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KO   Listen
verb
KO  v. t.  (past & past part. ko'd; pres. part. ko'ing)  To knock out; to deliver a blow that renders (the opponent) unconscious; used especially in boxing. (acronym)
Synonyms: knockout.






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"KO" Quotes from Famous Books



... ruffle a few tiles along the eaves of the houses, nothing serious had occurred. At one point, owing to the lateral spreading of an embankment, there had been a slight sinkage of the line, and we had to proceed with caution. Crossing the entrance to the beautiful lake of Hamana Ko, which tradition says was joined to the sea by the breaking of a sand-spit by the sea waves accompanying an earthquake in 1498, we rose from the rice fields and passed over a country of hill and rock. Further along the line signs ...
— Complete Story of the San Francisco Horror • Richard Linthicum

... species is the "ko-koon" of the natives. It approaches nearer to the brindled gnoo in form and habits; but as it is not found except in the more central and less-travelled portions of Africa, less is known about it than either of the others. ...
— Popular Adventure Tales • Mayne Reid

... of the gate called Ko-kamon of the Emperor's palace at Kyoto. Now there was a man, dwelling near that gate, whose name was Kino Momoye; and he ridiculed the characters which Kobodaishi had made, and pointed to one of them, saying: 'Why, it looks like a swaggering wrestler!' But the same night ...
— Glimpses of an Unfamiliar Japan - First Series • Lafcadio Hearn

... smell," by many who do not know whence or how it comes. Rolf did not smoke. He had promised his mother that he would not until he was a man, and something brought her back home now with overwhelming force; that was the beds they had made of fragrant balsam boughs. "Cho-ko-tung or blister tree" as Quonab called it. His mother had a little sofa pillow, brought from the North—a "northern pine" pillow they called it, for it was stuffed with pine needles of a kind not growing in Connecticut. Many a time had Rolf as a ...
— Rolf In The Woods • Ernest Thompson Seton

... to a horizontal position, first and second fingers joining and fully extending during the movement, and pointing forward—another, i.e., joined by another. Repeating this motion, he at the same time called out the name Ga-bi-wa-bi-ko-ke. ...
— Sign Language Among North American Indians Compared With That Among Other Peoples And Deaf-Mutes • Garrick Mallery

... element is present, and that there is no certainty of such proportions existing except in the crystal. I hold before you a crystal of common alum. Its chemical symbol would be Al{2}O{3},3SO{3}KO,SO{3}24H{2}O. If we knew its weight and wished to know its ultimate component parts, we could calculate them more readily than we could acquire that knowledge by any other means. But the elements of this quantity of uncrystallized alum could not be computed. Then we may define crystallization ...
— Scientific American Supplement, No. 344, August 5, 1882 • Various

... that there was something about it that seemed to suit a saucy pigeon, and, vastly pleased, he repeated over and over, "Chico, Chico," while Maria echoed softly "Chee-ko." ...
— Chico: the Story of a Homing Pigeon • Lucy M. Blanchard

... purpose of causing a combination which is soluble in water and acids, the operation is termed unclosing. These substances are particularly the silicates and the sulphates of the alkaline earths. The usual reagents resorted to for this purpose are carbonate of soda (NaO, CO^{2}), carbonate of potash (KO, CO^{2}), or still better, a mixture of the two in equal parts. In some cases we use the hydrate of barytes (BaO, HO) and the bisulphate of potash (KO, 2SO^{3}). The platinum spoon is generally ...
— A System of Instruction in the Practical Use of the Blowpipe • Anonymous

... a baker, and come when morning breaks, Calling out, "Beeay-ko!" (that's the sound he makes)— Riding in a rattle-cart that jogs and jolts and shakes, Selling all the sweetest things a baker ever bakes; Currant-buns and brandy-snaps, pastry all in flakes; But I wouldn't be a baker if . . . I couldn't eat the ...
— A Book for Kids • C. J. (Clarence Michael James) Dennis

... the ship were soon equally welcome: welcome to dip their fingers in the wooden dish, to drink cocoa-nuts, to share the circulating pipe, and to hear and hold high debate about the misdeeds of the French, the Panama Canal, or the geographical position of San Francisco and New Yo'ko. In a Highland hamlet, quite out of reach of any tourist, I have met the same ...
— The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition Vol. 18 (of 25) • Robert Louis Stevenson

... end of Yeddo runs the green welt of a table-land. Midway, at the base of this, tucked away from northern winds, hidden in green bamboo hedges, Kano lived, a mute protest against the new. Beside himself, of the household were Ume-ko, his only child, and an old ...
— The Dragon Painter • Mary McNeil Fenollosa

