Dictonary.netDictonary.net
Synonyms, antonyms, pronunciation

  Home
English Dictionary      examples: 'day', 'get rid of', 'New York Bay'




Line   Listen
noun
Line  n.  
1.
A linen thread or string; a slender, strong cord; also, a cord of any thickness; a rope; a hawser; as, a fishing line; a line for snaring birds; a clothesline; a towline. "Who so layeth lines for to latch fowls."
2.
A more or less threadlike mark of pen, pencil, or graver; any long mark; as, a chalk line.
3.
The course followed by anything in motion; hence, a road or route; as, the arrow descended in a curved line; the place is remote from lines of travel.
4.
Direction; as, the line of sight or vision.
5.
A row of letters, words, etc., written or printed; esp., a row of words extending across a page or column.
6.
A short letter; a note; as, a line from a friend.
7.
(Poet.) A verse, or the words which form a certain number of feet, according to the measure. "In the preceding line Ulysses speaks of Nausicaa."
8.
Course of conduct, thought, occupation, or policy; method of argument; department of industry, trade, or intellectual activity. "He is uncommonly powerful in his own line, but it is not the line of a first-rate man."
9.
(Math.) That which has length, but not breadth or thickness.
10.
The exterior limit of a figure, plat, or territory; boundary; contour; outline. "Eden stretched her line From Auran eastward to the royal towers Of great Seleucia."
11.
A threadlike crease marking the face or the hand; hence, characteristic mark. "Though on his brow were graven lines austere." "He tipples palmistry, and dines On all her fortune-telling lines."
12.
Lineament; feature; figure. "The lines of my boy's face."
13.
A straight row; a continued series or rank; as, a line of houses, or of soldiers; a line of barriers. "Unite thy forces and attack their lines."
14.
A series or succession of ancestors or descendants of a given person; a family or race; as, the ascending or descending line; the line of descent; the male line; a line of kings. "Of his lineage am I, and his offspring By very line, as of the stock real."
15.
A connected series of public conveyances, and hence, an established arrangement for forwarding merchandise, etc.; as, a line of stages; an express line.
16.
(Geog.)
(a)
A circle of latitude or of longitude, as represented on a map.
(b)
The equator; usually called the line, or equinoctial line; as, to cross the line.
17.
A long tape, or a narrow ribbon of steel, etc., marked with subdivisions, as feet and inches, for measuring; a tapeline.
18.
(Script.)
(a)
A measuring line or cord. "He marketh it out with a line."
(b)
That which was measured by a line, as a field or any piece of land set apart; hence, allotted place of abode. "The lines are fallen unto me in pleasant places; yea, I have a goodly heritage."
(c)
Instruction; doctrine. "Their line is gone out through all the earth."
19.
(Mach.) The proper relative position or adjustment of parts, not as to design or proportion, but with reference to smooth working; as, the engine is in line or out of line.
20.
The track and roadbed of a railway; railroad.
21.
(Mil.)
(a)
A row of men who are abreast of one another, whether side by side or some distance apart; opposed to column.
(b)
The regular infantry of an army, as distinguished from militia, guards, volunteer corps, cavalry, artillery, etc.
22.
(Fort.)
(a)
A trench or rampart.
(b)
pl. Dispositions made to cover extended positions, and presenting a front in but one direction to an enemy.
23.
pl. (Shipbuilding) Form of a vessel as shown by the outlines of vertical, horizontal, and oblique sections.
24.
(Mus.) One of the straight horizontal and parallel prolonged strokes on and between which the notes are placed.
25.
(Stock Exchange) A number of shares taken by a jobber.
26.
(Trade) A series of various qualities and values of the same general class of articles; as, a full line of hosiery; a line of merinos, etc.
27.
The wire connecting one telegraphic station with another, or the whole of a system of telegraph wires under one management and name.
28.
pl. The reins with which a horse is guided by his driver. (U. S.)
29.
A measure of length; one twelfth of an inch.
Hard lines, hard lot. (See Def. 18.)
Line breeding (Stockbreeding), breeding by a certain family line of descent, especially in the selection of the dam or mother.
Line conch (Zool.), a spiral marine shell (Fasciolaria distans), of Florida and the West Indies. It is marked by narrow, dark, revolving lines.
Line engraving.
(a)
Engraving in which the effects are produced by lines of different width and closeness, cut with the burin upon copper or similar material; also, a plate so engraved.
(b)
A picture produced by printing from such an engraving.
Line of battle.
(a)
(Mil. Tactics) The position of troops drawn up in their usual order without any determined maneuver.
(b)
(Naval) The line or arrangement formed by vessels of war in an engagement.
Line of battle ship. See Ship of the line, below.
Line of beauty (Fine Arts),an abstract line supposed to be beautiful in itself and absolutely; differently represented by different authors, often as a kind of elongated S (like the one drawn by Hogarth).
Line of centers. (Mach.)
(a)
A line joining two centers, or fulcra, as of wheels or levers.
(b)
A line which determines a dead center. See Dead center, under Dead.
Line of dip (Geol.), a line in the plane of a stratum, or part of a stratum, perpendicular to its intersection with a horizontal plane; the line of greatest inclination of a stratum to the horizon.
Line of fire (Mil.), the direction of fire.
Line of force (Physics), any line in a space in which forces are acting, so drawn that at every point of the line its tangent is the direction of the resultant of all the forces. It cuts at right angles every equipotential surface which it meets. Specifically (Magnetism), a line in proximity to a magnet so drawn that any point in it is tangential with the direction of a short compass needle held at that point.
Line of life (Palmistry), a line on the inside of the hand, curving about the base of the thumb, supposed to indicate, by its form or position, the length of a person's life.
Line of lines. See Gunter's line.
Line of march. (Mil.)
(a)
Arrangement of troops for marching.
(b)
Course or direction taken by an army or body of troops in marching.
Line of operations, that portion of a theater of war which an army passes over in attaining its object.
Line of sight (Firearms), the line which passes through the front and rear sight, at any elevation, when they are sighted at an object.
Line tub (Naut.), a tub in which the line carried by a whaleboat is coiled.
Mason and Dixon's line, Mason-Dixon line, the boundary line between Pennsylvania and Maryland, as run before the Revolution (1764-1767) by two English astronomers named Charles Mason and Jeremiah Dixon. In an extended sense, the line between the free and the slave States; as, below the Mason-Dixon line, i.e. in the South.
On the line,
(a)
on a level with the eye of the spectator; said of a picture, as hung in an exhibition of pictures.
(b)
at risk (dependent upon success) in a contest or enterprise; as, the survival of the company is on the line in this project.
Right line, a straight line; the shortest line that can be drawn between two points.
Ship of the line, formerly, a ship of war large enough to have a place in the line of battle; a vessel superior to a frigate; usually, a seventy-four, or three-decker; called also line of battle ship or battleship.
To cross the line, to cross the equator, as a vessel at sea.
To give a person line, to allow him more or less liberty until it is convenient to stop or check him, like a hooked fish that swims away with the line.
Water line (Shipbuilding), the outline of a horizontal section of a vessel, as when floating in the water.






