she came to a stand between them. On the one side stood Drayton, with a smirking face half turned toward the spectators; on the other stood the convict, his hands bound before him, his defiant glance softened to a look of tenderness, and his lips parted with the unuttered cry that ...
— A Son of Hagar - A Romance of Our Time • Sir Hall Caine

... will agree with me that the sensation of the general shabbiness and duskiness of your whole appearance is so strong as to overcome all other considerations, not to mention your devotional feelings. In this attire you have to stand for a couple of hours amongst a perspiring and ill-tempered crowd, composed of tourists and priests, for the Italians are too wise to trouble themselves for such an object. During these two mortal hours you are pushed forward constantly ...
— Rome in 1860 • Edward Dicey

... byword and you'll be flat broke, a joke and an object of contempt the nation over. And it's not only yourself you've got to think of; you've got to consider your wife and daughter, and how they'll stand poverty and disgrace. Against all that you've got a chance, a fighting chance. Are you ...
— Hidden Gold • Wilder Anthony

... inheritance, and up to a period after the outbreak of the rebellion, and as an ardent admirer of our lamented president, the author of universal emancipation in America, I feel an enthusiastic interest in the success of the Freedmen's National Monument. I hope it may stand unequalled and unrivalled in grandeur and magnificence. It should be built essentially by freedmen, and should be emphatically national. Every dollar should come from the former slaves, every State should furnish a stone, and the monument ...
— The Black Phalanx - African American soldiers in the War of Independence, the - War of 1812, and the Civil War • Joseph T. Wilson

... ropes like Coristine. The subject of this reflection was quite happy in the bow, chumming with The Crew. Smoking their pipes together, Sylvanus confided to his apprentice that a sailor's life was the lonesomest life out of jail, when the cap'n was that quiet and stand off like as one he knowed that wasn't far away, nuther. Coristine sympathized with him. "The bossest time that ever was on this yere old Susan Thomas," he continued, "was last summer wonst when the cap'n's niece, she come along fer a ...
— Two Knapsacks - A Novel of Canadian Summer Life • John Campbell

... But situated as we are, we must move cautiously in this matter. If the Dost stops on our suggestion, and if (as is frequently the case with Orientals), the enemy, ascribing his moderation to weakness, presses him with increased vigour, what are we to do then? Are we to stand by and laugh at our dupe, telling him that though our advice got him into the scrape, he must find his own way out of it? or are we to set to work to check his opponents? and if we undertake the latter task, how far will it ...
— Letters and Journals of James, Eighth Earl of Elgin • James, Eighth Earl of Elgin

... reacheth from one to another, whereunto are fastened many burning lampes. These pillars of brasse were caused to be made by Sultan Soliman grandfather to Sultan Amurath now Emperor. After this, hauing entred with the difficultie abouesayd, there stand at the entrance two pillars of marble, to wit, on each side one. In the midst there are three of Aloes-wood not very thicke, and couered with tiles of India 1000. colours which serue to vnderproppe the Terratza. It is so darke, that they ...
— The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, - and Discoveries of The English Nation, Volume 9 - Asia, Part 2 • Richard Hakluyt

... the vale of years, the Dauphin not young, and the Duc de Bordeaux is but a child. Should any thing occur to this child, then would the Duc d'Orleans stand in direct line after the Dauphin. I thought of this contingency last night as I looked on the happy family, and felt assured that were the Duc d'Orleans called to reign in France, these same faces would look less cloudless than ...
— The Idler in France • Marguerite Gardiner

... more deserving of her sympathy than the Slovaks. Unless our statesmen renounce that principle of nationality which they have so loudly proclaimed, the Slovaks cannot be abandoned to their fate; for they form an essential part of the Bohemian problem. Without them the new kingdom could not stand alone, isolated as it would be among hostile or indifferent neighbours. In every way the Slovak districts form the natural continuation of Bohemia and are the necessary link between it and Russia, upon whose moral support the new State must rely ...
— The War and Democracy • R.W. Seton-Watson, J. Dover Wilson, Alfred E. Zimmern,

... and commercial relations with Austria, Prussia, Sweden, and Denmark stand on the usual favorable bases. One of the articles of our treaty with Russia in relation to the trade on the northwest coast of America having expired, instructions have been given to our minister at St. Petersburg to negotiate a renewal of it. The long and unbroken amity between ...
— A Compilation of the Messages and Papers of the Presidents - Section 1 (of 2) of Volume 3: Andrew Jackson (Second Term) • James D. Richardson

... PATRICK MACGILL'S The Red Horizon (JENKINS). Here we meet the author of The Children of the Dead End and The Rat Pit as Rifleman 3008 of the London Irish, involved in the grim routine of the firing line—reliefs, diggings and repairs, sentry-go's, stand-to's, reserves, working and covering parties, billets; and so da capo. With a rare artistic intuition, instead of diffusing his effects in a riot of general impressions, he has confined himself to a record of the doings of his section, ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 150, February 16, 1916 • Various

