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Roam   Listen
noun
Roam  n.  The act of roaming; a wandering; a ramble; as, he began his roam o'er hill and dale.






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Roam" Quotes from Famous Books



... expressed surprise; The needles opened their well-drilled eyes, The penknives felt shut up, no doubt; The scissors declared themselves cut out. The kettles, they boiled with rage, 'tis said; While every nail went off its head And hither and thither began to roam, Till a hammer came ...
— The Motor Maids in Fair Japan • Katherine Stokes

... before they were chatting and laughing in girlish fashion. There was a difference in their laughter, the result of the dissimilar lives they had led. One had ever been a happy, careless child, allowed to roam about in the castle or beyond it almost unattended, and had only to hold herself as became the position of a maiden of rank on special occasions, as when guests were staying in the castle; the other had been for years her father's assistant, engaged in work requiring shrewdness and quickness ...
— At Agincourt • G. A. Henty

... throughout to give plain facts, to substantiate with plain figures all I assert; and in no case have I allowed fancy to roam in idle speculations which cannot be demonstrated in practice. I do not pretend that my effort is "the most comprehensive and practical essay on the grape," as some of our friends call their productions, but I can claim for it strict adherence to ...
— The Cultivation of The Native Grape, and Manufacture of American Wines • George Husmann

... close to them his skin suddenly fell off, and a beautiful man stood beside them, all dressed in gold. "I am a king's son," he said, "and have been doomed by that unholy little dwarf, who had stolen my treasure, to roam about the woods as a wild bear till his death should set me free. Now he has ...
— The Blue Fairy Book • Various

... Which we have ta'en so many steps to gain. Think of the perils in our calling past, The chilling coldness of the midnight blast, The beating rain, the swiftly-driving snow, The various ills that we must undergo, Who roam, the glow-worms of the human race, The living Jack-a-Lanthorns of the place. 'Tis said by some, perchance to mock our toil, That we are prone to "waste the midnight oil!" And that a task thus idle to pursue Would be an idle waste of money, too! How hard that we the dark designs should rue ...
— A Righte Merrie Christmasse - The Story of Christ-Tide • John Ashton

... were there we'd snowball Death with skulls; Or ride away to hunt in Devil's Wood With ghosts of puppies that we walked of old. But you're alone; and solitude annuls Our earthly jokes; and strangely wise and good You roam forlorn along the streets ...
— Counter-Attack and Other Poems • Siegfried Sassoon

... the Birdofreedom was originally limited to about twelve degrees of latitude, but being like the Imperial Eagle of Italy (now extinct,) given to Roam, it has within the last fifty years greatly enlarged the area of its feeding grounds. It is now found as far North as the Border of the Arctic Sea, where it cultivates amicable relations with the hyperborean humming-bird, and Professor GRANT is ...
— Punchinello, Vol. 1, No. 14, July 2, 1870 • Various

... who claims the Thyads as her daughters; Fast by the fields with warriors dragon-sown, And where Ismenus rolls his rapid waters. It saw thee, the smoke, On the horned height—[358] It saw thee, and broke With a leap into light; Where roam Corycian nymphs the glorious mountain, And all melodious flows the old Castalian fountain Vocal with echoes wildly glad, The Nysian steeps with ivy clad, And shores with vineyards greenly blooming, Proclaiming, steep to shore, That Bacchus ...
— Athens: Its Rise and Fall, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... knit Hearts and hands together, Where our fireside comforts sit, In the wildest weather; O! they wander wide who roam For the joys of life from home! ...
— The American Union Speaker • John D. Philbrick

... western plains of the United States of America we are told: "At twelve or thirteen these yearnings can no longer be suppressed; and, banded together, the youths of from twelve to sixteen years roam over the country; and some of the most cold-blooded atrocities, daring attacks, and desperate combats have been made by these children in pursuit ...
— The Child and Childhood in Folk-Thought • Alexander F. Chamberlain

... spend one long day," she said, "all by ourselves; we will get up very early in the morning, and cook shall fill a basket with nice things to eat; then we will row down the river until we reach the wood, in which we will roam about all day, having our dinner under the boughs of some large tree, and be for all the world like gipsies; will that not be capital?" and Maud clapped her ...
— Leslie Ross: - or, Fond of a Lark • Charles Bruce

... than one storey, while in many cases their small doorway forms their only means of ventilation. Their roofs are covered with a pile of cotton-stalks and other litter, through which the pungent smoke of their dung fires slowly percolates, while fowls and goats, and the inevitable pariah dog roam about ...
— Peeps at Many Lands: Egypt • R. Talbot Kelly

... months of lessons for Umboo and the other wild elephants. They were not wild any longer, for the first thing they learned was that the tame elephants would help them, and next that the white and black men would be kind to them and feed them. So the jungle elephants, who used to roam about with Tusker for their leader, lost most of their wildness, quieted down, and were sent to different places in India to work in the lumber yards, or to carry Princes on ...
— Umboo, the Elephant • Howard R. Garis

... more near, forever dear! Where'er I rest or roam, Or in the city's crowded streets, Or by the blown sea foam, The thought of thee ...
— Outlines of English and American Literature • William J. Long

... Whose charming form and all-engaging air, At once his bosom fired with fond desire; And nearer still, her beauties to admire. He most gallantly saw her safely home; Attentions charm the sex where'er we roam. ...
— The Tales and Novels, Complete • Jean de La Fontaine

... first night he wandered into the boys' tent and brayed into Slim's ear, who gave such a startled jump that his bed went down over the side of the flooring, and Slim landed on the ground outside. After that Sandhelo was tied at night, but allowed to roam the ...
— The Campfire Girls on Ellen's Isle - The Trail of the Seven Cedars • Hildegard G. Frey

... to let any one know where she was, not liking to have even Lewis look on; she would elude Mrs. Bywank, and post Lewis in some good open spot where he could walk himself warm and be within hailing distance. Then she would wander off, her whistle at her belt, and roam about from tree to tree and rock to rock of her beloved woods, coming home so tired!Always in time for Rollo, if he was expected, never seeing any ...
— The Gold of Chickaree • Susan Warner

... say if I told your sovereign that the man he put at the head of the syndicate is only one of that crowd of unhanged thieves who roam about ...
— The Son of Monte-Cristo, Volume II (of 2) • Alexandre Dumas pere