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








Advanced search
     Find words:
Starting with
Ending with
Containing
Matching a pattern  

Synonyms
Antonyms
Quotes
Words linked to  

only single words



Share |





"Line" Quotes from Famous Books



... let no one in the room move. Watch the needles on the paper as the clockwork revolves the drums. I take a step—ever so lightly. The pendulums vibrate, and the needles trace a broken line on the paper on each drum. I stop; the lines are practically straight. I take another step and another, ever so lightly. See the delicate pendulums vibrate? See, the lines they trace ...
— The Silent Bullet • Arthur B. Reeve

... the breakdown of the clans and the general weakening of family bonds which had taken place. His ideal of social organization resembles organizations of merchants and craftsmen which we know only of later periods. His stress upon frugality, too, reflects a line of thought which is typical of businessmen. The rationality which can also be seen in his metaphysical ideas and which has induced modern Chinese scholars to call him an early materialist is fitting to an age in which a developing money economy and expanding trade required a cool, logical ...
— A history of China., [3d ed. rev. and enl.] • Wolfram Eberhard

... gradually, falling in the finest of flakes, and light as down itself. The average monthly snow-fall of the three winter months reduced to water, is but a little over half an inch, or about six inches of snow per month. A uniform line of low temperature—averaging near sixteen degrees, unbroken by thaws except under the occasional warm glare of a noonday sun—usually keeps this thin covering on the ground all winter so dry, that the deerskin moccasins, which many persons habitually wear, are scarcely moistened the ...
— Minnesota; Its Character and Climate • Ledyard Bill

... money in your purse and cut a dash;' eh, doctor? Not that I want to cut a dash. No, I'm going on the quiet line altogether now: I've done with all that sort ...
— Doctor Thorne • Anthony Trollope

... battlements, pyramids, obelisks, teeth, fangs, pincers, horns, cupolas; the mountain profile sinks, rises again, twists and sharpens itself in a thousand ways, but always so as to maintain an angular and serrated line. Only the inferior and secondary groups of mountains show any large curves or sweeping undulations of form. The Alps are more than an upheaval; they are a tearing and gashing of the earth's surface. Their granite peaks ...
— Amiel's Journal • Mrs. Humphry Ward

... window. So heavy was this that Harry would not allow the troopers to show themselves there, but posted them behind the barricades of stone against the gates so that, when these yielded, they might be able to open fire whilst showing only their heads over the top line of stones. ...
— At the Point of the Bayonet - A Tale of the Mahratta War • G. A. Henty

... Bay I spent in this exhilarating pastime. To it we added embellishments, multiplying excitements. A score of us would start at the same moment from the same line and race to shore; we would carry two on a board; we would stand and kneel and direct our course so that we could touch a marked spot on the beach or curve about and swerve and jostle each other. Exploding Eggs was the king of us all, and Teata was ...
— White Shadows in the South Seas • Frederick O'Brien

... the table, a bright ray of light from the full moon illuminated and seemed to point out to him a sheet of paper. On this paper he read the following line written that very morning, in large letters, by the eldest of the ...
— Les Miserables - Complete in Five Volumes • Victor Hugo

... examined the figure it supported. There could be no doubt about the features of either; he recollected the exact expression they had worn at different passages of their conversation, and recognised in every line and lineament the Giants of the night. Assured that it was no vision, but that he had heard and seen with his own proper senses, he walked forth, determining at all hazards to conceal himself in the Guildhall again that evening. He further resolved to sleep all day, so that he might ...
— Master Humphrey's Clock • Charles Dickens

... "That's more in your line, my lad. Tak' my advice and join the pilots. Ye'll do better as a pilot than anything else. It's in your blood. As for the Falcon, I said when you came aboard us that you could easily leave if you chanced upon ...
— The Pilots of Pomona • Robert Leighton

... information in Esperanto about the various things they might first need to know on arriving at those cities. For instance, here is Milan, Italy, and Poitiers, France, and Insbruck. Austria, and Tavia, Italy, and Davos, Switzerland, and so on. In the same line here are 20 more elaborate guidebooks to various towns in Europe, published entirely in Esperanto by the local authorities. Of course, you will not have the time to look at all these things just now, but I will leave them with you. Then, again, I think I can safely say that there ...
— Esperanto: Hearings before the Committee on Education • Richard Bartholdt and A. Christen

... companion directly above it. The star gave a bluish light, like moonlight, that shone downwards from far over the mountain. The great, solemn, silent wall of mountains, that stood round about the pass, were so clear-cut at the sky line, that one could count every summit; in the pass itself there was still a soft light, so that a part of the road was visible in the midst of the darkness, and the surface of one of the lakes lay glistening through ...
— The German Classics of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries - Masterpieces of German Literature Vol. 19 • Various

... his position very slightly, Garret was able to see that he was bending over a book which lay open beneath the rush light, and that with his forefinger he was pointing slowly along the line. ...
— For the Faith • Evelyn Everett-Green

... starrier light, And with its moonbright breath Blessed life for death's sake, and for life's sake death. Till as the moon's own beam and breath confuse In one clear hueless haze of glimmering hues The sea's line and the land's line and the sky's, And light for love of darkness almost dies, As darkness only lives for light's dear love, Whose hands the web of night is woven of, So in that heaven of wondrous words were life And death brought out of strife; Yea, by that strong spell ...
— Songs of the Springtides and Birthday Ode - Taken from The Collected Poetical Works of Algernon Charles - Swinburne—Vol. III • Algernon Charles Swinburne

... and return the same evening; two others were directed to bring in the meat we had killed last evening, while I proceeded down the river with one man in order to take a view of the confluence of this great river with the Missouri, which we found to be two miles distant on a direct line N. W. from our encampment. the bottom land on the lower side of the yellowstone river near it's mouth for about one mile in width appears to be subject to inundation; while that on the opposite side of the Missouri and the point formed ...
— The Journals of Lewis and Clark • Meriwether Lewis et al

... in his MSS. preserved in the Bodleian Library, calls Whiting "Homo sane candidissimus et amicus meus singularis," but he afterwards scored the line with his pen. See Arch Bodl. A. Dugdale Monast. vol. ...
— Bibliomania in the Middle Ages • Frederick Somner Merryweather

... and haulin' ain't much in my line," returned the old man, again cautious; "but after all, I reckon that there'd be less damage to my property if I looked after it myself. Of course, I'd have to have a profit for handlin' it. I'd feel like holdin' out for—for—" ...
— The Early Bird - A Business Man's Love Story • George Randolph Chester

... of work had already met me, would be my place to await whatever might next occur. Before returning to town however I had every reason to sally forth in search of Mrs. Meldrum, from whom, in so many months, I had not had a line, and my view of whom, with the adjacent objects, as I had left them, had been intercepted by a ...
— Embarrassments • Henry James

... no combination of events for which the wit of man cannot conceive an explanation. Simply as a mental exercise, without any assertion that it is true, let me indicate a possible line of thought. It is, I admit, mere imagination; but how often is imagination the ...
— The Valley of Fear • Arthur Conan Doyle

... themselves dishonored even whilst they are oppressed. I must confess I am touched with a sorrow mixed with some indignation, at the conduct of a few men, once of great rank, and still of great character, who, deluded with specious names, have engaged in a business too deep for the line of their understanding to fathom,—who have lent their fair reputation and the authority of their high-sounding names to the designs of men with whom they could not be acquainted, and have thereby made their very virtues operate to ...
— The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, Vol. III. (of 12) • Edmund Burke

... desert." But there is danger in this seclusion. "Now and then a man exquisitely made can live alone and must; but coop up most men and you undo them.—Here again, as so often, Nature delights to put us between extreme antagonisms, and our safety is in the skill with which we keep the diagonal line.—The conditions are met, if we keep our independence yet do not lose ...
— Ralph Waldo Emerson • Oliver Wendell Holmes

... distant about five miles from the long line of railway which binds together with iron bands the cities of New York and Boston. Only when the wind was strongly that way could the monotonous noise of the railway-train be heard, as the iron monster, with its heavy burden, ...
— Frank's Campaign - or the Farm and the Camp • Horatio Alger, Jr.