... to make a shuttlecock. They put eagle's feathers in his hair, and the old men adopted him into their tribe. On the third day the absent Indians returned with a stork. It was a white stork with a red bill and plenty of stork's neck, but short legs. Nanking doubted if it could stand on one leg on the top of a chimney and feed worms around to the young stork family, but he felt very proud and happy. The whole tribe seemed to have assembled to see Nanking go away. He had become the friend of all the boys and women and the protege ...
— Tales of the Chesapeake • George Alfred Townsend

... monitions of our own unfathomed greatness also stir within us? Yes: "the sense of Existence, the ideas of Right and Duty, awful intuitions of God and immortality, these, the grand facts and substance of the spirit, are independent and indestructible. The bases of the Moral Law, they shall stand in every tittle, although the stars should pass away. For their relations and root are in that which upholds the stars, even with worlds unseen from the finite, whose majestic and everlasting arrangements ...
— The Destiny of the Soul - A Critical History of the Doctrine of a Future Life • William Rounseville Alger

... think I won't get it out, if I have to pack it out in a canteen," said Roger. "High treason, arson, murder are nothing to stand between me and that cache ...
— The Forbidden Trail • Honore Willsie

... that Bayne Trevors's name was casually mentioned, suggested: "Why not go to the law?" For to them it was very clear that, once in the courts, the man who had played safe would laugh at them. Against Judith's oath that he had kidnapped her would stand Trevors's word that he had done nothing of the kind, coupled with his carefully established perjured alibi and the lying testimony of the physician who had visited Judith in the cave. This man and that might be rounded up, ...
— Judith of Blue Lake Ranch • Jackson Gregory

... have put your letter before me, and am going to answer it. Hold your tongue: stand by. Your weather and ours were not alike; we had not a bit of hot weather in June, yet you complain of it on the 19th day. What, you used to love hot weather then? I could never endure it: I detest and abominate it. I would not live in a hot country, to ...
— The Journal to Stella • Jonathan Swift

... princely deportment. For hours together he would lie watching those two wonderfully contrasted beings. Petulant and malicious as Cudjo appeared, he was completely under the control of his noble companion, who would often stand looking down at his tricks and deformity, with composedly folded arms and an air of patient indulgence and compassion beautiful ...
— Cudjo's Cave • J. T. Trowbridge

... teaspoonful to one pint of water). After the bath apply a thin coating of white vaseline to the nipples. It may be necessary to resort to the following mixture to harden the nipples and to make them stand out so that the child can get them in its mouth: Alcohol and water, equal parts into which put a pinch of powdered alum; this mixture should be put in a saucer and the nipples gently massaged with it twice daily. A depressed nipple ...
— The Eugenic Marriage, Volume I. (of IV.) - A Personal Guide to the New Science of Better Living and Better Babies • W. Grant Hague, M.D.

... rose from his seat, and leaning on the shoulder of the Prince of Orange, because he was unable to stand without support, he addressed himself to the audience, and from a paper which he held in his hand, in order to assist his memory, he recounted with dignity, but without ostentation, all the great things which he had undertaken and performed since the commencement ...
— The Great Events by Famous Historians, Volume 9 • Various

... and West is West, and never the twain shall meet, Till Earth and Sky stand presently at God's great Judgment Seat; But there is neither East nor West, Border, nor Breed, nor 5 Birth, When two strong men stand face to face, though they come from the ends ...
— Story Hour Readings: Seventh Year • E.C. Hartwell

... wear red head-bands; those who have the west goal should wear yellow head-bands. An Umpire must be selected. The ball must strike one of the goal posts to make a point; the number of points that shall constitute the game should be agreed upon. Two players, one from each side, stand near each goal. One helps the ball for his side; the other hinders the ball when near the goal by tossing it back into the field again so that his side may ...
— Indian Games and Dances with Native Songs • Alice C. Fletcher

... ye'll but stand to what ye've said, I'se gang wi' you, my shepherd lad, And ye may row me in your plaid, And I shall be ...
— The Modern Scottish Minstrel, Volume IV. - The Songs of Scotland of the Past Half Century • Various

... praeceptorum. His self-sacrifice was not in vain. The tactics of Fabius were again adopted after his death. 15. et vixisse adhuc et mori died as he had ever lived. —D. 17. reus iterum e consulatu a second time to stand on my defence in consequence of my consulship, i.e. on a charge that grew out of his acts as Consul (219 B.C.) with M. Livius Salinator of misappropriation of the spoils at the close of the Illyrian War. 18-19. ut ... protegam. The two Consuls had the chief command of the army on alternate days. ...
— Helps to Latin Translation at Sight • Edmund Luce

... has to contend sharply with the birds and bears to obtain his share—was now beginning to ripen. As he was entering this open space, which appeared to extend some distance round the point of a screening knoll, he was suddenly brought to a stand by a noise somewhere in the bushes or woods ahead, such as had never before saluted his ears. It was like nothing else, or if any thing else, like the wild snorting of a frightened horse prolonged into the dying note of the ...
— Gaut Gurley • D. P. Thompson