... B.A.—A Dictionary and Glossary of the Ko-ran. With Copious Grammatical References and Explanations of the Text. ...
— Fair Italy, the Riviera and Monte Carlo • W. Cope Devereux

... his works has been in constant use down to the present day. The T'UNG CHIH mentions "Lives of famous generals from the Chou to the T'ang dynasty" as written by him. [42] According to Ch'ao Kung-wu and the T'IEN-I-KO catalogue, he followed a variant of the text of Sun Tzu which differs considerably from those now extant. His notes are mostly short and to the point, and he frequently illustrates his remarks by anecdotes ...
— The Art of War • Sun Tzu

... long since extinct. In others the landscape presented the soft beauty of undulating, grove-like scenery, in which, amid a profusion of bright green herbage, there rose conspicuous the tall stems and waving plumes of the cocoanut palm; the superb and umbrageous ko-a, with its laurel-green leaves and sweet blossoms; the kukui, or candlenut tree; the fragrant sandal-wood, and a variety of other trees and shrubs for which there ...
— Gascoyne, The Sandal Wood Trader - A Tale of the Pacific • R. M. Ballantyne

... upon his vocation at last—he is a born pudding-maker. He rises with the occasion, and the sheepish "gaby" becomes the knowing practical man; his is now the voice of authority, and his comrades recant on the spot, acknowledge his superiority without a murmur, and perform "ko-tow" before the once despised man of undeveloped abilities. They pull out their clean towels with alacrity in response to his demand for pudding-cloths; they run to the canteen enthusiastically for a further supply on a hint from him that ...
— Camps, Quarters, and Casual Places • Archibald Forbes

... the time of Nephercheres, and Sesochris was supposed to have been a giant in stature. A few details about royal edifices were mixed up with these prodigies. Teti had laid the foundation of the great palace of Memphis, Ouenephes had built the pyramids of Ko-kome near Saqqara. Several of the ancient Pharaohs had published books on theology, or had written treatises on anatomy and medicine; several had made laws called Kakou, the male of males, or the bull of bulls. They explained ...
— The Great Events by Famous Historians, Vol. 1 • Various

... With a smile of delight she nodded, struck her own bosom with her fist, and said, "Nootka! Nootka!" Then, tapping her friend, she said—"Addi-lay?" The Indian, nodding assent, tapped her in return and exclaimed, "No-oot-ko?" ...
— The Walrus Hunters - A Romance of the Realms of Ice • R.M. Ballantyne

... since I left. I can hear her yet, shrieking and clattering her dishes, with the frogs yelling accompaniment in the creek that mumbled in the valley. I never could abide American frogs since. There is rest in the ko-ax, ko-ax! of its European brother, but the breathless yi! yi! of our American frogs makes me feel always as if I ...
— The Making of an American • Jacob A. Riis

... Ko. en Parizo preparas kun la helpo de Sinjoro de Menil tutmondan jarlibron Esperantistan. Tiu jarlibro enhavos la nomojn kaj adresojn de cxiuj Esperantistoj, pro-esperantaj Societoj, jxurnaloj, k.c. Gxi eliros en la monato ...
— The Esperantist, Vol. 1, No. 2 • Various

... achieve this happy chef-d'oeuvre of the tailoring art. But I once said to him, "My good Navarre, in the name of heaven tell me, from what Japanese manuscript did you fish out that odious hat? Why, with such a shed, you might very well be mistaken for Chin-ko-fi-ku-o, high-priest of the temple of Twi. Do give me the address of your hatter, my dear friend." Navarre, ...
— Le Morvan, [A District of France,] Its Wild Sports, Vineyards and Forests; with Legends, Antiquities, Rural and Local Sketches • Henri de Crignelle

... vare troonk sheounders dosh vot ever dey hadn't ort! Dat is vree koontry. Mein knabe ish roon off ver liebin a Yangee; unt a vool he ish, doo. Unt ich ish hoong unt troundt unt darrdt unt vedderd unt drakt out indoo de ribber, unt dolt if I ko back do mein vrau unt kinder I zhall pe kilt vunst more already. Unt I shpose if ich shtays here der Gainduckee beobles vill hang me unt dar me unt trown me all over in der ribber, doo, already, pekoz I ish Deutsch. ...
— The End Of The World - A Love Story • Edward Eggleston

... illustrious point of his existence—at the time, indeed, when after purchasing without money the renowned and proficient charm-water Ho-Ko for a million taels, he had sold it again for ten—that Chang was informed by his brother of the circumstances connected with Ling. After becoming specially assured that the matter was indeed such as it was represented to be, ...
— The Wallet of Kai Lung • Ernest Bramah