... back to camp and give the alarm. The huge battle-line is ready. Long rows of giant tuskers stand with swaying heads, each with his howdah beside him—towering brutes such as the old kings of Asia rode into battle, to the terror of their enemies. The herds of disdainful camels are kneeling in roaring protest ...
— McClure's Magazine, Vol. 31, No. 1, May 1908 • Various

... wind just now. You see how the papers stand. I happen to know where there's any quantity of money coming into the game from big financial quarters who have no use for this railroad man. It's a solid La Salle and Dearborn Street line-up, so far as I can see. Why, I don't know. But so it is. Maybe you know better than I do. Anyhow, that's the way it stands now. Add to that the fact that there are eight naturally Republican wards ...
— The Titan • Theodore Dreiser

... the one drawn from their notable location, almost opposite this hemisphere of Espaa. Consequently, some think that Manila is the antipodes of Sevilla. Although according to the latitude of the world that is not exact—as it is in a different latitude from that required to be opposite by a straight line which passes through the center of the earth—according to the longitude the idea is not so far wrong; for although both cities are not on one great circle, their meridians lack only a difference of two or three hours to be diametrically opposite. From this it follows that, as the world ...
— The Philippine Islands, 1493-1898 (Vol 27 of 55) • Various

... San Antonio very long after this but started northwards. You see it was getting to be warm weather. The first place I struck was a night job in a smashing good town up near the south line of the pan handle. I quit working at midnight, and to get to my boarding house had to walk a mile through a portion of the ...
— Danger Signals • John A. Hill and Jasper Ewing Brady

... of the same year, [Footnote: The anachronism referred to in the Preface. The events here described, occurred in 1812, and not in 1813.] a numerous body of Americans, principally troops of the line, had been collected under the orders of General Van Ransaellar, and advantage was taken of a dark night in October to push them across the river, with a view to the occupation of the commanding heights above the ...
— The Canadian Brothers - or The Prophecy Fulfilled • John Richardson

... the Regular school; I say it because a candid survey of what has been accomplished, and by whom, proves it. But as to diet, we have done little compared with what we should do. We have made no greater progress along this line because so many of us have been blinded by prejudice—the curse of the ...
— How to Eat - A Cure for "Nerves" • Thomas Clark Hinkle

... of the last Legislature of Tennessee. The mother of these children afterwards married Mr. James Sanders, of Sumner county, Tennessee, and is still enjoying good health. She is the only daughter of Gen. Daniel Smith, who was one of the surveyors of the line between Virginia and North Carolina, and succeeded Gen. Jackson in the Senate of ...
— Americanism Contrasted with Foreignism, Romanism, and Bogus Democracy in the Light of Reason, History, and Scripture; • William Gannaway Brownlow

... remainder in bushel baskets. No important difference could be noted in the two lots on their arrival in Washington. The James variety arrived in perfect condition in both packages; of the Eden 30 per cent and of the Thomas 35 per cent had shelled. More extensive experiments along this line are contemplated." ...
— Manual of American Grape-Growing • U. P. Hedrick

... Obstinate reviling. 'He warily retraces his steps'; and there is Christian, posting through the plain, terror and speed in every muscle. 'Mercy yearns to go' shows you a plain interior with packing going forward, and, right in the middle, Mercy yearning to go—every line of the girl's figure yearning. In 'The Chamber called Peace' we see a simple English room, bed with white curtains, window valance and door, as may be found in many thousand unpretentious houses; but far off, through the open window, we behold the sun uprising out of ...
— Lay Morals • Robert Louis Stevenson

... here, Crowle, remember about steering. You pull the right line if you want to go to the right and the other if you want to go to ...
— The White Feather • P. G. Wodehouse

... located, it struck me that here I'd found just what I was looking for. The ranch wasn't too near the town, and yet it wasn't too far from the railroad, and I took the trouble to find out if the railroad branch line I'd have to use had good cattle pens and loading chutes. Lots of ...
— The Boy Ranchers in Death Valley - or Diamond X and the Poison Mystery • Willard F. Baker

... take for farming purposes all the embankments on the Northern line, in order to plant potatoes there, or else to organise on the boulevards a monster cavalcade in which the celebrities of the period would figure. He would let all the windows, which would, at the rate of three francs for each person, produce a handsome profit. In short, ...
— Sentimental Education, Volume II - The History of a Young Man • Gustave Flaubert

... pace than at first, when, by the appearance of the sun in the sky, I saw that it must be noon. I now once more called a halt, for I felt tired myself, and was afraid that Natty must be equally so. We had for some time been crossing the open prairie, steering, by the sun and the distant line of mountain, as I hoped in the right direction. Before us lay a thick wood. Natty proposed that we should take shelter within it, as, even should the natives closely pursue us, we might there have the prospect of remaining ...
— In the Wilds of Africa • W.H.G. Kingston

... bought a stock of newspapers at a sidewalk news-stand; his hours of loneliness in his little room the day before had tortured him mentally. He sat himself down and read them. The news that the Vose line had gone into the steamship combination was interesting and significant. Evidently the Montana's lay-up had discouraged the mass of stockholders. He had time to kill and thoughts to stifle; he ...
— Blow The Man Down - A Romance Of The Coast - 1916 • Holman Day

... feeling I must say that nobody does it. Halfway down the street a side alley runs to the right, called Calle de Cervantes, and into this we turned to find the birthplace of the romancer. On one side was a line of squalid, quaint, gabled houses, on the other a long garden wall. We walked under the shadow of the latter and stared at the house-fronts, looking for an inscription we had heard of. We saw in sunny doorways mothers oiling into obedience ...
— Castilian Days • John Hay

... in the air smoothly and quietly, and moving slowly to the throb of the engine athwart the aeronautic park. Down below it stretched, dimly geometrical in the darkness, picked out at regular intervals by glow-worm spangles of light. One black gap in the long line of grey, round-backed airships marked the position from which the Vaterland had come. Beside it a second monster now rose softly, released from its bonds and cables into the air. Then, taking a beautifully exact distance, a third ascended, ...
— The War in the Air • Herbert George Wells

... departure of the unpopular minister. The public fermentation subsided; the patriot lords reappeared at court; and the Prince of Orange acquired an increasing influence in the council and over the stadtholderess, who by his advice adopted a conciliatory line of conduct—a fallacious but still a temporary hope for the nation. But the calm was of short duration. Scarcely was this moderation evinced by the government, when Philip, obstinate in his designs, and outrageous in his resentment, sent ...
— Holland - The History of the Netherlands • Thomas Colley Grattan

... months ago I received an interesting letter and paper from your brother, who has taken up a new and good line of investigation, viz., the adaptation in insects ...
— More Letters of Charles Darwin Volume II - Volume II (of II) • Charles Darwin

... ground to which to tie the horses, and the quartermasters were going about the streets just as if they were at home, showing officers and men to their quarters. Here were green ammunition boxes in a line, the company's carts, horses, and cauldrons in which buckwheat porridge was being cooked. Here were the captain and the lieutenant and the sergeant-major, Onisim Mikhaylovich, and all this was in the Cossack village ...
— The Cossacks • Leo Tolstoy

... were apprehensive of exposing their sureties. On this being represented to the legislature, an act was passed, extending the prison bounds, until the first of May following, so as to include Jackson's line." ...
— The American Quarterly Review, No. 17, March 1831 • Various

... second bow of Indra, incessantly drawn to a circle. Shafts issued continuously from it seemed to fill the welkin. With those straight arrows, equipped with wings of gold, shot by Bhima, a continuous line was made in the sky that looked effulgent like a garland of gold. Then those showers of (Karna's) arrows spread in the welkin, struck by Bhimasena with his shafts, were scattered in portions and fell down on the earth. Then the sky was covered with those showers of gold-winged and swiftly-coursing ...
— The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 2 • Kisari Mohan Ganguli

... now I can get on," and with wonderful celerity Sam scraped away with light hand till the last line of lather was taken off, a touch or two here and there given with the brush, and this fresh soap removed, after which the razor was closed, sponge and water applied, and a clean towel handed to the Sheikh, who received it with a grave smile and nod ...
— In the Mahdi's Grasp • George Manville Fenn