... his way to the top rung of the ladder of social prestige. It has permitted freedom to profess and practise any religion, and to advocate the most bizarre ideas in ethics and philosophy. It has brought human individuals to the place where they feel that nothing may be permitted to stand between them and the satisfaction of personal desire. The disciples of Nietzsche do not hesitate to stand boldly for the principle that might makes right, that he who can crush his competitors in the race for pleasure and profit has an indisputable claim on whatever he can ...
— Society - Its Origin and Development • Henry Kalloch Rowe

... had slipped his dark slide into his pocket, and was unscrewing his camera from its stand. Dr. ...
— General John Regan - 1913 • George A. Birmingham

... occupations of the people give form and character to institutions and legislation. The centralized and despotic Bourbon monarchy of France was an anachronism among an intelligent people. So was every institution emanating from and dependent upon it. It was impossible for the structure to stand indefinitely, however tenderly it was treated, however cleverly it was propped and repaired. As in the case of England in 1688 and of her colonies in 1772, the immediate and direct agency in the crash was a matter of money. But the analogy ...
— The Life of Napoleon Bonaparte - Vol. I. (of IV.) • William Milligan Sloane

... being led so far into the woods. I was about to order both Indians back to the tent, when Little Fellow, with face pricked forward and foot raised, as if he feared to set it down—for the fourth time came to a dead stand. Now, I, too, heard a rustle, and saw a vague sinuous movement distinctly running abreast of us among the ferns. For a moment, when we stopped, it ceased, then wiggled forward like beast, or serpent in the underbrush. Little Fellow ...
— Lords of the North • A. C. Laut

... delight at Simeon's ringing points: which were, to Dartrey's mind, vacuously clever and crafty. Dartrey despised effects of oratory, save when soldiers had to be hurled on a mark—or citizens nerved to stand for ...
— The Shaving of Shagpat • George Meredith

... money to carry on the affairs of the nation continued to grow so irksome that Chamillart, who had both the finance and the war departments under his control, was unable to stand against the increased trouble and vexation which this state of things brought him. More than once he had represented that this double work was too much for him. But the King had in former times expressed so much ...
— The Memoirs of Louis XIV., His Court and The Regency, Complete • Duc de Saint-Simon

... on, and our unhappy prisoner, at the hour of eleven o'clock, was placed at the bar of his country to stand the brunt of a government prosecution. Common report had already carried abroad the story of Una's love and his, many interesting accounts of which had got into the papers of the day. When he stood forward, therefore, all eyes were eagerly riveted ...
— Fardorougha, The Miser - The Works of William Carleton, Volume One • William Carleton

... muessen so freundlich sein, und verzeih mich die interlarding von ein oder zwei Englischer Worte, hie und da, denn ich finde dass die deutsche is not a very copious language, and so when you've really got anything to say, you've got to draw on a language that can stand the strain. ...
— Innocents abroad • Mark Twain

... have to fight," said Billy with bloodthirsty determination. "I for one am not going to stand calmly by and have my throat cut, or worse still be taken prisoner by ...
— The Boy Aviators in Africa • Captain Wilbur Lawton

... well know that I must look upon myself as worsted in the fight. Isidore Beautrelet has got the better of Arsene Lupin. My plans are upset. What I tried to leave in the dark you have brought into the full light of day. You annoy me, you stand in my way. Well, I've had enough of it—Bredoux told you so to no purpose. I now tell you so again; and I insist upon it, so that you may take it to heart: I've ...
— The Hollow Needle • Maurice Leblanc

... viands, distant and attractive in like measure, a free man would die of hunger, before he would bring one of them to his teeth. Thus a lamb would stand between two ravenings of fierce wolves, fearing equally; thus would stand a dog between two does. Hence if, urged by my doubts in like measure, I was silent, I blame not myself; nor, since it ...
— The Divine Comedy, Volume 3, Paradise [Paradiso] • Dante Alighieri

... supposed they were just preparing for battle, and was saving our men for the conflict. Their hosts crown the hill and plain beyond the river, and their numbers to me are unknown. Still I felt the confidence we could stand the shock, and was anxious for the blow that is to fall on some point, and was prepared to meet it here. Yesterday evening I had my suspicions that they might return during the night, but could not believe they would relinquish their hopes after all their boasting and preparation, ...
— Recollections and Letters of General Robert E. Lee • Captain Robert E. Lee, His Son

... had the influence, which I haven't," he began, "it isn't a matter of the Government at all. The country would never stand it." ...
— The Kingdom of the Blind • E. Phillips Oppenheim

... too dark to count, but we seem to muster pretty strong, all things considered. We'll soon have you clear, sir. Now then, Bill, you stand by to haul Mr Lascelles out of the thick of these bights and turns whilst I holds 'em up. Now then—haul! Is ...
— The Rover's Secret - A Tale of the Pirate Cays and Lagoons of Cuba • Harry Collingwood