... neighbourhood with their vague piping, as they sit perched on stiles, or loitering about the barn-doors in the evenings. Among the other exercises of the school, also, he has introduced the ancient art of archery, one of the squire's favourite themes, with such success, that the whipsters roam in truant bands about the neighbourhood, practising with their bows and arrows upon the birds of the air, and the beasts of the field; and not unfrequently making a foray into the squire's domains, to the ...
— Bracebridge Hall • Washington Irving

... was a Yankee skipper who round about did roam; His name was Stephen Folger,—Nantucket was his home: And having sailed to Vera Cruz, he had been skinned full sore By the Senor Don ...
— Famous Privateersmen and Adventurers of the Sea • Charles H. L. Johnston

... at least, have stilled an unquiet impulse in me. Then, moreover, as regarded his unceremonious ejectment, the late Surveyor was not altogether ill-pleased to be recognised by the Whigs as an enemy; since his inactivity in political affairs—his tendency to roam, at will, in that broad and quiet field where all mankind may meet, rather than confine himself to those narrow paths where brethren of the same household must diverge from one another—had sometimes made it questionable with his brother Democrats whether he was a friend. Now, after he had won ...
— The Scarlet Letter • Nathaniel Hawthorne

... were compelled to remain, as there was no other creek in sight for some miles, and the horses, although shod, could only travel slowly over the terribly rough ground. When we turned them out, they preferred to stand still, rather than roam about among the rocks and boulders for food. The day was cool; the southern horizon, the only one we could see, was bounded entirely by red sandhills and casuarina timber. The horses ate nothing all night, and stood almost ...
— Australia Twice Traversed, The Romance of Exploration • Ernest Giles

... of these streets might disgust the unseasoned stranger for ever with Southern life; but to roam through them in the early twilight is the way to find the spirit of the past without searching. Effort spoils the spell. Strange indeed must have been the procession of races, parties and factions that passed along here between these very houses, or ...
— Wanderings by southern waters, eastern Aquitaine • Edward Harrison Barker

... ye little folk! sheltered at home From the blasts that over the white world roam; You are merry and gay 'mid your plentiful stores, Oh, think of us ready to die out ...
— Little Folks (December 1884) - A Magazine for the Young • Various

... have, and close akin are they. For both are free And wild and proud, full of the ecstasy Of life untrammeled; living, day by day, A law unto themselves; yet breaking none Of Nature's perfect code. And far afield, remote from man's abode, They roam the ...
— Alaska Days with John Muir • Samual Hall Young

... extracted the white pith from certain rushes of the region, which made very good lamp-wicks for the kind of lamps then in use in Scotland. These wicks of pith he sold about the town in small penny bundles. In order to get his supply of rushes he was obliged to roam the country far and wide, and along the banks of streams. When he had gathered as many as he could carry he would bring them home to be stripped. To the end of his days, when he knew familiarly every plant that grew in his native land, he had a particular fondness for all ...
— Captains of Industry - or, Men of Business Who Did Something Besides Making Money • James Parton

... thy task and high In radiant warmth to roam the sky, To keep from ill that kindly ground, Its meads and farms, where mead is found, A land whose commons live content, Where each man's lot is excellent, Where hosts to hail thee shall upstand, Where lads are bold and lasses bland, A land I oft from hill that's ...
— Wild Wales - Its People, Language and Scenery • George Borrow

... what unpromised joy Expands my heart to meet thee in Savoy! Doom'd o'er the world through devious paths to roam, Each clime my country, and each house my home, My soul is sooth'd, my cares have found an end: I ...
— Satanstoe • James Fenimore Cooper

... solar road Where shaggy forms o'er ice-built mountains roam, The Muse has broke the twilight gloom To cheer the shivering native's dull abode. And oft, beneath the odorous shade Of Chili's boundless forests laid, She deigns to hear the savage youth repeat In loose numbers wildly sweet Their feather-cinctured chiefs, and dusky loves. Her track, where'er ...
— The Golden Treasury - Of the Best Songs and Lyrical Poems in the English Language • Various

... we perform'd the last office for the dead, and tho' his enemies, honour'd him with a funeral pile; but while Eumolpus was making an epitaph, his eyes roam'd here and there, to find an image that might raise ...
— The Satyricon • Petronius Arbiter

... this section their winter home either at the Tanner or the Hance Trail, but there was no sign of recent visitors at either place, unless it was the numerous burro tracks in the sand. These tracks were doubtless made by some of the many wild burros that roam all the lower plateaus in the upper end ...
— Through the Grand Canyon from Wyoming to Mexico • E. L. Kolb

... thought, for very life; but, as a matter of fact—and you shall see—it was to very death. The blower of whistles was stationed there to drive back into the covert any pheasants who were so misguided as to wish to roam thence into ...
— The Way of the Wild • F. St. Mars

... the breezes that blow Through the gardens and walks of thy home, To murmur my love as I go And play with thy locks as I roam! For changeful the breezes and bleak— Now balmy, now chilly they blow— Yet they, love, are kissing thy cheek, O heart of my heart, not changeful my love towards thee— ...
— Welsh Lyrics of the Nineteenth Century • Edmund O. Jones

... opportunity of observing this bird speaks in terms of admiration of its vast powers of flight; it is not surprising, therefore, that an individual should now and then wing its way across the Channel to the British Islands, and roam over our meads and fields until it is shot." (G.) It is, I believe, the swallow of the Bible,—abundant, though only a summer migrant, in the Holy Land. I have never seen it, that I know of, nor thought of it in the lecture on the Swallow; but give ...
— Love's Meinie - Three Lectures on Greek and English Birds • John Ruskin

... wider the fields which open to our view, and there is interest for us in all of them. We roam at our pleasure over vast fields of literature, digressing here and there just as our fancy takes us. There is no danger, moreover, in being side-tracked, for such divagations in the realms of bibliography ...
— The Book-Hunter at Home • P. B. M. Allan

... which were best, to roam or rest? The land's lap or the water's breast? 80 To sleep on yellow millet-sheaves, Or swim in lucid shallows just Eluding water-lily leaves, An inch from Death's black fingers, thrust To lock you, whom release he must; Which life ...
— Dramatic Romances • Robert Browning