... known its theaters when the footlight favorites were Lotta and Jo Emmet, and when the incomparable Booth and Jefferson had held audiences spellbound at Ford's and at Albaugh's. He had known Charles Street before it was extended, and he had known its Sunday parade. He had known the Bay Line Boats, the harbor and the noisy streets that led to the wharves. He had known Lexington Market on Saturday afternoons; the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad in the heyday of its importance, and more than all he had known the beauties and belles of old Baltimore, and it added piquancy ...
— Mistress Anne • Temple Bailey

... the truth is of serious importance to us we dare not obstruct it by phrase- making: we are compelled to be as direct as our inherited feebleness will permit. The cannon ball's path is near to a straight line in proportion to its velocity. "My boy," my father once said to me, "if you write anything you consider particularly fine, strike ...
— The Early Life of Mark Rutherford • Mark Rutherford

... of the musicians, such as the case of Liszt, who twice eloped with married women and discussed the formality of divorce afterward, that through the long and ardent and greatly tormented love story of the Schumanns there never appears a line in any of their multitudinous letters which shows or hints the faintest dream of any procedure but the most upright. Always they encouraged each other with ringing beautiful changes on the one theme of their lives: Be true to me as I am true ...
— The Love Affairs of Great Musicians, Volume 2 • Rupert Hughes

... melancholy island there is a spot at which it is possible still to realize what Venice was like when S. Mark's campanile fell, for one has the S. Giorgio campanile and this other so completely in line that S. ...
— A Wanderer in Venice • E.V. Lucas

... it, on this day Tai-jui was, on account of business, compelled to go home; and having left them as a task no more than a heptameter line for an antithetical couplet, explaining that they should find a sentence to rhyme, and that the following day when he came back, he would set them their lessons, he went on to hand the affairs connected with the class ...
— Hung Lou Meng, Book I • Cao Xueqin

... camp at dark last evening. Shields's command is there, but it is so worn that he cannot move before Monday morning, the 26th. We have so thinned our line to get troops for other places that it was broken yesterday at Front Royal, with a probable loss to us of one regiment infantry, two Companies cavalry, putting General Banks ...
— The Papers And Writings Of Abraham Lincoln, Complete - Constitutional Edition • Abraham Lincoln

... left the bar at once; and crossed to the sleeping room. Steve and I followed softly, and behind us several more strung out in an expectant line. "What is this going to be?" they inquired curiously of each other. And upon learning the great novelty of the event, they clustered with silence intense outside the door where the Virginian ...
— The Virginian - A Horseman Of The Plains • Owen Wister

... record distance; in shot-putting there are Sheridan, Horgan, John Flanagan, and others bearing true Irish names, who are right in front; and before their time we had a redoubted champion in W.J.M. Barry. All previous performances in the shot-putting line have, however, been recently eclipsed by Patrick J. McDonald, of the Irish-American Club, who at Celtic Park, Long Island, on May 30, 1914, made a new world's record by putting the 18-pound shot 46 feet 2-3/4 inches. The climax of achievement was reached when T.F. Kiely won the ...
— The Glories of Ireland • Edited by Joseph Dunn and P.J. Lennox

... then threw the piece of tobacco out of the open window, and taking Oscar's writing-book, told him he would set a new copy for him. He soon returned, with the following line written upon the top of a ...
— Oscar - The Boy Who Had His Own Way • Walter Aimwell

... appreciate what little Arabian Nights I was able to introduce. I bought that screen," he indicated a sweep of Chinese line and color, "with my eye on you, and that Aladdin's lamp is yours, of course. You're to come in here and rub it whenever you like, and your heart's desire will ...
— Turn About Eleanor • Ethel M. Kelley

... unhappy region. At the opening of 1864 the effective Confederate lines drew an irregular zigzag across the map from a point in northern Georgia not far below Chattanooga to Mobile. Though small Confederate commands still operated bravely west of this line, the whole of Mississippi and a large part of Alabama were beyond aid from Richmond. But the average man did not grasp the situation. When a region is dominated by mobile armies the appearance of things to the civilian is deceptive. Because the powerful Federal armies of the ...
— The Day of the Confederacy - A Chronicle of the Embattled South, Volume 30 In The - Chronicles Of America Series • Nathaniel W. Stephenson

... second book from his pen, singled out for purposes of parade what they regarded as the most powerful element in his work, namely, his grasp upon the emotions of men, his ability to arouse and sway their feelings. In the long line of men of letters of the Anglo-Saxon race we find no counterpart of Mr. Dixon. So the question is very pertinent as to what influence has given power to this pale-face shout exciter, this expert player upon men's emotions, ...
— The Hindered Hand - or, The Reign of the Repressionist • Sutton E. Griggs

... write to himself] will adorn his head with the laurels they have stuck in his pocket. I wish Monsieur your Son abundance of honor and glory without wounds, and to you, Madame, unalterable health. The King of Prussia has written me a very touching Letter [one line of which we have read]; but I have always Madame Denis's adventure on my heart," at Frankfurt yonder. "If I were well, I would take a run to Frankfurt myself on the business,"—now that Soubise's reserves are in those parts, and could ...
— History of Friedrich II. of Prussia, Vol. XVIII. (of XXI.) - Frederick The Great—Seven-Years War Rises to a Height.—1757-1759. • Thomas Carlyle

... least," Roderick rejoined, "he will have been a great man!" At this moment the figure sank beneath the horizon line and became invisible in the uncertain light. Suddenly Roderick said, "I would like to see her once more—simply to look ...
— Roderick Hudson • Henry James

... the uninitiated to realise the value of certain concessions obtained for the British by Sir Arthur Hardinge, such as, for instance, the new land telegraph line via Kerman Beluchistan to India. Of the petroleum concessions, of which one hears a great deal of late, I would ...
— Across Coveted Lands - or a Journey from Flushing (Holland) to Calcutta Overland • Arnold Henry Savage Landor

... pen, that I might not err ANIMO, {69} or of set purpose discolour each or any of the parts thereof, otherwise than in concealment. Haply there are some who will not approve of this modesty, but will censure it for pusillanimity, and, with the cunning artist, attempt to draw their line further out at length, and upon this of mine, which way (with somewhat more ease) it may be effected; for that the frame is ready made to their hands, and then haply I could draw one in the midst of theirs, but that modesty in me forbids the defacements in men departed, their posterity ...
— Travels in England and Fragmenta Regalia • Paul Hentzner and Sir Robert Naunton

... during seven days before either ventured to begin the attack; but at length the signal for battle was given by Abdalrahman, and the immense mass of the Saracen army rushed with fury on the Franks. But the heavy line of the Northern warriors remained like a rock, and the Saracens, during nearly the whole day, expended their strength in vain attempts to make any impression upon them. At length, about four o'clock in the afternoon, when Abdalrahman was preparing for a new and desperate ...
— Bulfinch's Mythology • Thomas Bulfinch

... near to the village of Blenheim, on the Danube, where the Marshal Tallard's quarters were; their line extending through, it may be a league and a half, before Lutzingen and up to a woody hill, round the base of which, and acting against the Prince of Savoy, were forty of his squadrons. Here was a village that the Frenchmen had burned, the wood being, in fact, ...
— Henry Esmond; The English Humourists; The Four Georges • William Makepeace Thackeray

... the History of New York and his two most famous short stories, Rip Van Winkle and The Legend of Sleepy Hollow. Although he is not the father of the modern short story, which travels like an airship by the shortest line to its destination, he is yet one of the great nineteenth-century story tellers. Some of his essays or papers, like Westminster Abbey, Stratford-on-Avon, and Christmas do not suffer ...
— History of American Literature • Reuben Post Halleck

... (principia) therefore turned round to face them (that is, turning its face to the north), and it is this direction which is expressed by transversus. Principia is the vanguard, because in a Roman legion the ten companies of principes formed the front line, while the hastati constituted the second, and the triarii the third. In this manner the principes here faced the enemy, while the other divisions of the army drew up behind ...
— De Bello Catilinario et Jugurthino • Caius Sallustii Crispi (Sallustius)