... of the world of spirits has received a different kind of material nature in proportion to his degree of removal from the Creator. The highest spirits, who have virtually held fast by that which is good, though they too stand in need of restitution, guide the world, are servants of God ([Greek: angeloi]), and have bodies of an exceedingly subtle kind in the form of a globe (stars). The spirits that have fallen very deeply (the spirits of men) are banished ...
— History of Dogma, Volume 2 (of 7) • Adolph Harnack

... the other. 'Damme, I wish I could say the same. I am as regularly over head and ears as the Royal George, and stand about as much chance of being bailed out. ...
— Sketches by Boz - illustrative of everyday life and every-day people • Charles Dickens

... well-defined, and carefully studied, sequence of belief and practice, when each and all form part of a well-recognized body of tradition the descent of which has been abundantly demonstrated, then I submit such parallels stand on a sound basis, and it is not unreasonable to conclude that the body of tradition containing them belongs to the same family and is to be interpreted on the same principles as the closely analogous rites ...
— From Ritual to Romance • Jessie L. Weston

... to stand as it was originally written since it does not profess to rest on my own knowledge, and only offers a suggestion on good authority. Recent experience seems, however, to show that in all great administrative departments there ought to ...
— The English Constitution • Walter Bagehot

... Medals. Unfortunately, however, for Dall, the Regulating Officer thought proper to disregard these documents, as, according to the strict and literal interpretation of the Admiralty regulations, a seaman does not stand protected unless he is actually on board of his ship, or in a boat belonging to her, or has the Admiralty protection in his possession. This order of the Board, however, cannot be rigidly followed in practice; and therefore, when the matter is satisfactorily stated to the ...
— Records of a Family of Engineers • Robert Louis Stevenson

... had not liberty to indulge her feelings, but only to obey Rodin's implacable orders, she hastily closed both trunk and wardrobe, and leaving the dressing-room, returned into the bed-chamber. After having again examined the writing-stand, a sudden idea occurred to her. Not content with once more searching the cardboard boxes, she drew out one of them from the pigeon-hole, hoping to find what she sought behind the box: her first attempt failed, but the second was more successful. She ...
— The Wandering Jew, Complete • Eugene Sue

... it down now. Thanks very much, old chap" (to me). "I'll tell Kitty that you've let us. We can jab it off its hook with a billiard-cue, I should think, Moke. Come too, will you, Mr Fordyce? You can stand underneath and catch it, in case it comes down with a run. ...
— The Right Stuff - Some Episodes in the Career of a North Briton • Ian Hay

... co'se—you see?—nobody cann' stand that! Firzt to find his way out of that is Melanie. Melanie's confessor he think tha'z a sin to keep any longer those fact' from her mother, and she confezz them to Mme. Alexandre, and ad the end she say: 'Mamma, in our li'l' coterie I ...
— The Flower of the Chapdelaines • George W. Cable

... received corroboration touching all these points from a gentleman who, when walking alone and unarmed on the skirts of a forest, was greatly alarmed by a large puma coming out to meet him. Deeming it best not to stand, he advanced to meet the animal, which thereupon began to gambol around his feet and rub against his legs, after the manner of an affectionate cat. At first he thought these movements must have been preliminary to ...
— The Naturalist in La Plata • W. H. Hudson

... Conscience, say: "We are so sad, dear Conscience! for we would Most gladly do what to thee seemeth good; But lo! this rock! we cannot climb it, so Thou must point out some other way to go." Yet secretly we are rejoicing: and, When right before our faces, as we stand In seeming grief, the rock is cleft in twain, Leaving the pathway clear, we shrink in pain, And, loth to go, by every act reveal What we so tried from Conscience ...
— Maurine and Other Poems • Ella Wheeler Wilcox

... again, and are driven before the storm, the very arts they had created, the structures they had raised, the usages they had established, are swept away; 'in that very day their thoughts perish.' The portion they had reclaimed from the young earth's ruggedness is lost; and failing to stand fast against man, they finally get embroiled with nature, and are thrust down beneath her ever-living hand .-Martineau's Sermon, "The ...
— The Earth as Modified by Human Action • George P. Marsh

... ask no help," said Lew Hervey, but his voice was husky and uneven. "I'll stand my ground with any man, ...
— Alcatraz • Max Brand

... made, and abound with words standing for such combinations, an usual way of GETTING these complex ideas is, by the explication of those terms that stand for them. For, consisting of a company of simple ideas combined, they may, by words standing for those simple ideas, be represented to the mind of one who understands those words, though that complex combination ...
— An Essay Concerning Humane Understanding, Volume I. - MDCXC, Based on the 2nd Edition, Books I. and II. (of 4) • John Locke

... shrunken figure, what with his meager naked legs and his ashen eager face and thin dust-colored throat rising above the collarless neckband of the garment. He blew out the flame of the oil lamp which burned on a reading stand at the left side of his bed and extinguished the two candles which stood on a ...
— Sundry Accounts • Irvin S. Cobb

... under all sail towards the rocks. The old pilot took his stand in the weather-rigging. The helmsman's eye was upon him, ready to answer each wave of his hand, or deep-toned sound of his voice. The guns were deserted, and all the crew stood by either the tacks or sheets or braces, or crowded ...
— True Blue • W.H.G. Kingston