... not only apportions natures, but corresponding bodies, so that we can easily see how the golden age is to return again, when peradventure deceits shall be impossible, and all the virtues thrive by mere necessity under the reign of this perfected Science of the Soul. Yet, roam where she would, there were always two mysteries that allured her back again, as Thone's curt sentence told,—"Tonkunst und Arzenei"; and to these might be added Race, in defiance of Mr. Buckle. Assuredly the Hebrew owes acknowledgment to her, and not George Borrow, with all his weird ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 9, No. 56, June, 1862 • Various

... of Castle-Lyons, near Fermoy, in the County Cork, were true children of Erin, and they taught their son to love, even as they did themselves, that green isle far away, from which a hard fate had compelled them to roam. Patriotism, indeed, was hereditary in the family. The great-grandfather of our hero suffered death for his fidelity to the cause of Ireland in the memorable year 1798; and a still-more remarkable fact is that ...
— Speeches from the Dock, Part I • Various

... no further I'll roam; But follow my shadow that points the way home; Your gay southern Shores shall not tempt me to stay; For my Maggy's at Home, and my Children at play! Tis this makes my Bonnet set light on my brow, Gives my sinews their strength ...
— Rural Tales, Ballads, and Songs • Robert Bloomfield

... lifted her face to the sparkling skies; and then, while the tears gathered in her own eyes and her sweet voice trembled a little, she sang that song dear to the hearts of all wanderers no matter where they roam, "Home, ...
— The Cave of Gold - A Tale of California in '49 • Everett McNeil

... of wo Like the caravan we go, Leaving all our groves and streams For the far-off land of dreams. There are prairies waving high, Boundless as the sheeted sky, Where our fathers' spirits roam, And the red-man ...
— Poems • George P. Morris

... the peach and cherry may have their place, And the pear is fine in its stately grace; The plum belongs to a puckery race And maketh awry the mouth and face; But I long to roam in the orchard free, The dear old orchard that used to be, And gather the beauties that dropped for me From the bending boughs ...
— Poems - Vol. IV • Hattie Howard

... not as well off as I was at their age. They are restless and won't work unless they gets big pay and they spends the money too easy. The colored people are too idle and orderless. They fight and hate one another and roam around in ...
— Slave Narratives: A Folk History of Slavery in the United States - Volume II. Arkansas Narratives. Part I • Work Projects Administration

... I had frequent interviews with Jasper, sometimes in his tent, sometimes on the heath, about which we would roam for hours, discoursing on various matters. Sometimes, mounted on one of his horses, of which he had several, I would accompany him to various fairs and markets in the neighbourhood, to which he went on his own affairs, or those ...
— Lavengro - The Scholar, The Gypsy, The Priest • George Borrow

... the centre sit, Yet when my other far does roam, Thine leans and hearkens after it, And rows erect ...
— Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam • Omar Khayyam

... grow in the mountains. A variable, but generally mild climate, brings to maturity the products of extreme latitudes. Half the country is favourable to the palm and the orange. Numerous and thriving flocks roam across the plains in winter, and ascend to the mountains in summer. Horses, cows, and sheep live and multiply in the open air, without need of shelter. Indian buffaloes swarm in the marshes. Every species of produce requisite ...
— The Roman Question • Edmond About

... and kindness of the animal friends. He was the young chief and the hero of No Man's Trail! The bears and wolves were his warriors; the buffalo and elk the hostile tribes upon whom he went to war. Small as he was, he soon preferred to roam alone in the woods. His parents were often anxious, but, on the other hand, they entertained the hope that he would some day be "wakan," a mysterious or supernatural man, for he was getting power from his wild companions and from the silent forces ...
— Old Indian Days • [AKA Ohiyesa], Charles A. Eastman

... soon after. When the evening meal was finished our young rookies found that they had the evening to themselves. They could stay in squad room, or could go out into the open, if they preferred, though, as rookies, they could not roam as they pleased over ...
— Uncle Sam's Boys in the Ranks - or, Two Recruits in the United States Army • H. Irving Hancock

... all went on as before, but then Lysander ordered his watching galley to hoist a shield as a signal as soon as the Athenians had all gone off to roam the country in search of food, and then he spread out his fleet to its utmost width, and came rowing out with his 180 ships to fall upon the deserted Athenians. Not one general was at his post, except Konon, and he, with the eight galleys he could man in haste, sailed out in all haste—not to ...
— Aunt Charlotte's Stories of Greek History • Charlotte M. Yonge

... I often roam I can behold my cot, my humble home; There I was born, and when this life is o'er I hope to sleep upon the river's shore. There is the orchard which I helped to rear, It well repays my labor year by year: One apple tree towers high above the rest Where every spring a blackbird has its nest. ...
— Canadian Wild Flowers • Helen M. Johnson

... heroes in so alluring a form, that her sons and daughters are assured of a welcome in any part of the world, and start with the great asset of being always expected to "make good" in every land of their adoption. Wherever they may roam, we find them occupying positions of influence, and still cherishing and promulgating the traditions and customs of the Land of the Heather, which impel to high thinking, resolute doing, and the upholding of old standards, such ...
— Defenders of Democracy • Militia of Mercy

... sundering oar, Darkness; and noises of night; Clashing of streams in the sea, Wave against wave as a sword, Clamour of currents, and foam, Rains making ruin on earth, Winds that wax ravenous and roam As wolves in a wolfish horde; Fruits growing faint in the tree, And blind things dead in their birth Famine, and blighting of corn, When thy time was come ...
— Atalanta in Calydon • Algernon Charles Swinburne

... stood in the Haymarket. All the dealers had closed their establishments or cleared away their goods and gone home. About this place, with its tattered population, its dirty and nauseous courtyards and numerous alleys, Raskolnikoff dearly loved to roam in his aimless wanderings. He attracted no notice there. At the corner of K—— Lane were a dealer and his wife, who were engaged in packing up their wares, consisting of tapes, handkerchiefs, cotton, &c., preparatory to going home. They ...
— The Continental Classics, Volume XVIII., Mystery Tales • Various

... Papa's at sea, The big billows rock him as Mama rocks thee. He hastes to his dear ones o'er breakers of foam. Then hush little darling till Papa comes home. Sleep little baby, hush little baby, Papa is coming, no longer to roam. ...
— Yesterdays • Ella Wheeler Wilcox