... ambiguous and bombastic replies. God would inspire him, he said, and at the approaching festival of the Virgin, at the august and sublime hour of holy communion, he expected to hear the voice of Jesus speaking to his heart and announcing the line of conduct he ought to follow. The abbe was afraid of betraying uneasiness, if he insisted on probing this "Christian mystery," so he returned with this answer, which was least of all calculated to reassure me. He did not ...
— Mauprat • George Sand

... Bauldie, and he liberated the feeling of the class, who understood that their enemy had been delivered into their hands, and that Peter McGuffie—their own Speug—had been the means thereof. Yet could it be the case? Yes! It was the very countenance, line by line, and the very clothes, piece by piece, though looking a trifle shabby, of the premier Bailie of Muirtown, and it was evident that he had been ...
— Young Barbarians • Ian Maclaren

... garden, whose fountains were now sunken and dry, its stone balustrades shattered, its flight of steps all warped, and its statues overthrown, patches of their whiteness gleaming amidst the dusky stretches of turf. Farther back, behind the blue line of a sheet of water, stretched a maze of fruit-trees; farther still rose towering woodland, its dusky, violet depths streaked with bands of light. It was a forest which had regained virginity, an endless stretch of tree-tops rising one above the other, tinged with yellowish green ...
— Abbe Mouret's Transgression - La Faute De L'abbe Mouret • Emile Zola

... sky was covered with clouds; the troubled, green sea, played with their craft, tossing it on its still tiny waves that broke over it in a shower of clear, salt drops. Far off, before the prow of the boat, appeared the yellow line of the sandy beach; back of the stern was the free and joyous sea, all furrowed by the troops of waves that ran up and down, already decked in their superb fringe of foam. In the far distance, ...
— Twenty-six and One and Other Stories • Maksim Gorky

... and sterns of their own ships, forming them thus into a compact body as soon as the fleets came within fighting distance, or within spears' throw. They appear to have fought principally from the forecastles; and to have used grappling irons for dragging a vessel out of the line, ...
— Heimskringla - The Chronicle of the Kings of Norway • Snorri Sturluson

... couple of slips of paper towards him, scribbled a line or two on each, handed them to Triffitt, and nodded ...
— The Herapath Property • J. S. Fletcher

... shall hereafter treat of it as such. I could see that he was young; I thought about my own age. He was very pale, without being at all sickly—indeed, health and vigour and extreme vivacity were implicit in every line and expressed in every act; he was clear-skinned, but almost colourless. The shadow under his chin, I remember, was bluish. His eyes were round, when not narrowed by that closeness of his scrutiny of me, and though probably brown, showed to be all black, with pupil indistinguishable ...
— Lore of Proserpine • Maurice Hewlett

... sleep was disturbed: a series of dreadfully realistic dreams danced through his brain. First he seemed to be standing upon a high mountain peak with eternal snows stretched all about him. He looked down, past the snow line, past the fir woods, into the depths of a lovely lake, far down in the valley below. It was a lake of liquid amber, and as he looked it seemed to become two lakes, and they were like two great eyes looking up at him and summoning him to ...
— Tales of Chinatown • Sax Rohmer

... a sad-eyed captive city watched. From the lower Mississippi, from the blue waters of the Gulf, from the long Atlantic swells, the ships looked to the land. All the blockading fleets, all the old line-of-battle ships, the screw-frigates, the corvettes, the old merchant steamers turned warrior, the strange new iron-clads and mortar boats, engaged in bottling up the Confederacy, they all looked for the fall of Richmond. There watched, too, the ram-fitted river boats, the double-enders, lurking ...
— The Long Roll • Mary Johnston

... by those American historians who have reviewed the records of their national struggle in a spirit of dispassionate criticism. We know that in the spring of 1780 Washington himself wrote that his troops were "constantly on the point of starving for want of provisions and forage." He saw "in every line of the army the most serious features of mutiny and sedition." Indeed he had "almost ceased to hope," for he found the country in general "in such a state of insensibility and indifference to its interests" ...
— Canada under British Rule 1760-1900 • John G. Bourinot

... of the head, which is applied generally by key-screws working through the iron ring which holds the vellum. There is a difference in the size of the drums to place at the command of the player the octave from F in the first space below the bass staff to F on the fourth line of the same staff. Formerly the purpose of the drums was simply to give emphasis, and they were then uniformly tuned to the key-note and fifth of the key in which a composition was set. Now they are tuned in many ways, not only to allow for the frequent change of keys, ...
— How to Listen to Music, 7th ed. - Hints and Suggestions to Untaught Lovers of the Art • Henry Edward Krehbiel

... out the only line of policy by which the English government of Ireland could be made successful or even possible. He said: 'To go to work by force will be chargeable, it is true; but if you will give the people justice and minister law among them, and exercise the sword of the sovereign, and put away the sword of ...
— The Land-War In Ireland (1870) - A History For The Times • James Godkin

... that I can help you to find one whom no one has ever excelled in this important line of business. There is a distant relation of my own, Miss Folly, who is wonderfully quick with her fingers, and makes all sorts of elegant things. Lady Fashion has her so often with her at her fine town-house, that it is clear that she regards Miss Folly almost in the light of a friend, and would ...
— The Crown of Success • Charlotte Maria Tucker

... starting my cross-country tractor line then, and had just made the run from Schiaparelli to Asaph Dome, which was not as nice as it is now but still pretty civilized for the time. They had eight or ten bars, taverns, and other amusements, and were already getting to be ...
— Fee of the Frontier • Horace Brown Fyfe

... unexpected sally of wit caused shrieks of laughter, and mightily tickled all the hearers, except Champion ipse, who was listening and disapproving at another window. He complained to the president. Then the ingenious Wardlaw, not having come down to us in a direct line from Bayard, committed a ...
— Foul Play • Charles Reade

... is seldom met with till two or three degrees south of the equator. Tornados are sure to be encountered in two or three degrees north of the line, and sometimes even four degrees. It is necessary to use the utmost diligence in getting well to the south, as in that consists the difference between a good and bad voyage, and the health of the men depend greatly on that circumstance. In passing ...
— A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Volume IX. • Robert Kerr

... inherent in itself, which power is finally overcome by the density of the atmosphere which impedes its progress, and the law of gravitation finally attracts it to the earth. These contending principles may be known by observing the curved line in which the ball moves from the cannon's mouth to the spot where it rests. But if there is no power in the ball, why does not the ball of cork discharged from the same gun with the same momentum, travel to the same distance, at the same rate? The action commences ...
— Lectures on Language - As Particularly Connected with English Grammar. • William S. Balch

... pays the bills, but dull, awful dull! Well, you may not believe it, but there's some women that think old George Babbitt isn't such a bad scout! They think he's not so bad-looking, not so bad that it hurts anyway, and he's got a pretty good line of guff, and some even think he shakes a darn wicked Walkover ...
— Babbitt • Sinclair Lewis

... that the best pity which they could show to those poor old fathers, daughters, and wives, was to keep them from the clutches of the Spanish soldiery; so they made no answer to the Glippers, save by this single line, which they wrote on a sheet of paper, and forwarded, like ...
— The Rise of the Dutch Republic, 1555-1566 • John Lothrop Motley

... and as hastily added to, altered, and transposed. They are a first draft for the fair copy which was never made. The difficulty of giving a true representation of them in print is increased by Aubrey's habit of inserting above the line alternatives to words or phrases without deleting the original words or even indicating his preference. In the present text the later form has, as a rule, been adopted, the other ...
— Characters from 17th Century Histories and Chronicles • Various

... the ceremonial respect which all Japanese have for the Throne that all through this long contest the main issue should have been purposely obscured. The traditional feelings of veneration which a loyal and obedient people feel for a line of monarchs, whose origin is lost in the mists of antiquity, are such that they have turned what is in effect an evergrowing struggle against the archaic principle of divine right into a contest with clan-leaders ...
— The Fight For The Republic In China • B.L. Putnam Weale