... trickle out before she begins. Good-night, sir," said Doctor Prance, who by this time had begun to appear to Ransom more susceptible of domestication, as if she had been a small forest-creature, a catamount or a ruffled doe, that had learned to stand still while you stroked it, or even to extend a paw. She ministered to health, and she was healthy herself; if his cousin could have been even of this type Basil would have ...
— The Bostonians, Vol. I (of II) • Henry James

... have gone the other way, but the enchanted moccasins kept hurrying him forward. "Stand off, will you?" cried ...
— The Indian Fairy Book - From the Original Legends • Cornelius Mathews

... various accomplishments. At the first lesson he taught her to stand and walk on her hind legs, which she liked extremely. At the second lesson she had to jump on her hind legs and catch some sugar, which her teacher held high above her head. After that, in the following lessons she danced, ran tied to a cord, howled to music, rang the bell, ...
— The Cook's Wedding and Other Stories • Anton Chekhov

... his soul's resurrection.' The extortion of that confirmation of his calumnies had been a main object of the whole disgraceful farce. When he had thus bought his worthless life, the Sheriff brought back upon the scaffold Grey and Markham to stand beside him. All three were asked if their offences were not heinous, and if they had not been justly tried and lawfully condemned. Each answered affirmatively. Then said the Sheriff: 'See the mercy of your Prince, who of himself hath sent hither a countermand, and hath given you ...
— Sir Walter Ralegh - A Biography • William Stebbing

... that the Queen's habit was to stand conversing with the ladies till the gentlemen joined them, and that knowing her practice, the dining-room was soon left empty. Lord Campbell gives his experience of this portion of a royal dinner some years after the Queen's ...
— Life of Her Most Gracious Majesty the Queen V.1. • Sarah Tytler

... the botanist, "I am not going to stand up for the classics, as you are well aware. Although I have taught you a little of their lore, it was when I had nothing to do, and you were equally idle; otherwise I should have considered that both of us were wasting time. You already know my opinions on that subject—which ...
— The Cliff Climbers - A Sequel to "The Plant Hunters" • Captain Mayne Reid

... lately sent two judges of their Council here to ascertain definitively how things stand. I repeated my complaints. I spoke to them about the reception given to Monsieur. Should it be your plan to extract five or six millions from Venice, I have expressly prepared this sort of rupture for you. If your intentions be ...
— Memoirs of Napoleon Bonaparte, Complete • Louis Antoine Fauvelet de Bourrienne

... chains, and between two of these cranes the intendant pointed out an indescribable mass of something supposed to be a stag roasted whole—not at present a very toothsome-looking morsel. Dozens of pots and kettles hang from the chains, and scores of pans and ovens stand in rows underneath. Thickly scattered over the floor near these fireplaces are the bones of game and poultry, probably dragged there by rats, though we did not encounter rat or mouse or any living thing within the walls, ...
— Lippincott's Magazine, Vol. 20, August 1877 • Various

... don't much care,' answered he. 'Life is really too grim earnest in these days to stand on ceremony. I am sick of blind leaders of the blind, of respectable preachers to the respectable, who drawl out second-hand trivialities, which they neither practise nor wish to see practised. I've had enough ...
— Yeast: A Problem • Charles Kingsley

... any material that was not permanent:) and with that you would associate your school of chemistry, which should teach what was permanent and what was not; which school of chemistry should declare authoritatively, with the Academy's seal, what colors would stand and what process would secure their standing: and should have a sort of Apothecaries' Hall where anybody who required them could procure colors in the purest state; all these things being organized in one great system, and only possibly ...
— On the Old Road, Vol. 2 (of 2) - A Collection of Miscellaneous Essays and Articles on Art and Literature • John Ruskin

... ever desire to enjoy peace and security in Sweden stand by me this day and cling one to another. I shall do my part. I fear not the king nor his Danes and mercenaries, but gladly venture life and blood and all that I possess on the event of this battle. If you will do the ...
— Historical Tales, Vol. 9 (of 15) - The Romance of Reality. Scandinavian. • Charles Morris

... the ground seems to be packed with people. Glorious weather has allured everybody. Stand after stand is filled up. The colour becomes kaleidoscopic. The Rev. Septimus, during the brief interval of an over, allows his eyes to stray round the huge circle. Upon the ground are the youth, the beauty, the rank and fashion of the kingdom, and, best of all, his old friends. The ...
— The Hill - A Romance of Friendship • Horace Annesley Vachell

... shut some gates after me, and now and then to stand still while the cattle that were lying in the banked-up pathway arose and blundered down among the grass and reeds. But after a little while I seemed to have ...
— Great Expectations • Charles Dickens

... Matty at her stand without the florist's shop was out of harm's way; but no sooner did the clatter of the approaching steamer strike her ear, than she hastily rose from her seat, and started to meet Tony, who, pausing with boyish interest to watch the engine as it came up the cross street, did not ...
— Uncle Rutherford's Nieces - A Story for Girls • Joanna H. Mathews