... thought, the desert glade Measuring I roam with ling'ring steps and slow; And still a watchful glance around me throw, Anxious to shun the print of human tread: No other means I find, no surer aid From the world's prying eye to hide my woe: So well my wild disorder'd ...
— The Sonnets, Triumphs, and Other Poems of Petrarch • Petrarch

... the political accordion, by writing controversial electioneering letters. Besides the principal leaders of the parties, numerous subaltern officers of the administration are summoned to the same service, and, instead of attending to the duties of their offices, roam, recite, ...
— Memoir of the Life of John Quincy Adams. • Josiah Quincy

... glow showed the forms of sleeping men. Nothing was moving save the goats, which are always brought into the special house for them in the middle of the town, to keep them from the leopards, which roam from dusk to dawn. ...
— Travels in West Africa • Mary H. Kingsley

... railways connecting them. Now there lived in the town marked A a man who was born there, and during the whole of his life had never once left his native place. From his youth upwards he had been very industrious, sticking incessantly to his trade, and had no desire whatever to roam abroad. However, on attaining his fiftieth birthday he decided to see something of his country, and especially to pay a visit to a very old friend living at the town marked Z. What he proposed was this: that he would start from his home, enter every ...
— Amusements in Mathematics • Henry Ernest Dudeney

... actor, Michael Wiehe, caused me the third thrilling moment. Listening to the words of the poet from a bad place in the gallery, I was hardly the only one who felt strangely stirred, as Wiehe, letting his eyes roam round ...
— Recollections Of My Childhood And Youth • George Brandes

... daily care of a sort supplied by the janitor if desired, a kitchenette where eggs and coffee for breakfast and dishes for invalids may be prepared, and restaurants galore for other meals. Thus the women of the family are set free to roam the streets in search of bargains and to join others like unto themselves for matinees ...
— The Cost of Shelter • Ellen H. Richards

... tortoise, anciently, Tired of her hole, the world would see. Prone are all such, self-banish'd, to roam— Prone are all cripples to abhor their home. Two ducks, to whom the gossip told The secret of her purpose bold, Profess'd to have the means whereby They could her wishes gratify. "Our boundless road," said they, "behold! It is the open air; And through ...
— A Hundred Fables of La Fontaine • Jean de La Fontaine

... of actions against unorganized or partially organized forces, acting in independent or semi-independent bodies. Such bodies have little or only crude training and are under nominal and loose leadership and control. They assemble, roam about, and disperse at will. They endeavor to win by stealth or by force of superior numbers, employing ambuscades, sudden dashes or rushes, ...
— Infantry Drill Regulations, United States Army, 1911 - Corrected to April 15, 1917 (Changes Nos. 1 to 19) • United States War Department

... They disclose picturesque scenery, and the railways from London wind through their valleys and dart into the tunnels under their hills, whose tops disclose the gyrating sails of an army of windmills, while over their slopes roam the flocks of well-tended sheep that ultimately become the the much-prized South Down mutton. The chalk-cliffs bordering the Downs slope to the sea, and in front are numerous little towns, for the whole coast is dotted with watering-places. A few miles east of Brighton is the port of ...
— England, Picturesque and Descriptive - A Reminiscence of Foreign Travel • Joel Cook

... exists, it is the curse of Hecate. The priestess had never the power to conceive it, neither the strength to kill it; but hear me further. I do not believe thou art cursed. My view of a presiding demon or divinity runs not in such direction. Gods and goddesses roam not to and fro blasting spirits of mortals in such manner. It is an idea born of older times, and doubtless will survive down the ages until men grow wiser; then such nonsense will be looked upon with ridicule, and become a ...
— Saronia - A Romance of Ancient Ephesus • Richard Short

... quite so pleasant being in a place as he had anticipated. He had been accustomed to roam about the streets subject only to his own control. Now he was no longer his own master. He must go and come at the will of his employer. To be sure, his earnings were greater than in his street life, and he had a regular home. He knew beforehand where he was going to sleep, and ...
— Sam's Chance - And How He Improved It • Horatio Alger

... her knees domestic duties meet, And fireside pleasures gambol at her feet. Where shall that land, that spot of earth be found? Art thou a man?—a patriot?—look around! Oh! thou shalt find, howe'er thy footsteps roam, That land thy COUNTRY, ...
— The Canadian Elocutionist • Anna Kelsey Howard

... wanderers I meet, As from their night-sports they trudge home, With counterfeiting voice I greet, And call them on with me to roam: Through woods, through lakes; Through bogs, through brakes; Or else, unseen, with them I go, All in the nick, To play some trick, And frolic ...
— English Songs and Ballads • Various

... lying in the middle of the sea, which each of the rovers, bringing his ships up on either side, was holding. The captains were tempted by the pleasant look of the beach, and the comeliness of the shores led them to look through the interior of the springtide woods, to go through the glades, and roam over the sequestered forests. It was here that the advance of Koller and Horwendil brought them face to face without any witness. Then Horwendil endeavoured to address the king first, asking him in what way it was his pleasure to ...
— The Danish History, Books I-IX • Saxo Grammaticus ("Saxo the Learned")

... since you came home? I promised your father on his death-bed that I would look after you, and I have tried to do so in every possible way. I sincerely hoped that your present work would suit you better than in an office. You are free to roam where you will, and whatever adventure has taken place in this city during the past six months you were in the midst of it, ...
— Glen of the High North • H. A. Cody

... inch-deep in watery slush occasioned by the warmth of the fire. At Siss the weather cleared, and we set out next day with renewed spirits, which the deer seemed to share, for they, too, had revelled in moss, which was plentiful around the povarnia, while, as a rule, they had to roam for several miles in search of it. Siberian reindeer seem to have an insatiable appetite; whenever we halted on the road (often several times within the hour) every team would set to work pawing up the snow in search of food, with such engrossed ...
— From Paris to New York by Land • Harry de Windt

... of quiet is also a protection against tiresome, talkative, people. It enables one to preserve an air of kindly attention, while one's thoughts, free and untrammeled, roam at their own sweet will, drifting back just in time to utter an ...
— Social Life - or, The Manners and Customs of Polite Society • Maud C. Cooke