... her alone, Jim," responded the girl, now pale and grave as she had never been before, and looking from the body to the line of foaming water but a few feet beyond; "the tide might turn and take ...
— A Child of the Glens - or, Elsie's Fortune • Edward Newenham Hoare

... opportunity to say anything then, for encountering the little cavalcade just as the wachtmeister led it up to the police station, he opened his little twinkling eyes wide at the sight of the four dejected and most obvious prisoners, gave Dick a wink which expressed volumes, and made off in a bee line towards the telegraph station. There he sent a most innocent wire to a small retail tobacconist in Kimberley a wire that apparently conveyed nothing more than a complaint as to the quality of certain cigars that ...
— A Rip Van Winkle Of The Kalahari - Seven Tales of South-West Africa • Frederick Cornell

... Hamley thought it would be rather a throwing away of money, as he was so little likely to distinguish himself in intellectual pursuits; anything practical—such as a civil engineer—would be more the line of life for him. She thought that it would be too mortifying for him to go to the same college and university as his brother, who was sure to distinguish himself—and, to be repeatedly plucked, to come away wooden-spoon at last. But ...
— Wives and Daughters • Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell

... swayed back and forth across the narrow room, locked in a tight embrace. The Crouch woman was the larger and stronger, but her adversary was lithe and sinewy and as cool as a veteran in the line of battle. She succeeded in tripping the heavier woman, resorting to a new trick in wrestling that had just come into practice among athletic women, and they went to the floor with a crash, ...
— Her Weight in Gold • George Barr McCutcheon

... in this line, the early Spanish notices of the Maya mythology are so brief and confused that we can derive but little aid from them in our efforts to identify the deities figured in these manuscripts. Possibly ...
— Aids to the Study of the Maya Codices • Cyrus Thomas

... is next put in place and fastened with the catch, a. Finally, the spring is freed from the hook, f. When it is desired to bind the pages of a pamphlet, the latter is placed open on the support, g, which, as will be noticed, is angular above, so that the staple may enter exactly on the line of the fold. Then the handle, h, is shoved down so as to act on the arm, c, and cause the descent of the extremity, d, as well as the vertical piece, b, with which it engages. This latter, in its downward travel, takes up one of the staples, which are ...
— Scientific American Supplement, No. 362, December 9, 1882 • Various

... speculations, the tubes are abundantly strong to sustain the pressure of the heaviest trains, even were they to stand still in the middle of the bridge. It is calculated that each tube, in its weakest part, would sustain a pressure of four or five thousand tons, "support a line of battle ship, with all her munitions and stores on board," and "bear a line of locomotives covering the entire bridge." The bridge was completed, and the first train passed through it March 5th, 1850. The total cost of this gigantic ...
— Anecdotes of Painters, Engravers, Sculptors and Architects and Curiosities of Art (Vol. 3 of 3) • S. Spooner

... the shadow of the doorway, his eyes narrowed with anger, his thin lips compressed till they were merely a line. ...
— The Hippodrome • Rachel Hayward

... red against the darkening sky. A fringe of palms, beyond, showed where the river flowed, the river that watered the garden where the land was green and good. But the grim ramparts of Hit stretched like a line of fire between, forbidding and impassable. Higher and higher the shadows climbed till the tall minaret stood out alone, a sentinel and a flaming sword. A hundred sooty figures toiled ...
— A Dweller in Mesopotamia - Being the Adventures of an Official Artist in the Garden of Eden • Donald Maxwell

... must be screw-threaded) is screwed an ordinary gas pipe end. Heavy cords are then run through holes in the top piece and tied to the branches wherever needed—the same cord often being made to tie several branches which are in line perpendicularly. ...
— Trees, Fruits and Flowers of Minnesota, 1916 • Various

... which is mainly shelf-ice, known as the Great Ross Barrier. Confusion arose when "Barrier" came to be applied to the seaward ice-cliff (resting on rock) of an extensive sheet of land-ice and when it was also employed to designate a line of consolidated pack-ice. Spelt with a small "b" the term is a convenient one, so long as it carries its ordinary meaning; it seems unnecessary to ...
— The Home of the Blizzard • Douglas Mawson

... he would feel that a door had been opened for his spirit into a place of sweet imaginings, of wistful peace, bringing to him a hope of something that might assuredly be, some deep haven of God where the soul might float upon a golden tide. One day, for instance, two old line-engravings of Italian pictures which he had inherited, and which hung in his little library, gave him this sense; he had known them ever since he was a child, and they had never spoken to him before. Had they hung all these years patiently waiting for that moment? One was "The Betrothal of ...
— Beside Still Waters • Arthur Christopher Benson

... been witness to a series of pantomimic actions that interested him more than Amabel's conduct under this final examination. Frederick, who had evidently some request to make or direction to give, had sent a written line to the coroner, who, on reading it, had passed it over to Knapp, who a few minutes later was to be seen in conference with Agnes Halliday. As a result, the latter rose and left the room, followed by the detective. She was gone a half-hour, ...
— Agatha Webb • Anna Katharine Green

... Corollary V. formatted as headers. In the original, IV. and V. were out-of-line headers and I., II. and ...
— The Wonders of the Invisible World • Cotton Mather

... business;—more of a fool than even women generally are." To this Kate acceded with a little smile,—acknowledging that her understanding was limited. "I want to see Gogram," he said. "Do you write to him a line, telling him to come here to-day,—he or one of his men,—and send it at once by Peter." Gogram was an attorney who lived at Penrith, and who was never summoned to Vavasor Hall unless the Squire had something to say ...
— Can You Forgive Her? • Anthony Trollope

... to these you will need one large pocket on both right and left side of middy, below belt line, making in all three large and two small pockets. The belt is held in place by sliding it through loops sewed on the middy, one at the back and one on ...
— On the Trail - An Outdoor Book for Girls • Lina Beard and Adelia Belle Beard

... of red (top), white, and black with a large green five-pointed star centered in the white band; similar to the flags of Iraq, which has three stars, and Syria, which has two stars—all green and five-pointed in a horizontal line centered in the white band; also similar to the flag of Egypt, which has a symbolic eagle centered in the ...
— The 1990 CIA World Factbook • United States. Central Intelligence Agency

... Forbes is of opinion that there is the fullest evidence to prove that, even since the arrival of the Spaniards, a very considerable elevation of the land has taken place over the greater part, if not the whole extent, of the line of coast; while Darwin states that he has convincing proof that this part of the continent has been elevated from 400 to 1200 feet since the epoch of existing shells. Furthermore, elevations of the coast-line, amounting in many cases to several feet, are known to have happened within recent ...
— Manures and the principles of manuring • Charles Morton Aikman

... without success. Napoleon himself attempted in vain to win her to his court as maid of honor and as an ornament, her refusal incurring his anger, especially as she was the height of fashion and courted by all the great men of the age. Through her preference for the Royalists—persisting in her line of conduct in spite of her friend Fouche—she finally incurred the enmity of the emperor. Even the Princess Caroline endeavored to obtain Mme. Recamier's friendship for Napoleon, "but, although the princess gave her loge twice to the favorite, and upon each occasion the emperor went to the ...
— Women of Modern France - Woman In All Ages And In All Countries • Hugo P. Thieme

... following line, translated from Juvenal by Dr. Johnson, is much superior to the original, owing to the easy personification of Worth and Poverty, and to ...
— The Temple of Nature; or, the Origin of Society - A Poem, with Philosophical Notes • Erasmus Darwin

... thrust your arm into the fragrant pit, you have a better chance than ever before to become acquainted with your favorites by the sense of touch. How you feel for them, reaching to the right and left! Now you have got a Talman sweet; you imagine you can feel that single meridian line that divides it into two hemispheres. Now a greening fills your hand; you feel its fine quality beneath its rough coat. Now you have hooked a swaar, you recognize its full face; now a Vandevere or a King rolls down from the apex above and you bag it at once. ...
— Winter Sunshine • John Burroughs