... single feature. But the wan ghost in the corner lifted its head to look at her, and slowly brightened as to something worthy a spirit's love, and a dim phantom's smiles. Now then, Dr. Renton! the lines are drawn, and the foe is coming. Be martial, sir, as when you stand in the ranks of the Cadets on training-days! Steady, and stand the charge! So he did. He kept an inflexible front as she glided toward him, softly, slowly, with her bright eyes smiling into his, and doing dreadful execution. ...
— Little Classics, Volume 8 (of 18) - Mystery • Various

... Otter-Spears to watch his Vents, and good Otter-Hounds, beat both sides of the River's Banks, and you'll soon find if there is any. If you find him, and perceive where he swims under Water, get to stand before him when he Vents, (i.e. takes breath) and endeavour to strike him with the Spear: If you miss him, follow him with your Hound, and if they are good for Otter, they will certainly beat every Tree ...
— The School of Recreation (1696 edition) • Robert Howlett

... pamphlets stitched in blue paper. These had not as yet arrived to the importance of a dinner invitation, but were invited occasionally to pass the evening "in a friendly way." They were very respectful to the partners, and indeed seemed to stand a little in awe of them; but they paid very devoted court to the lady of the house, and were extravagantly fond of the children. I looked round for the poor devil author in the rusty black coat and magnificent frill, but he ...
— Tales of a Traveller • Washington Irving

... the stone. A warm thrill runs through me, and I feel, as I have done in the woods so many times before, that someone has just been here, and has stepped to one side. Someone is with me here, and a moment later I see his back disappearing into the woods. "It is God," I think. There I stand, neither speaking nor singing. I only see. I feel all my face being filled with the sight. "It ...
— Look Back on Happiness • Knut Hamsun

... impossible,' he cried to himself. 'The multiplication tables have gone wrong. The City has driven me mad. No shareholder would stand such a ...
— A Prisoner in Fairyland • Algernon Blackwood

... those to whom they had vowed, was fought that memorable battle, the like of which was never known before or since, when to aid the cause, the laws of Nature were suspended upon human intercession—when Joshua said, "Sun, stand thou still upon Gibeon, and thou, moon, in the valley of Ajalon." "So the sun stood still in the midst of heaven, and hasted not to go down about ...
— Mrs Whittelsey's Magazine for Mothers and Daughters - Volume 3 • Various

... the little fellow could stand, and he suddenly fled from the room, still crying; then we all laughed, and the angry editor laughed too, proud of the ...
— Far Away and Long Ago • W. H. Hudson

... a little below us there, on the other side of the mountain, they do say as the murder was done by the woman's husband, as she had run away from; but they are a set of poor ignorant folks out there! Now it stand to reason, sir, it couldn't have been done by him, and it must have been done by some member of that band of burglars that they say is lurking ...
— Cruel As The Grave • Mrs. Emma D. E. N. Southworth

... that theology cannot be mathematically demonstrated, but that its integrity and worth depend solely upon historical testimony. Does the Christian system have the authority of history for its defence? If so, it will stand the test of universal opposition; but, if not, it will fall of its own weight. The tendency of his deductions was negative, and hence we rank him as no ordinary agent toward the growth of historic ...
— History of Rationalism Embracing a Survey of the Present State of Protestant Theology • John F. Hurst

... nothing of it. Once, I remember, it struck me queer that he wasn't working so hard as he had used to. Still earliest of all and latest of all, he would sometimes leave his iron cooling on the board now and stand for minutes of the precious day, dreaming out of the harbor window. When the sun was sinking, the shaft through the window bathed his head and his lean neck with a quality almost barbaric, and for a ...
— The Best Short Stories of 1917 - and the Yearbook of the American Short Story • Various

... just the opposite flight from clear tonality, as if painting took to a Japanese manner, sans aught of locality. Where an easy half-step leads gently somewhere, a whole tone sings instead. Nothing obvious may stand. ...
— Symphonies and Their Meaning; Third Series, Modern Symphonies • Philip H. Goepp

... had left Rouen:—"First I thought that I could stay," she said; "I had my house full of provisions, and I preferred to feed a few soldiers then expatriate myself and go God knows where. But when I saw them, the Prussians, it was too much for me, I could not stand it. They made my blood boil with rage; and I wept all day for very shame. Then some were billeted to my house; I flew at the throat of the first one who entered. And I would have fixed that one, if they had not pulled me away by the hair. After that, I had to hide. Finally I found ...
— Mademoiselle Fifi • Guy de Maupassant

... poorly at Norwich, my dearest Hal, in body and estate, having a wretched influenza, sore throat, sore chest, and cold in my head, through which I am obliged to stand bare-necked and bare-armed, bare-headed and almost bare-footed (for the thin silk stockings and satin shoes are a poor protection), on the stage, to houses, I am sorry to say, as thin as my stockings; so that the money return for all this fatigue, discomfort, and expense ...
— Records of Later Life • Frances Anne Kemble