... first-rate chaps that it looked as if we ought to get off flying. He blew up the squatters in a general way for taking all the country, and not giving the poor man a chance—for neglecting their immense herds of cattle and suffering them to roam all over the country, putting temptation in the way of poor people, and causing confusion and recklessness of all kinds. Some of these cattle are never seen from the time they are branded till they ...
— Robbery Under Arms • Thomas Alexander Browne, AKA Rolf Boldrewood

... calm fjord where you might drift blissfully along, as it were, suspended in the midst of the vast, blue, ethereal space. And when the summer vacation came, with its glorious freedom and irresponsibility, he would roam at his own sweet will through forest and field, until hunger and fatigue forced him to return ...
— Essays on Scandinavian Literature • Hjalmar Hjorth Boyesen

... fairies dance on t' top o' t' flaars An' roam through t' pleasant dells, Like monarchs i' their marble halls, I' t' ...
— Yorkshire Dialect Poems • F.W. Moorman

... Indianner, it was his native home, And at the age of seventeen young Sam began to roam; And first he went to Texas, a cowboy for to be— He robs the ...
— Desert Conquest - or, Precious Waters • A. M. Chisholm

... her plenteous reeking store, And bears a brimmer to the dairy door; Her cows dismiss'd, the luscious mead to roam, Till ere again recall them loaded home. And now the DAIRY claims her choicest care, And half her household find employment there: Slow rolls the churn, its load of clogging cream At once foregoes ...
— The Farmer's Boy - A Rural Poem • Robert Bloomfield

... 'That everlasting storm which no one guides' tells me in thunder tones that there is a home of rest in the presence of the infinite Father! Oh, chance does not roam, like a destroying angel, through that 'snow-powder of stars!' The love of our God is over all his works as a mantle! Though you should 'take the wings of the morning and dwell in the uttermost parts of the sea,' lo! he is there! The sorrowing children of the universe are not orphans! Neither did ...
— Beulah • Augusta J. Evans

... sacred buckler on the left upbore. Him Circe, his enamoured bride, of yore, Wild with desire, so ancient legends say, Smote with her golden rod, and sprinkling o'er His limbs her magic poisons, made a jay, And sent to roam the air, ...
— The Aeneid of Virgil - Translated into English Verse by E. Fairfax Taylor • Virgil

... men been residing in Egypt or the Soudan they would have been condemned to penal servitude for a term of years. It is more satisfactory to learn, on the authority of Colonel Freire d'Andrade, that the convicts to whom allusion has already been made are "no longer permitted to roam at large about the colony, but are, save a very few who are allowed to live outside on giving a security, kept in the forts ...
— Political and Literary essays, 1908-1913 • Evelyn Baring

... to one thing. If a fellow is crazy about butterflies, he may as well roam in Africa as a lunatic with a net as anywhere else; but the curious part of the matter is, that my study of Arabic is intended to prepare me for a trip to the very ...
— In Search of the Okapi - A Story of Adventure in Central Africa • Ernest Glanville

... "Wheresoe'er thou may'st roam, Wheresoe'er thou mak'st thy home, May God thy footsteps guide, Watch o'er thee and provide. This is my earnest prayer for thee, Welcome, stranger, from over ...
— The Hawaiian Archipelago • Isabella L. Bird

... in a lively trip when sailing through the air, The word is given, 'Let her go!' To land I know not where. The view is grand, 'tis like a dream, when many miles from home. My castle in the air, I love above the clouds to roam." ...
— The Red-Blooded Heroes of the Frontier • Edgar Beecher Bronson

... containing an even more miscellaneous collection of food. A half-consumed ham, with more than a mere suspicion of dirt on its yellowish-white fat; some concoction in a bowl that might have been brawn made from some peculiarly liverish pig, or—from one of the many homeless mongrels that roam the streets at night; a pile of noxious-looking mussels, side by side with a glistening mass of particularly yellow whelks; a round of what purported to be beef—very fat and very underdone; some black shiny ...
— The Sorcery Club • Elliott O'Donnell

... said, To places where that timid maid (Save by Colonial Bishops' aid) Could never hope to roam. The Payne-cum-Lauri feat he taught As he had learnt it; for he thought The choicest fruits of Progress ought To bless the ...
— Fifty Bab Ballads • William S. Gilbert

... is prodigious, and whose name is Legion, and who populate the coach- house to that extent that I daily expect to see the carriage going off bodily, drawn by myriads of industrious fleas in harness. The rats are kept away, quite comfortably, by scores of lean cats, who roam about the garden for that purpose. The lizards, of course, nobody cares for; they play in the sun, and don't bite. The little scorpions are merely curious. The beetles are rather late, and have not appeared yet. The frogs are ...
— Pictures from Italy • Charles Dickens

... and strode haughtily out of the office; setting at defiance, in his indignation, those ancient laws of chivalry, which not only made it proper and lawful for all good knights to hear the praise of the ladies to whom they were devoted, but rendered it incumbent upon them to roam about the world, and knock at head all such matter-of-fact and un-poetical characters, as declined to exalt, above all the earth, damsels whom they had never chanced to look upon or hear of—as if that ...
— The Life And Adventures Of Nicholas Nickleby • Charles Dickens

... revisit my kindred and my native country; but in Naples, alas! I could no longer find you, and could only hear vague reports concerning you; so that having in vain tried to meet with you, I ceased to roam about idly, and stopped for a while in Venice. From that time to this I have lived without receiving any other information about my family, except knowing its name." You may judge whether Trufaldin was not more than ordinarily moved all this while; in one word (to tell you shortly that ...
— The Blunderer • Moliere

... probity, who was fond of deciding lawsuits equitably, out of a fear lest, as in the times of Julian, when Innocence was allowed a fair opportunity of defending itself, the pride of the powerful nobles, which was accustomed to roam at large with unrestrained licence, ...
— The Roman History of Ammianus Marcellinus • Ammianus Marcellinus

... Smiling at my master's gates, Freedom my return awaits. But the liberal grant in vain Tempts me to be wild again. Can a prudent Dove decline Blissful bondage such as mine? Over hills and fields to roam, Fortune's guest without a home; Under leaves to hide one's head, Slightly sheltered, coarsely fed; Now my better lot bestows Sweet repast, and soft repose; Now the generous bowl I sip As it leaves Anacreon's lip; Void of care, and free from dread, From his fingers snatch his bread, ...
— Anecdotes of the late Samuel Johnson, LL.D. - during the last twenty years of his life • Hester Lynch Piozzi