... time only made her more perplexed. She waited a week, wrote at last, and as soon as her letter was fairly gone, thought of forty different ways of saying the thing better and more justly, dwelt again and again on each line that could convoy a false impression one way or the other, and reproached herself by turns for having spoken disadvantageously of her dear affectionate brother, and for not having let her cousin fairly see the full extent of the mischief. On ...
— The Two Guardians • Charlotte Mary Yonge

... that science (I mean the critical), as I once heard old obscene beastly Peter Pindar in a dispute on Milton say he thought that if he had reason to value himself upon one thing more than another it was in knowing what good verse was. Who lookd over your proof sheets, and left ordebo in that line of Virgil? ...
— The Works of Charles and Mary Lamb, Vol. 5 • Edited by E. V. Lucas

... striking appearance and outlandish voice challenges attention. He will be found to possess some gentlemanly traits. To illustrate, a number of blue jays were seen taking turns, waiting in line, to feed upon a bone where there was room for only one at a time. There was no scramble, no hurrying of the one who was eating. The blue jay is a most devoted parent, though not considered a good citizen by other birds. Contrary to the usual belief, he has ...
— Bird Day; How to prepare for it • Charles Almanzo Babcock

... gently disengaging the revolver barrel from the line of my waist, "but won't you tell me why you do ...
— The Way of a Man • Emerson Hough

... plain Welters in shallows, headlands crumble down, And the tide drifts the sea-sand in the streets Of the drowned city. Thou, meanwhile, afar In the green chambers of the middle sea, Where broadest spread the waters and the line Sinks deepest, while no eye beholds thy work, Creator! thou dost teach the coral-worm To lay his mighty reefs. From age to age, He builds beneath the waters, till, at last, His bulwarks overtop the brine, and check The long ...
— Poetical Works of William Cullen Bryant - Household Edition • William Cullen Bryant

... will bring you to the abode of poverty and suffering, a locality which contrasts strangely with the elegant thoroughfare we have just left. Cross Centre street, and continue your eastward course, and a few minutes will bring you to Park street. Turn short to the left, follow the line of Park street, and in a few minutes you will see that blessed beacon light in this great sea of human misery and sin, the "Five Points Mission." You are now fairly in the heart of the Five Points district. It is a horrible place, and you shudder as ...
— The Secrets Of The Great City • Edward Winslow Martin

... sideways. There was gratification, genuine, complacent gratification, visible in every line of ...
— The Loyalist - A Story of the American Revolution • James Francis Barrett

... in black and white, an ink other than black or white should be used to line the chart. Such an ink should be preferably translucent so that it will be possible to see the ridges which it traverses. A translucent carmine drawing ink serves well. In placing the lines on the chart, they should be arranged so that they ...
— The Science of Fingerprints - Classification and Uses • Federal Bureau of Investigation

... I steered to the northward, close-hauled, with the wind between N.E. and E., hardly ever having it to the southward of E., till after we had crossed the Line, and had got into N. latitudes. So that our course, made good, was always to the W. of N., and ...
— A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Volume 16 • Robert Kerr

... King of Prussia, who by his maxims and conduct, seemed to tread under foot all respect for natural law and every duty of humanity. Amongst the framed engravings, with which I had decorated my alcove at Montmorency, was a portrait of this prince, and under it a distich, the last line ...
— The Confessions of J. J. Rousseau, Complete • Jean Jacques Rousseau

... double line of windows on the second and the third stories peer the murky faces and towsled heads of some of the inmates. One of the latter spits his furthest into the yard—evidently with the intention of hitting myself: but all his efforts prove ...
— Through Russia • Maxim Gorky

... damp; hydrocyanic acid, cyanide, Prussic acid[ISA:chemsubcfp], hydrogen cyanide; marsh gas, nux vomica[Lat], ratsbane[obs3]. [poisonous plants] hemlock, hellebore, nightshade, belladonna, henbane, aconite; banewort[obs3], bhang, ganja[obs3], hashish; Upas tree. [list of poisonous substances(on-line)] Toxline. rust, worm, helminth[Med], moth, moth and rust, fungus, mildew; dry rot; canker, cankerworm; cancer; torpedo; viper &c. (evil doer) 913; demon &c. 980. [Science of poisons] toxicology. Adj. ...
— Roget's Thesaurus • Peter Mark Roget

... distance, belonging to an Acadian settlement. Crewe judged this to be the village of Beaubassin. The surmise was confirmed when, a few hours later, after a wide detour to avoid the settlement, the flag of France was seen waving over the foliage that clothed a long line of heights. By this time the band was traversing a vast expanse of salt marshes, and after crossing a little tidal stream near its head, they turned sharply southwestward toward the sea. Presently the raw red earthworks of Beausejour rose into view some seven or eight miles distant across the ...
— Earth's Enigmas - A Volume of Stories • Charles G. D. Roberts

... as a huge barometer to forecast the weather. "How is the mountain this morning?" the farmer asked in harvest time. "Has the mountain got his nightcap on?" the housewife inquired before her wash was hung on the line. The Indian would watch the mountain with intent to determine whether he might expect snass (rain), or kull snass (hail), or t'kope snass (snow), and seldom failed in his conclusions. So that day I scanned ...
— Ox-Team Days on the Oregon Trail • Ezra Meeker

... domestic toil. From the days of Lucretia, the great Roman dame whom we find spinning with her handmaidens deep into the night, and whose personal dignity was so dear to her that, violated, she sought only death, to those of the mother of the Gracchi, one of the last of the great line, we find everywhere, erect, labouring, and resolute, the Roman woman who gave birth to the men who built up Roman greatness. A few centuries later, and Rome also had reached that dangerous spot in ...
— Woman and Labour • Olive Schreiner

... field kitchen. But his life is too valuable to be risked in that way, and his personal Adjutant, von Plessen, who watches over his Majesty like a mother or a governess, won't let him go to the front often. His Majesty loves his soldiers and would be among them right up at the firing line if he were not constantly watched and kept in check by his devoted von Plessen." However, the Kaiser sleeps within earshot of the not very distant thunder of the German heavy artillery pounding away at Rheims, plainly heard ...
— The New York Times Current History of the European War, Vol 1, Issue 4, January 23, 1915 • Various

... her invectives against Creon, by which she provokes him to execute his tyrannical threats, display the immovable energy of manly courage. The poet has, however, discovered the secret of painting the loving heart of woman in a single line, when to the assertion of Creon, that Polynices was an enemy to his country, ...
— Lectures on Dramatic Art and Literature • August Wilhelm Schlegel

... outside the palisade, awaiting the defaulter. That day Tembinok' wore the woman's frock; as like as not, his make-up was completed by a pith helmet and blue spectacles. Conceive the glaring stretch of sand-hills, the dwarf palms with their noon-day shadows, the line of the palisade, the crone sentries (each by a small clear fire) cooking syrup on their posts—and this chimaera waiting with his deadly engine. To him, enter at last the cook, strolling down the sandhill from Equator Town, listless, vain and graceful; ...
— The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition Vol. 18 (of 25) • Robert Louis Stevenson

... but the horses. There they stood in a long restless line. A shout! and they were off. In the first wild scramble he could catch a sight of the colours on which his hopes depended near the front. On they came like the wind. A man near shouted the name of Tom's horse—"It's ...
— The Adventures of a Three-Guinea Watch • Talbot Baines Reed

... subjoined the following note: 'That this boundary could have been obtained was doubtless the belief of our minister; but the offer of the Spanish government was probably to the Colorado—certainly a line far west of ...
— Memoir of the Life of John Quincy Adams. • Josiah Quincy

