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Know   Listen
verb
Know  v. t.  (past knew; past part. known; pres. part. knowing)  
1.
To perceive or apprehend clearly and certainly; to understand; to have full information of; as, to know one's duty. "O, that a man might know The end of this day's business ere it come!" "There is a certainty in the proposition, and we know it." "Know how sublime a thing it is To suffer and be strong."
2.
To be convinced of the truth of; to be fully assured of; as, to know things from information.
3.
To be acquainted with; to be no stranger to; to be more or less familiar with the person, character, etc., of; to possess experience of; as, to know an author; to know the rules of an organization. "He hath made him to be sin for us, who knew no sin." "Not to know me argues yourselves unknown."
4.
To recognize; to distinguish; to discern the character of; as, to know a person's face or figure. "Ye shall know them by their fruits." "And their eyes were opened, and they knew him." "To know Faithful friend from flattering foe." "At nearer view he thought he knew the dead."
5.
To have sexual intercourse with. "And Adam knew Eve his wife." Note: Know is often followed by an objective and an infinitive (with or without to) or a participle, a dependent sentence, etc. "And I knew that thou hearest me always." "The monk he instantly knew to be the prior." "In other hands I have known money do good."
To know how, to understand the manner, way, or means; to have requisite information, intelligence, or sagacity. How is sometimes omitted. " If we fear to die, or know not to be patient."






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Know" Quotes from Famous Books



... of them know me. I have had frequent occasion to consult with them on matters of importance. They are a shrewd and ...
— Monte-Cristo's Daughter • Edmund Flagg

... man and steed we feel Made but one hydra with its scales of steel. Yet is there history here. Each coat of mail Is representant of some stirring tale. Each delta-shaped escutcheon shines to show A vision of the chief by it we know. Here are the blood-stained Dukes' and Marquis' line, Barbaric lords, who amid war's rapine Bore gilded saints upon their banners still Painted on fishes' skin with cunning skill. Here Geth, who to the Slaves cried "Onward go," And Mundiaque and Ottocar—Plato And Ladislaeus ...
— Poems • Victor Hugo

... attempted any thing against Boulogne. The harbour appeared to me impregnable. I must confess, however, that the French appeared to me equally mad, in expecting any thing from their flotilla. Three English frigates would sink the whole force at Boulogne in the open sea. The French seem to know this; yet, to amuse the populace, and to play upon the fears of the English Ministry, the farce is kept up, and daily reports are made by the Commandant of the state of the flotilla. There is a delightful walk on the beach, which is a flat strand of firm sand, as far as the tide reaches. ...
— Travels through the South of France and the Interior of Provinces of Provence and Languedoc in the Years 1807 and 1808 • Lt-Col. Pinkney

... who know what is just and right ought (and are bound, cf. above, III. ix. 4) to do also what is just ...
— The Memorabilia - Recollections of Socrates • Xenophon

... pumps long before, the atmospheric pump being one of the oldest of modern machines. The vacuum was known and utilized long before the cause of it was known. [Footnote: The discoverer was an Italian, Torricelli, about 1643. Gallileo, his tutor and friend, did not know why water would not rise in a tube more than thirty-three feet. No one knew of the weight of the atmosphere, so late as the early days of this republic. Many did not believe the theory long after that time. Torricelli, by his experiments, demonstrated the fact and invented the mercurial barometer, ...
— Steam Steel and Electricity • James W. Steele

... we are for the Union. The World will not forget that we say this. We know how to ...
— The Great Conspiracy, Complete • John Alexander Logan

... have more to put up with than you have. You know all; you may be sure, if I could help it, I shouldn't ...
— More Pages from a Journal • Mark Rutherford

... murmured the venerable Arab, "I know not. We are not in the debt of the slave. We are in the debt of the Sheikh. It would cancel all obligations if the Sheikh from the North preferred to offer ...
— Driftwood Spars - The Stories of a Man, a Boy, a Woman, and Certain Other People Who - Strangely Met Upon the Sea of Life • Percival Christopher Wren

... much attention to teaching horses how to run lately. Old Quicksilver's pretty fair. Of course he ain't the best horse in the world but he'll do for cows and general knocking around. Horses are a good deal like men, you know, Dorsey—there's always one ...
— The Ramblin' Kid • Earl Wayland Bowman