... strange contrast to the dark skin. His garments were sadly torn, and he had patched them in many places with buckskin. Such men still come and go in the remote places among the mountain ranges and deserts of the West. They were almost the first to penetrate the wilderness and they will roam over it so long as any patch of it ...
— When the West Was Young • Frederick R. Bechdolt

... and nine days. Since then, whether I am, or am not, I cannot tell. Never question the dead, stranger, for they see naught, and a thick night environs them. 'Tis said that such as in life knew the cruel joys of Venus roam the glades of a dense forest of myrtles. For me who died a virgin, I sleep a dreamless sleep. They have graven two Loves on the stone of my sepulchre. One gives mortals the light of day; the other quenches it in their tender eyes for ever. The countenance of both is the same, ...
— The Well of Saint Clare • Anatole France

... joy, in boundless measure, Stor'd, Lord Jesus, are in Thee, Pastures of unfading pleasure, Where we roam and feast so free. Light of joy! illumine me Ere my heart quite broken be! Jesus, let mine eyes behold Thee; Lord, refresh me ...
— Paul Gerhardt's Spiritual Songs - Translated by John Kelly • Paul Gerhardt

... at feeling himself free to roam through the world once more, Fortunatus set out on his journey without losing a day. From court to court he went, astonishing everyone by the magnificence of his dress and the splendour of his presents. At length he grew as tired ...
— The Grey Fairy Book • Various

... he-goat that is offered as a sacrifice on such an occasion is not actually slain, but being besmeared with "Sindur" (red oxide of mercury) and generally having one of the ears cropped or bored is let loose, i.e. allowed to roam about until clandestinely passed on to some neighbouring village to which, the goat is credited with the virtue of transferring the epidemic from the village originally infected. The goats thus marked are not looked upon with particular ...
— Indian Ghost Stories - Second Edition • S. Mukerji

... temperament than the land of his birth. In South Africa he felt he could find more satisfaction and more enjoyment than in England, whose conventionalities did not appeal to his rebellious, unsophisticated heart. He liked to roam about in an old coat and wideawake hat; to forget that civilisation existed; to banish from his mind all memory of cities where man must bow down to Mrs. Grundy and may not defy, unscathed, ...
— Cecil Rhodes - Man and Empire-Maker • Princess Catherine Radziwill

... the one evil of our country," answered the invisible man. "Many large and fierce bears roam in the Valley of Voe, and when they can catch any of us they eat us up; but as they cannot see us, we seldom ...
— Dorothy and the Wizard in Oz • L. Frank Baum.

... Freya next came nigh, with golden tears; The loveliest Goddess she in Heaven, by all Most honour'd after Frea, Odin's wife. Her long ago the wandering Oder took To mate, but left her to roam distant lands; Since then she seeks him, and weeps tears of gold. Names hath she many; Vanadis on earth They call her, Freya is her name ...
— Myths of the Norsemen - From the Eddas and Sagas • H. A. Guerber

... seas divide us; but I claim No tears, but tenderness to answer mine. Go where I will, to me thou art the same, A loved regret which I would not resign. There yet are two things in my destiny, A world to roam through, and ...
— The Friendships of Women • William Rounseville Alger

... according to the Dyaks, rove about the jungle and hunt for wild beasts, as the Dyaks do themselves. Girgasi, already mentioned, is specially addicted to the chase, and the Dyaks say he is often to be met hunting in the forest. There are certain animals who roam about in packs in the jungle. These are supposed to be the dogs which accompany the spirits when they are out hunting, and they attack those whom the spirits wish to kill. I have never seen one of ...
— Children of Borneo • Edwin Herbert Gomes

... lark's low-built nest, To tear the soft young from the mother's warm breast. The sheep and the cow, in apparent dejection, Were quietly chewing the cud of reflection. The cavies and ermines were running a race, Armadillo was off to a grasshopper chace. The cat was surprised to see animals roam, And she purr'd when she thought of her ...
— The Quadrupeds' Pic-Nic • F. B. C.

... after the panic is over they will support you again," and that was a correct proposition. He saved my copyrights, and saved me from financial ruin. He it was who arranged with my creditors to allow me to roam the face of the earth and persecute the nations thereof with lectures, promising at the end of four years I would pay dollar for dollar. That arrangement was made, otherwise I would now be living out-of-doors under an umbrella, and a borrowed one ...
— Mark Twain, A Biography, 1835-1910, Complete - The Personal And Literary Life Of Samuel Langhorne Clemens • Albert Bigelow Paine

... not money enough in Maricopa County to pay him to go there again, while the other had never stopped running—at least, he had not returned to his usual haunts since "the thing" looked at him. Still, it is haunted country all about here. The souls of the Mojaves roam upon Ghost Mountain, and the "bad men's hunting-grounds" of the Yumas and Navajos are over in the volcanic country of Sonora. It is, therefore, no unusual thing to find signs and wonders ...
— Myths And Legends Of Our Own Land, Complete • Charles M. Skinner

... followed with a spirited twang of "Dear heart" on the violin, accompanying it with the words. Again a noise was heard. "What can it be?" said one. "What can it be?" said another. There was a push at the door. "Oh!" cried Hodgkinson, "it's only one of the hogs that roam about the alley, who, having more taste than the old ones, is come to hear our mirth and music." At this moment the door was burst open, and John's master entered. Before the latter had time to speak, or John to reflect, the boy's wit got the better ...
— The Mirror of Taste, and Dramatic Censor - Vol. I. No. 3. March 1810 • Various

... wells and spooky attics, to say nothing of barnyard 'sperits' that roam about to scare the cows into giving buttermilk and cream cheese," replied Jane. "It might just be—" she hesitated, then jumped to her feet with a little gleeful bounce—"it might be a ghost from Shirley's own home town. Strange we never had one ...
— Jane Allen: Junior • Edith Bancroft

... poet will not roam; Remaining on his native heath, he Will seek an anodyne at home, Nor look beyond the Thames for Lethe; And if he fades away, denied The usual balm in cardiac crises, Say only this of him, "He died ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Volume 158, February 11, 1920 • Various