... lower kind of ship-painting, it is always matter of wonder to me that it satisfies sailors. Some years ago I happened to stand longer than pleased my pensioner guide before Turner's "Battle of Trafalgar," at Greenwich Hospital; a picture which, at a moderate estimate, is simply worth all the rest of the hospital—ground—walls—pictures and models put together. My guide, supposing me to be detained ...
— The Harbours of England • John Ruskin

... until we decided it was too late to go to bed, and we went for a ride instead. Whether we ever came to any conclusion—that's another matter. Still, it's the arguing that counts. It's things like that that stand out in life. Nothing's been quite so vivid since. It's the philosophers, it's the scholars," he continued, "they're the people who pass the torch, who keep the light burning by which we live. Being a politician doesn't necessarily blind one to that, ...
— The Voyage Out • Virginia Woolf

... Henry VIII, so with this daughter of his, scrupulous legality of form marked the most revolutionary acts. Elizabeth had been proclaimed "Queen of England, France and Ireland, Defender of the Faith &c," this "&c" being chosen to stand in place of the old title "Supreme Head of the Church," thus dodging the question of its assumption or omission. Parliament, however, very soon passed supremacy and uniformity acts to supply the needed sanction. The former repealed Philip and Mary's Heresy Act and Repealing Statute, ...
— The Age of the Reformation • Preserved Smith

... upon them with their rockets, while Sir Charles Staveley moved the infantry of his brigade down to the plain, the Snider rifles keeping up a fire against which the Abyssinians could not for a moment stand. Unable to get within range themselves, they were mown down in lines. Their old general, Fitaurari Gabriye, led them on again and again, but he soon fell, shot through the head; and night coming on, the shattered remnant retired towards the Fala saddle, still shouting ...
— Our Soldiers - Gallant Deeds of the British Army during Victoria's Reign • W.H.G. Kingston

... other repeated in great surprise. "For the Lord's sake, Mr. John—only one? Why, there ain't any one man between here and Lunnon town could stand up to you, sir, ...
— The Bittermeads Mystery • E. R. Punshon

... impressed with the desire to write to you to see if I could not get relief. I am the mother of two children and have never had any weakness of any kind until the past year. I am pregnant at present, my back pains me nearly all the time and left side of abdomen. My back pains so sometimes I cannot stand on my feet or straighten up. My appetite is poor and my friends tell me I look badly. I hope that you will be able to give me ...
— Treatise on the Diseases of Women • Lydia E. Pinkham

... inebriated digger came out with vociferous welcome and insisted on our going in and drinking at his expense. In the bar was a man I knew; seeing him had the effect of making me feel more or less at home. We sat and rested for a few moments; then I got hold of the idea that we were expected to stand return treat to our host and his friends. In this I was, as it happened, quite mistaken. Joe had no money whatever, so I had to pay. My capital was ...
— Reminiscences of a South African Pioneer • W. C. Scully

... authour of it[934]: 'there is in it such a vigour of mind, such a swarm of thoughts, so much of nature, and art, and life[935].' I wondered to hear him say of Gulliver's Travels, 'When once you have thought of big men and little men, it is very easy to do all the rest.' I endeavoured to make a stand for Swift, and tried to rouse those who were much more able to defend him; but in vain. Johnson at last, of his own accord, allowed very great merit to the inventory of articles found in the pocket of the Man Mountain, particularly ...
— Life Of Johnson, Vol. 2 • Boswell

... holy. Amidst all that humbles and scathes; amidst all that shatters from their life its verdure, smites to the dust the pomp and summit of their pride, and in the very heart of existence writeth a sudden and "strange defeature,"—they stand erect,—riven, not uprooted,—a monument less of pity than of awe! There are some who pass through the Lazar-House of Misery with a step more august than a Caesar's in his hall. The very things which, seen alone, are despicable and vile, associated ...
— The Disowned, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... dead, and his army is destroyed! They made a brave stand, even after they were defeated at the village. They might have got away had anybody but Jackson been pursuing. But he gave them no chance. They were enveloped by cavalry and infantry, and only ...
— The Scouts of Stonewall • Joseph A. Altsheler

... anybody," returned Malcourt sincerely, removing his driving-gloves and shaking off his wet box-coat. "Why, I can scarcely stand them ...
— The Firing Line • Robert W. Chambers

... the responsibility of stand-offishness on the poorer Betsy, the Montmorenci would launch into recollections of those good old "Peace be upon him" times till the grub forgot the splendors of the caterpillar in a joyous resurrection of ancient scandals. ...
— Children of the Ghetto • I. Zangwill

... They had sent for a special chef, M. Alexandre. As soon as he came he did just as he pleased in the house. He bossed every one, even the proprietor and his wife, as if he had been a king. He was a big handsome man, who did not seem fitted to stand beside a kitchen range. He was always calling out, 'Come, some butter —some eggs—some Madeira!' And it had to be brought to him at once in a hurry, or he would get cross and say things that would make us ...
— Maupassant Original Short Stories (180), Complete • Guy de Maupassant