... the English reader imagines that because this thread of sentiment runs through the character of France there is a softness in the qualities of French soldiers, he does not know the truth. Those men whom I saw at the front and behind the fighting lines were as hard in moral and spiritual strength as in physical endurance. It was this very hardness which impressed me even in the beginning of the war, when I did not know the ...
— Winning a Cause - World War Stories • John Gilbert Thompson and Inez Bigwood

... joke. I saw the three elders of our church—Ballard, Remington and Van Slyke—talking about it, and they were very bitter. And you know they ...
— Terry - A Tale of the Hill People • Charles Goff Thomson

... choice between the imitation and the real. The rightful pill and the cork ball are placed together on the floor of the jar. Will the Spider be able to know the one that belongs to her? The fool is incapable of doing so. She makes a wild rush and seizes haphazard at one time her property, at another my sham product. Whatever is first touched becomes a good capture and is forthwith ...
— The Life of the Spider • J. Henri Fabre

... whatever of the land divisions. The neighborhood of the fort was diligently searched for tracks of a horse herd, but none were discovered. They did not know what to think of this delay. At length, on the 14th of May, the Indians gave notice to some soldiers on the beach that from the direction of the south men mounted on horses and armed as they, were coming. It was the first land division under Rivera, fifty days from Velicata, without the loss ...
— The March of Portola • Zoeth S. Eldredge

... punk-looking raiment. I know ye! Ye werst a bargain and two pairs for two bits. But even as Adolph Zolzac and an agent for flivver accessories are ye become in my eyes, ye generation of vipers, ye clumsy, ...
— Free Air • Sinclair Lewis

... peoples. I admit that at the first I was sceptic. Were it not that through long years I have trained myself to keep an open mind, I could not have believed until such time as that fact thunder on my ear. 'See! See! I prove, I prove.' Alas! Had I known at first what now I know, nay, had I even guess at him, one so precious life had been spared to many of us who did love her. But that is gone, and we must so work, that other poor souls perish not, whilst we can save. The ...
— Dracula • Bram Stoker

... overshadowing the altar of their vows in the hour of earthly marriage, if by some happy fate, marriage should be within their reach, or like the holy pinions of the goddess Nout, folded about a coffin, in the time of earthly death. But scant are the occasions, and few there are who know them. ...
— Beatrice • H. Rider Haggard

... our beloved teachers were to be our guides through all our future career. The imagery employed consisted principally of roses, lilies, birds, clouds, and brooks, with the celebrated comparison of wayward genius to meteor. Who does not know the small, slanted, Italian hand of these girls'-compositions, their stringing together of the good old traditional copy-book phrases; their occasional gushes of sentiment, their profound estimates ...
— The Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table • Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr. (The Physician and Poet not the Jurist)

... has departed in anything essential from the principles of their design. It remains, and it seems to us as though it must remain for ever, an ideal attained. Every stone in the building, it may interest the reader to know, my grandfather had himself cut out in the model; and the manner in which the courses were fitted, joggled, trenailed, wedged, and the bond broken, is intricate as a ...
— Records of a Family of Engineers • Robert Louis Stevenson

... to the Soveraigntie, the whole power of prescribing the Rules, whereby every man may know, what Goods he may enjoy and what Actions he may doe, without being molested by any of his fellow Subjects: And this is it men Call Propriety. For before constitution of Soveraign Power (as hath already been shewn) all men had right to all things; ...
— Leviathan • Thomas Hobbes

... God told us differently. He made black men first, and did not love us as he did the white men. He made you beautiful, and gave you clothing, and guns, and gunpowder, and horses, and wagons, and many other things about which we know nothing. But toward us he had no heart. He gave us nothing except the assegai, and cattle, and rain-making; and he did not give us hearts like yours. We never love each other. Other tribes place medicines ...
— Missionary Travels and Researches in South Africa - Journeys and Researches in South Africa • David Livingstone

... sure she will," cried Israel, joining in with the group, "old ballyhoo that she is, to be sure. But didn't we pepper her, lads? Give us a chew of tobacco, one of ye. How many have we wounded, do ye know? None killed that I've heard of. Wasn't that a fine hoax we played on 'em? Ha! ha! ...
— Israel Potter • Herman Melville