... not much doing on the farm, he would sometimes be out all night with his gun, it is true, but he would seldom fire it, and then only at some beast of prey; on the hill-side or in the valley he would lie watching the ways and doings of the many creatures that roam the night—each with its object, each with its reasons, each with its fitting of means to ends. One of the grounds of his dislike to the new possessors of the old land was the raid he feared upon ...
— What's Mine's Mine • George MacDonald

... behind the tamarisks—the parrots fly together— As the sun is sinking slowly over home; And his last ray seems to mock us, shackled in a lifelong tether That drags us back, howe'er so far we roam. Hard her service, poor her payment—she in ancient, tattered raiment— India, she the grim stepmother of our kind. If a year of life be lent her, if her temple's shrine we enter, The door is ...
— In The Yule-Log Glow, Vol. IV (of IV) • Harrison S. Morris

... him corona militiae as did King Edward III of England. John was what may be called the "soul of chivalry," in his opinion Paris was the most chivalrous city in the world, and that is probably why he felt called upon to roam Europe as a knight-errant instead of looking after his wife and her relatives, and incidentally his Kingdom of Bohemia. According to Count Luetzow, John intended to re-establish the Round Table of King Arthur, and to this end he invited all the most celebrated knights of Europe to a tournament ...
— From a Terrace in Prague • Lieut.-Col. B. Granville Baker

... all again. It was aggravated by awe—an awe to which I was determined not to succumb, notwithstanding the secret uneasiness under which I was laboring. So I let my eyes continue to roam, till they fell upon the one thing moving in the room. This was a man's foot, which I now saw projecting from behind the drapery through which I had seen the white hand glide. It was swinging up and down in an impatient way, so out of keeping with ...
— The Bronze Hand - 1897 • Anna Katharine Green (Mrs. Charles Rohlfs)

... of home Drag at my heart to-day? Why should I longer roam? Why should I not go home? Five years of toilsome wanderings May claim ...
— Bees in Amber - A Little Book Of Thoughtful Verse • John Oxenham

... service to the test. For I love such archers as you have shown yourselves to be, and it were a sad pity to decree such men to death. England could not produce the like again, for many a day. But, in sooth, I cannot allow you to roam in the forest and shoot my deer; nor to take the law of the land into your own hands. Therefore, I now appoint you to be Royal Archers and mine own especial body-guard. There be one or two civil matters ...
— Robin Hood • J. Walker McSpadden

... Bereford. She found a strange relief when sitting by his side listening to the stories which brought before her vivid conceptions of her childhood and its happy past never to return—the days when her heart was free to roam in its wayward and fanciful nights full of ardour and the bouyant aspirations ...
— Lady Rosamond's Secret - A Romance of Fredericton • Rebecca Agatha Armour

... love; on board you must be getting; But while upon the sea you gaily roam, Remember that a heart for thee is fretting— The tender little ...
— The Complete Plays of Gilbert and Sullivan - The 14 Gilbert And Sullivan Plays • William Schwenk Gilbert and Arthur Sullivan

... hidden in the grass. There was no doubt whatever who were the thieves. Convicts are employed to guard the Government stores when the boat arrives from Ternate. Two of them watch all night, and often take the opportunity to roam about ...
— The Malay Archipelago - Volume II. (of II.) • Alfred Russel Wallace

... treachery, cannot be expected to hold any ultra-humanitarian views upon the subject. He has not been brought in contact with the several partially-civilized tribes, in whose advancement many see possibilities for the whole race. He cannot understand why the government allows the Indians to roam over enormous tracts of land, rich in minerals they will never extract and containing agricultural possibilities they will never seek to realize. His plan would be to have only the same governmental care exercised ...
— Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science, Vol. XXVI., December, 1880. • Various

... and Eliot and Mom Beck went from one darkened room to another with hot lemonade, and Betty was left to roam about the place by herself. Once she slipped into the sewing-room where the tissue-paper costumes were laid out in readiness beside the dainty little flower-shaped hats. Joyce's was patterned after a pale blue morning-glory, ...
— The Little Colonel's House Party • Annie Fellows Johnston

... I am grown to be a man I'll be a sailor if I can; For sailors, everywhere they roam Are sure ...
— Kernel Cob And Little Miss Sweetclover • George Mitchel

... toward tea-time, after another fascinating roam about the town,—into its back-yards and blind alleys, and along its pebbly beach,—as well as numerous exciting rides on the backs of the mules, the party gathered on the tiny veranda of the New Inn, crowding it to its utmost capacity. The purpose of this formal meeting was to decide ...
— John and Betty's History Visit • Margaret Williamson

... surveyed with approbation Stephen's full, handsome presence. Jannan was a successful, a big, man. Well, so was he too. But he thought with keen longing of the time when he was twenty-one, and free, free to roam self-sufficient. He thought of that Howat Penny of which they had spoken, black as he was black in the family tradition; he had seen Hesselius's portrait of the other; and, but for the tied hair and continental buff, it might have been a replica ...
— The Three Black Pennys - A Novel • Joseph Hergesheimer

... has never been broken by the plough, that it is difficult and hazardous to form a decided opinion on the latter. If you ask a stockman what kind of a country lies, either to his right, or to his left, he is sure to condemn it, unless it will afford the most abundant pasture. Accustomed to roam about from one place to another, these men despise any but the richest tracts, and include the rest of the neighbourhood in one sweeping clause of condemnation. Thus I was led to expect, that we should pass over a country of the very worst description, between Underaliga and the Morumbidgee. ...
— Two Expeditions into the Interior of Southern Australia, Complete • Charles Sturt

... winds mutter, howl, and moan, To scare my woodland walk, And frightened fancy flees, to roam Where ghosts and ...
— Poems • Mary Baker Eddy

... leads us; Round the land in jollity; Rag-dealing, nag-stealing, Everywhere we roam; Brass mending, ass vending, Happier than the quality; Swipes soaking, pipes smoking, Ev'ry barn a home; Tink, tink, a tink a tink, Our life is full of fun, boys; Clink tink, a tink a tink, Our busy hammers ring; Clink, tink, a tink a tink, Our job will soon be done boys; Then tune we merrily The ...
— Tom Brown at Oxford • Thomas Hughes

... their beds doomed to lie and roam as the solitaries of a sleepless night. They met next day like a couple emerging from sirocco deserts, indisposed for conversation or even short companionship, much of the night's dry turmoil in their heads. ...
— The Shaving of Shagpat • George Meredith