... river, but I am coming back again. Once more I push away the long grass and the swinging boughs, and look into your face. Again I dabble my bare feet, and scoop up my straw hat full, and watch the tiny streams run down. Again I stand, bare and small and trembling, wondering if I can swim across. And—listen, little river—again at the same old place I shall cut me the willow wand, and down the long slope to the certain place I knew I am going to hurry, running the last quarter of a mile in sheer expectation, but ...
— The Singing Mouse Stories • Emerson Hough

... with an anchor on each side. The victim, as well as the rest of the performers, should be costumed in sailors' suits, differing in colors and styles. In the centre of the stage erect a small platform, one foot high and six feet long. On this place the person who is to be shaved. At his left stand two sailors. One holds the speaking trumpet and a ship's bucket; the other is in the act of pouring a bucket of water on the head of the victim; a third sailor holds in his left hand a paint brush, and brandishes the razor in his right; a little sailor boy holds a small tub, which ...
— Home Pastimes; or Tableaux Vivants • James H. Head

... "that in these simple forms one sees people that one is acquainted with; one has met with just such things in the societies amongst which one has lived; and the strangest likenesses of all with these soulless creatures are in the masses in which men stand divided one against the other, in their classes and professions; the nobility and the third estate, for instance, ...
— The German Classics of The Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, Vol. II • Editor-in-Chief: Kuno Francke

... Remaliah. Because Syria, Ephraim, and the son of Remaliah, have taken evil counsel against thee, saying, Let us go up against Judah, and vex it, and let us make a breach therein for us, and set a king in the midst of it, even the son of Tabeal: Thus saith the Lord God, It shall not stand, neither shall it come ...
— Myths of Babylonia and Assyria • Donald A. Mackenzie

... window niche, How statue-like I see thee stand, The agate lamp within thy hand! Ah, Psyche from the regions which Are ...
— The Pretty Lady • Arnold E. Bennett

... these words, he again looked at the people, and was silent. "There they stand," said he to his heart; "there they laugh: they understand me not; I am not the mouth ...
— Thus Spake Zarathustra - A Book for All and None • Friedrich Nietzsche

... instead of appearing flat like a disc, already showed her convexity. If the sun's rays had reached her obliquely the shadow then thrown would have made the high mountains stand out. They could have seen the gaping craters and the capricious furrows that cut up the immense plains. But all relief was levelled in the intense brilliancy. Those large spots that give the appearance of a human face to the moon ...
— The Moon-Voyage • Jules Verne

... which, after a rapid descent, loses itself at the bottom of the valley in dark masses of thickets stocked with deer. Beyond these thickets, on the other side of the Seine, the blue slated roofs of Meudon, and the waving tops of the majestic trees of its park, stand out in the blue summer sky. We often came to sit on this hill, which has all the elevation of a promontory, the silence and shade of a valley, and the solitude of a desert. The lungs play freer there; the ...
— Raphael - Pages Of The Book Of Life At Twenty • Alphonse de Lamartine

... appearance issuing from it; they used it for their advancement; and the sharp contrast of their conduct with the holy state makes them appear altogether fiendish. The Borgias are a satire on a great form or phase of religion, debasing and destroying it. They stand on high pedestals, and from their presence radiates the light of the Christian ideal. In this form we behold and recognize them. We view their acts through a medium which is permeated with religious ideas. Without this, and placed on a purely secular stage, the Borgias would ...
— Lucretia Borgia - According to Original Documents and Correspondence of Her Day • Ferdinand Gregorovius

... and copper sky, The bloody Sun, at noon, Right up above the mast did stand, No bigger than ...
— Coleridge's Ancient Mariner and Select Poems • Samuel Taylor Coleridge



Words linked to "Stand" :   tiered seat, stand watch, stand-alone, permit, stand back, oppose, resist, uprise, stadium, get up, flora, yield, accept, taxistand, sit out, ballpark, standing, defensive measure, dress rack, halt, bandstand, stall, cabstand, covered stand, service, stand up, defense, standard, stand for, stand guard, fend, lay, live with, pass judgment, sit, fight back, bear up, stopover, stand in, stay, lie, let, stand still, withstand, be, suffer, continue, magazine rack, wash-hand stand, point of view, endure, lectern, bowl, music rack, take the stand, fight down, stand pat, spice rack, coat stand, vegetation, rest, stand out, standoff, pay, array, swallow, standpoint, outdoor stage, align, music stand, brook, queue up, cityscape, repulsion, measure, stand-in, countenance, wash, put up, posture, allow, viewpoint, reading desk, ramp, staddle, stand sentinel, reviewing stand, evaluate, witness stand, rise, digest, botany, table, spit, take a joke, rack, take a firm stand, queue, defence, standstill, line up, stick out, place upright, cruet-stand, stance, booth, complexion, park, stand-up, arise, layover, grandstand, stand by, bear, animal husbandry, set, one-night stand, bier, take lying down, newsstand, standee, landscape, abide, stomach, sales booth, stand-down, bleachers, hold out



Copyright © 2020 Dictonary.net