... is singular, and perhaps significant, that the word eriko, in Greek, [Greek: e)ri/ko], whence erica is probably derived, means to break in pieces, ...
— The Symbolism of Freemasonry • Albert G. Mackey

... When he spoke again, it was in English. "I will say no morr. If you haff questionss to ask, ko ahet. I will not take up time ...
— The Highest Treason • Randall Garrett

... but if it fills the river a little it will do us good, for we may then use it for the transport of our supplies, and it is now too low. We do not know much what is ahead of us, but we hear of Tartar troops farther on; and at Tung-chow it is said that a large army is collected under Sang-ko-lin-sin himself (their great general). I am now enjoying the life of a camp; writing to you seated on my portmanteau, with my desk on my only chair. It is perhaps better than my hothouse ...
— Letters and Journals of James, Eighth Earl of Elgin • James, Eighth Earl of Elgin

... throne To which the steps are mountains; where the God Is a pervading Life and Light,—so shown[kn] Not on those summits solely, nor alone In the still cave and forest; o'er the flower His eye is sparkling, and his breath hath blown, His soft and summer breath, whose tender power[ko] Passes the strength of storms ...
— The Works of Lord Byron, Volume 2 • George Gordon Byron

... I, Tawno," said I, "going to fill the kettle, as it is possible that Miss Berners may arrive this night." "Kos-ko," drawled out Tawno, and replaced the curtain. "Good, do you call it?" said the sharp voice of his wife; "there is no good in the matter; if that young chap were not living with the rawnee in the illegal and uncertificated line, he would not be getting up in the middle of the night to fill her kettles." ...
— The Romany Rye - A Sequel to 'Lavengro' • George Borrow

... connection is the following remark on the Negritos by Taw Sein Ko, in his "Origin of the Burmese Race," published in the magazine Buddhism, (Rangoon, Burma), in March, 1904: "There remains the question as to the autochthonous races which were displaced by the Burmese, Talaings, Shans, Chins, and Karens in Burma. Before the ...
— The Philippine Islands, 1493-1898, Volume XXXVI, 1649-1666 • Various

... remembered, glowering. "As I recall it, all that went on that list was the names of people who were slated to have their heads chopped off by Ko-Ko. Better watch your step, Shorty. It may be a back-handed omen. Maybe all those workers you're puttin' ticklers on to pump them full of adrenaline so they'll overwork without noticin' it will revolt and come out some ...
— The Creature from Cleveland Depths • Fritz Reuter Leiber

... ko-ax, ko-ax! Brekekekex, ko-ax, ko-ax! We children of the fountain and the lake Let us wake Our full choir-shout, as the flutes are ringing out, Our symphony of clear-voiced song. The song we used to love in the Marshland up above, In ...
— The Frogs • Aristophanes

... and felt, through his intoxication, that things were going wrong with Nikolai. He heard it dripping and dripping in the thaw outside—splash, splash! The sound came in a monotonous chant: Ni-ko-lai, Ni-ko-lai. ...
— One of Life's Slaves • Jonas Lauritz Idemil Lie

... of Confucius (478 B.C.) the teachings of the great master were neglected, but still later they were re-enforced and expounded in the time (372-289 B.C.) of Meng Ko, or Mencius (as the name has been Latinized) who was likewise a native of the State of Lu. At one time a Chinese Emperor attempted in vain to destroy not only the writings of Confucius but also the ancient ...
— The Religions of Japan - From the Dawn of History to the Era of Meiji • William Elliot Griffis

... images broken, and books burnt. But these persecutions seem never to have lasted long, and when they were over, monasteries, temples, and pagodas soon sprang up again, images were restored, and books collected in greater abundance than ever. Dr. Edkins tells us that "in an account of the Ko-t'sing monastery in the History of T'ian-t'ai-shan it is said that a single work was saved from a fire there several centuries ago, which was written on the Pei-to (Pe-ta) or palm leaf of India." He also states that great pagodas were built on purpose as safe ...
— Chips From A German Workshop, Vol. V. • F. Max Mueller

... 4KHO 3KCl 3H2O KO.C6H4.CHO, some para-oxybenaldehyde being formed at the same time. It is volatile (para-oxybenzaldehyde is not) and gives a violet coloration with ferric chloride. For dioxybenzaldehydes and their derivatives see ...
— Project Gutenberg Encyclopedia