... one I meet; Shoeless I wander about through the day, Wearing my young life in sorrow away. No one to help me, no one to love, No one to pity me, none to caress, Fatherless, motherless, sadly I roam; A child of misfortune, ...
— Watch Yourself Go By • Al. G. Field

... leave the rude fort they had builded? Why did they seek far away a new home? O innocent babe! Roanoak's lost nestling! How shall we learn where thy footsteps did roam? 'Mid the rude tribes of the primeval forest, Bearing the signet of Christ on thy brow, Wert thou the teacher and guide of the savage? Who, of thy mission, can aught tell us now? Through the dim ages comes only the perfume, Left where ...
— The White Doe - The Fate of Virginia Dare • Sallie Southall Cotten

... were out of the house, Malcolm assured Duncan, to the old man's great satisfaction, that, had he not found him there, he would, within another month, have set out to roam Scotland in ...
— The Marquis of Lossie • George MacDonald

... for what I'm about to say, Miss Sparrow,' he began, pacing the roam, and probably hurling the words at her like pebbles from a sling. 'I'm aware it isn't customary for a man to declare himself on so short an acquaintance, but I'm a plain, straightforward ...
— Lippincott's Magazine, Vol. 20, August 1877 • Various

... flashes scorn from all her comely features, To be compared by any man with such "disgusting creatures." And all the fair Americans, who roam the wide world over, Will trample down this windy chaff and Japaneesy clover. 'Tis not thy fault, O SINO SAN—we find the truth and strike it, Farewell, thou AUDREY of the East—grin on then "As you Like It!" But never more by writer bold be canonised or sainted, Deluded ...
— Punch or the London Charivari, Vol. 104, May 27, 1893 • Various

... shoulders threw himself into a wicker-work easy-chair, and let his eyes—which were much keener than was properly compatible with the half-affected expression of indolence that had become habitual to him—roam over the heterogeneous collection of articles around. These were abundantly familiar to him—the long dressing-table, with all its appliances for making-up, the mirrors, the wigs on blocks, the gay-colored ...
— Prince Fortunatus • William Black

... you are gone, dear Chaise! Ah well; it was enough— The ways were cold, the ways were rough, O Heaven! O home! No more to roam, Chaise, poor Chaise! And now it's all so plain, dear Chaise! So plain— The 'wildered brain, The joy, the pain The phantom shapes that haunted, The half-born thoughts that daunted: All, all is plain, Dear Chaise! ...
— The Little Manx Nation - 1891 • Hall Caine

... Bird! fly away home— Good luck if you reach it at last: The owl's come abroad, and the bat's on the roam, Sharp set from ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction. - Volume 10, No. 270, Saturday, August 25, 1827. • Various

... Snap back, or that Whisker were a dog instead of a goat," said Bert. "But maybe if I let Whisker roam around the camp at night he'll be as ...
— The Bobbsey Twins on Blueberry Island • Laura Lee Hope

... there ain't room to have about. You an' Miss Trimble have happened on a kind of poor day, you know. Soon's I git me some stout shoes an' rubbers, as Mandy says, I can fetch home plenty o' little dry boughs o' pine; you remember I was always a great hand to roam in the woods? If we could only have a front room, so 't we could look out on the road an' see passin', an' was shod for meetin', I don' know's we should complain. Now we're just goin' to give you what we've got, an' make out with a good welcome. ...
— A Country Doctor and Selected Stories and Sketches • Sarah Orne Jewett

... pretty sure to regret it, with a bitter sense of responsibility added, which you cannot feel if chance has chosen for you. I observe that people who own summer cottages are often apt to wish they did not, and were foot-loose to roam where they listed, and I have been told that even a yacht is not a source of unmixed content, though so eminently detachable. To great numbers Europe looks from this shore like a safe refuge from the American ...
— Henry James, Jr. • William Dean Howells

... Inciting his eyes roam about the place, Selwyn noticed a group of six or seven subalterns surrounding a Staff officer, the whole party indulging in explosive merriment apparently over the quips of the betabbed gentleman in the centre. Selwyn ...
— The Parts Men Play • Arthur Beverley Baxter

... praise of Nero leaves me cold: Poems of porphyry and of gold, Palatial poems, chill my heart. I gaze—I wonder—I depart. Not to Byzantium would I roam In quest of beauty, nor Babylon; Nor do I seek Sahara's sun To blind me to the hills of home. Here am I native; here the skies Burn not, the sea I know is grey; Wanly the winter sunset dies. Wanly comes day. Yet on these ...
— The Advance of English Poetry in the Twentieth Century • William Lyon Phelps

... let it be known that, though in future it would be necessary to draw lines about his encampment, station guards, and allow entrance only by written permit, on this first day the public were welcome to roam among the tents and satisfy their curiosity. His company might be stationed here for some months to come, and he wished to start on neighbourly terms. He had been told, moreover, that Polpier as a recruiting-ground was virgin soil. His sappers were instructed, therefore, to make every ...
— Nicky-Nan, Reservist • Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch (Q)

... shifting on the eye; A zig-zag lightning-flash amid the elemental strife— Yea! each and all are emblems of man's transitory life! Brightness dawns on us at our birth—the dear small world of home, A tiny paradise from which our wishes never roam, Till boyhood's widening circle brings its myriad hopes and fears, The guileless faith that never doubts—the friendship ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine — Volume 54, No. 335, September 1843 • Various

... that vector, steering away from the ports. Why should they? As far as I know it's never been tried since Terraport was laid out. It'll be tricky—" And he himself would have to bear most of the responsibility for it. "But I believe that it can be done. And we can't just roam around out here. With I-S out for our blood and a Patrol warn-off it won't do us any good to head ...
— Plague Ship • Andre Norton

... He lift his brand, nor cared though oft she prayed, And she her form to other shape did change; Such monsters huge when men in dreams are laid Oft in their idle fancies roam and range: Her body swelled, her face obscure was made, Vanished her garments, her face and vestures strange, A giantess before him high she stands, Like Briareus ...
— Jerusalem Delivered • Torquato Tasso



Words linked to "Roam" :   vagabond, travel, range, maunder, move, jazz around, locomote, swan, tramp, wander, go, rove, stray, drift, roll, cast



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