... south. Beauregard would have been obliged either to fight him with inferior numbers or to shut himself up in the fortress of Vicksburg. As it was, Halleck spent the month of June merely in repairing the railway line which runs from Corinth in the direction of Chattanooga. When he was called to Washington he left Grant, who for several months past had been kept idle as his second in command, in independent command of a ...
— Abraham Lincoln • Lord Charnwood

... not be supposed that there were no interregni between the dominion of one slang phrase and another. They did not arise in one long line of unbroken succession, but shared with song the possession of popular favour. Thus, when the people were in the mood for music, slang advanced its claims to no purpose, and, when they were inclined for slang, the ...
— Memoirs of Extraordinary Popular Delusions - Vol. I • Charles Mackay

... success. The writing of "Marmion" was begun in November, 1806. Constable offered as publisher to pay at once a thousand guineas for the copyright, when he heard that the new poem was begun, though he had not yet seen a line of it. Miller and Murray joined, each taking a fourth part of the venture, and John Murray said, "We both view it as honourable, profitable, and glorious to be concerned in the publication of a new poem by Walter Scott." Scott, thirty-five years old, had the impulse upon his mind of a preceding ...
— Marmion: A Tale of Flodden Field • Walter Scott

... roused the chivalry of Jean Jacques. That the comely, careful Carmen should be party to an imposture was intolerable. Everything about her gave it the lie. Her body was so perfect and complete, so finely contrived and balanced, so cunningly curved with every line filled in; her eye was so full of lustre and half-melancholy too; her voice had such a melodious monotone; her mouth was so ripe and yet so distant in its luxury, that imposture was out of ...
— The Judgment House • Gilbert Parker

... at my wit's end, conscious besides that the paper was on a wrong line, and must somehow be got out of it—came the overtures from the Syndicate. I knew perfectly well I ought to have refused them—of course my whole career was risked by listening to them. But at the same time they gave me assurances ...
— Marcella • Mrs. Humphry Ward

... his tenth year, when he was sent to Wales to learn manners and grammar at the school of Mr. Owen ap Davies ap Jenkins ap Jones. This gentleman had reason to think himself the greatest of men; for he had over his chimney-piece a well-smoked genealogy, duly attested, tracing his ancestry in a direct line up to Noah; and moreover he was nearly related to the learned etymologist, who, in the time of Queen Elizabeth, wrote a folio to prove that the language of Adam and Eve in Paradise was pure Welsh. With such causes to be proud, Mr. ...
— Tales and Novels, Vol. IV • Maria Edgeworth

... book already on her desk, and she was so interested in trying to make a page of letters that would look exactly like those already drawn on the top line that she never looked up when the second grade had their arithmetic lesson at the blackboard. And when the bell rang for ...
— Four Little Blossoms at Oak Hill School • Mabel C. Hawley

... Peter's remark as a burglar from a policeman's bull's-eye. The bull's-eye seemed to cast a new light on Mary Ann, too, but he felt too unpleasantly dazzled to consider that for the moment; his whole thought was to get out of the line ...
— The Grey Wig: Stories and Novelettes • Israel Zangwill

... worse than any carnival Charley had ever seen. He made his way, harness and suitcase on his back, through the station crowds and out into the taxi ramp. A line of the new cabs stood there, and Charley managed to grab one inches ahead of a woman with a small, crying child in tow. He gestured to the driver with his head, and the door slid open. He stepped inside, released the catch that ...
— Charley de Milo • Laurence Mark Janifer AKA Larry M. Harris

... evaded this direct question. "An' you standin' in line for my job?" he said in pretended astonishment. "Why, I reckon you ought to be the most ...
— The Range Boss • Charles Alden Seltzer

... don't mean that!" and so on; but his astonishment always knocked his double eyeglass off, and, when he couldn't find it, it had to be recovered before he could say, "Eh—eh—what was that?" and get in line again; so he made ...
— Somehow Good • William de Morgan

... colonial Empire, so far as territory is concerned, is immensely superior to ours. Yet, in spite of all these considerations, the hostility of the English is primarily directed against us. It is necessary to adopt the English standpoint in order to understand the line of thought which guides the English politicians. I believe that the solution of the problem is to be found in the wide ramifications of English interests in every ...
— Germany and the Next War • Friedrich von Bernhardi

... blackened faces, armed with bows and arrows, to demand pay for grain lands that had been occupied by the whites. Gibbons acted as peacemaker, but told, "the fact that the brethren were all well armed appeared to pacify the Indians more than any arguments." The farmers formed in battle line, with Helaman Pratt as ...
— Mormon Settlement in Arizona • James H. McClintock

... is likely your reading and your music are gone from you," said Seaghan; and he made a little rann on him, saying it was a strange thing Duartane O'Duartane that had such a great name not to be able to read a line of a book, or even to remember one. But when the stranger heard how he was being mocked at, he took up the book, and read from the top to the bottom of the page very well and in a sweet-sounding voice. And after that he took the harp and played and sang the same ...
— Gods and Fighting Men • Lady I. A. Gregory

... I read this last line it does not convey much of a compliment, but I mean all that it implies. She certainly is very pretty. We made our excuses to her, and went to the club cafe, and I have not seen her since. She has gone to the city ...
— John Henry Smith - A Humorous Romance of Outdoor Life • Frederick Upham Adams

... to this song. "It's a queer thing to call that 'a further description of the church's graces'," he said to himself, and then his eye searched through the verses of the song until he reached the line, ...
— The Foolish Lovers • St. John G. Ervine



Words linked to "Line" :   line squall, crib, lay on the line, isogonal line, path, line of longitude, airline business, persuasion, accounting, isometric, scratch line, descender, goal line, railway line, single file, cross wire, starting line, shroud, part, WATS, track, spur track, work, electromagnetic spectrum, line of poetry, abidance, tag line, line printer, oil pipeline, words, run along, landline, connective, itinerary, sept, branch line, state line, chorus, musical phrase, skin, conformity, verse line, line-drive single, straight line, leitmotiv, text, railroad line, line-at-a-time printer, International Date Line, watershed, connection, area unit, theme song, current, bottom line, pipage, log line, fall in line, leitmotif, equinoctial line, in-line skate, sideline, contrast, line score, Rubicon, quarter-circle, line roulette, line of latitude, confectionery, front, curlicue, drop line, water level, transit line, personal line of credit, phrase, abstract thought, trip line, old-line, calling, piping, war machine, mooring, mill, communication channel, put on the line, line item, service line, front line, artefact, opening line, Siegfried line, transmission line, towline, electromagnetic delay line, demarcation line, bank line, reenforce, poverty line, lubber line, row, balkline, parentage, bloodline, consumer credit, transportation, Plantagenet line, waterline, line of scrimmage, petrol line, dateline, construct, geodesic line, timberline, quadrant, line of heart, off-line, electromagnetic radiation, reception line, royal line, power cable, communication, coaxial cable, gas line, power line, edge, military position, crease, short letter, squiggle, stepped line, railroad, farming, tucket, trolley line, casuistry, patter, armed forces, letter, military, line of destiny, situation, pipe, dividing line, colour line, cutis, scrimmage line, delineate, cable television service, railway, back channel, line organisation, channel, yard line, plural, field line, conveyer belt, line of least resistance, nock, line of vision, manufacturing plant, crinkle, county line, folk, isoclinic line, Alaskan pipeline, visible horizon, medium, actor's line, timber line, inter-group communication, hairline, catering, loop-line, connecter, metier, ancestry, phone system, telephone system, impression, melody, fence line, bitter end, pedigree, city line, factory, laniard, bar line, business, military machine, line storm, fill, railroad bed, contact, hard-line, form, hemline, serif, baulk-line, date line, draw, armed services, aclinic line, line worker, district line, distinction, lateral line, activity, magnetic equator, agate line, line of flight, A-line, red line, snow line, line of Saturn, carrier, dotted line, telephone line, accountancy



Copyright © 2020 Dictonary.net