... related by them*: The Daedalus appeared in sight of Hoo-doo's habitation in the afternoon, and was seen the next morning, but at a great distance from the main land. Although she was near two islands which are inhabited, and which Toogee in his chart calls Ko-mootu-Kowa, and Opan-a-ke, curiosity, and the hopes of getting some iron, induced Povoreek the chief, Too-gee, and Hoo-doo, with his brother, one of his wives, and the priest, to launch their canoes. They went first to the largest of the two islands, where they were joined by Tee-ah-wor-rack, ...
— An Account of the English Colony in New South Wales, Vol. 1 • David Collins

... xka[c]ampe chu chii Tullan. Xa chuvi cholo chic canayi xoh i[c]o vipe; haok x[t]ahar can ru xe palouh ru vi palouh. Cani [c]a xequicot conohel, ok x[c]i[c,]et canayi chupam palouh, cani [c]a xepixaban quij, [c]a chi la ko oyobem vi ki, chuvi nabey huyu, chiri komolo viki, xe cha, xavi[c]a xere ka ...
— The Annals of the Cakchiquels • Daniel G. Brinton

... mârkar khâve per ke heth, Kuchh sansâ man na dhare, woh hogâ râjâ jeth. Jo mainâ ko mâr khâ, man men rakhe dhîr; Kuchh chintâ man na ...
— Tales Of The Punjab • Flora Annie Steel

... climbed, he ran with alarm to the lodge. "Noko! Noko!"[6] he cried, "I have heard a monedo." She laughed at his fears, and asked him what kind of a noise it made. He answered, "It makes a noise like this: Ko-ko-ko-ho." She told him that he was young and foolish; that what he had heard was only a bird, deriving its name from ...
— The Myth of Hiawatha, and Other Oral Legends, Mythologic and Allegoric, of the North American Indians • Henry R. Schoolcraft

... Rock reservation, North Dakota. c. Blackfeet or Si-ha-sa-pa ("Black-feet"), mostly on Cheyenne reservation, South Dakota, with some on Standing Eock reservation, North Dakota. d. Minneconjou or Mi-ni-ko-o-ju ("Plant beside the stream"), mostly on Cheyenne reservation, South Dakota, partly on Rosebud reservation, South Dakota, with some on Standing Rock reservation, North Dakota. e. Two Kettles or O-o-he non-pa ("Two boilings"), on Cheyenne reservation, South Dakota. f. Ogalala or O-gla-la ...
— The Siouan Indians • W. J. McGee

... "According to Chinese annals, Tai-Ko-Fokee, the great stranger king, ruled the kingdom of China. In pictures he is represented with two small horns, like those associated with the representations of Moses. He and his successor are said to ...
— The Antediluvian World • Ignatius Donnelly

... mantelpieces or very ancient geological formations, it is quite conceivable that some toads-in-a-hole may really be far from mere vulgar impostors, and may have passed the traditional seven years of the Indian philosophers in solitary meditation on the syllable Om, or on the equally significant Ko-ax, Ko-ax of the irreverent Attic dramatist. "Certainly not a centenarian, but perhaps a good seven-year sleeper for all that," is the final verdict which the court is disposed to return, after due consideration of all the probabilities ...
— Falling in Love - With Other Essays on More Exact Branches of Science • Grant Allen

... clear, now faint and low, The airy tinklings come and go, Like chimings from the far-off tower, Or patterings of an April shower That makes the daisies grow; Ko-ling, ko-lang, kolinglelingle Far down the darkening dingle, The cows ...
— Poems Teachers Ask For • Various

... watch sounded. On every side the sounds of human life were silenced, and all things were still. Suddenly she heard, under the floor, this noise: Ko-Ko. She sat up, thinking it was a rat, and saw a part of the floor move to one side. A shaven head appeared, and was quickly followed by the whole body. It was a bonze. Mei-chieh was ...
— Eastern Shame Girl • Charles Georges Souli

... into the dark forest and came back soon, dragging a half-witted youth, named Ko'so, grinning and mumbling and content till the curved N'gombi knife, that his captor wielded, came "snack" to his neck and then ...
— Bones - Being Further Adventures in Mr. Commissioner Sanders' Country • Edgar Wallace

... said these things." It was a jemindar of the 129th who spoke. "Yes, a German sahib called to me in Hindustani, 'Ham dost hein—Hamari pas ao—Ham tum Ko Nahn Marenge.'" Which being translated is, "We are friends, come to us, ...
— Leaves from a Field Note-Book • J. H. Morgan



Words linked to "KO" :   kayo, knockout, blow, KO punch, KO'd



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