... be curious—as he had been curious at the Rancho Seco—to learn the significance of the smile and the wink. Haydon would want to discover just how much Harlan knew about the murder of Lane Morgan; and he would want to know what Harlan knew of the gold that Morgan had secreted. And so Harlan rode on, watching the country through which he passed, but feeling assured there would be no shot to greet him from one of the many ...
— 'Drag' Harlan • Charles Alden Seltzer

... your question, though, before I ask one in return. I have heard that I was like her, and that is not surprising; my mother was very like her—they were cousins. Now I must inquire how comes it that you know anything of the family of Lunnasting? Were you ever ...
— Ronald Morton, or the Fire Ships - A Story of the Last Naval War • W.H.G. Kingston

... and decisively authentic is Teufelsdrockh's appearance and emergence (we know not well whence) in the solitude of the North Cape, on that June Midnight. He has a "light-blue Spanish cloak" hanging round him, as his "most commodious, principal, indeed sole upper-garment;" and stands there, on the World-promontory, looking over the infinite Brine, like ...
— Sartor Resartus - The Life and Opinions of Herr Teufelsdrockh • Thomas Carlyle

... hand, describing a visit to Aunt Patty's cottage, and a score of messages enumerated which the old lady had desired transmitted to her "dear hinny," as she still called Annie. "Tell her I don't tell fortunes now, for I know she will like to hear that; because once I remember she said, 'I wouldn't tell fortunes, aunty, for I don't think it is respectable.' So tell her I earn a good living by spinning on my little wheel, and try to be happy thinking she is so. But, sometimes, when ...
— Eventide - A Series of Tales and Poems • Effie Afton

... initiation into prison usages is very graphic, and as many of my readers know him, it will be highly amusing to them, although any thing but amusing to the Major. He says: "In the office of the penitentiary, I was stripped of my clothing and closely searched. Everything in the way of papers, knife, ...
— History of Morgan's Cavalry • Basil W. Duke

... hope, and I don't intend that any one shall know where the one begins or the other leaves off, either! And if any foreigner should remark that America is unfinished or untidy I ...
— Penelope's Postscripts • Kate Douglas Wiggin

... consequence was that the books kept themselves, and confusion grew upon confusion until the partners were quite confounded. Garrison naively confesses this fault of the firm to his brother-in-law thus: "Brother Knapp, you know, resembles me very closely in his habits of procrastination. Indeed I think he is rather worse than I am in ...
— William Lloyd Garrison - The Abolitionist • Archibald H. Grimke

... you wish to know the truth about bundling, I think your correspondent V. could tell you all about it—it seems by his confession that he has practiced it on a large scale. I never heard of the thing till about three ...
— Bundling; Its Origin, Progress and Decline in America • Henry Reed Stiles

... them to care for anything of the kind? Do you know that a seaman is the most absolutely conservative of ...
— A Dream of the North Sea • James Runciman

... a boy. Boys can take care of themselves better than girls. Do you know what time we ...
— Sam's Chance - And How He Improved It • Horatio Alger

... circumstances that you communicated to our government the prospect you had to be able, and your intention, to purchase one half of the interest of the Canadian Fur Company, engaged in trade by the way of Michilimackinac with our own Indians. You wished to know whether the plan met with the approbation of government, and how far you could rely on its protection and encouragement. This overture was received with great satisfaction by the administration, and Mr. Jefferson, then President, wrote you to that effect. I was also directed, as Secretary ...
— Astoria - Or, Anecdotes Of An Enterprise Beyond The Rocky Mountains • Washington Irving

... luck?" One would think the sound of his native tongue would have been refreshing to him in this dreary wilderness; but, without deigning to raise his head, he merely answered in a gruff tone, "Don't know, sir—don't know!" I certainly did not suspect him of knowing much, but thought that question at least would not be beyond the limits of his intelligence. Finding him insensible to the approaches of humanity, I revenged myself for his rudeness by making a sketch of his person, ...
— The Land of Thor • J. Ross Browne

... Uses.—We do not know to what use the Filipinos put this plant, but in India the sweet flowers are dried and sold in the bazars under the name of Nag-Kasar or Nagesur, which is used as a mild stimulant, but ...
— The Medicinal Plants of the Philippines • T. H. Pardo de Tavera

... Charles's queen, "that on the Eve of Saint Bartholomew, she, having no knowledge of the matter, went to rest at her accustomed hour, and, sleeping till the morning, was told, as she arose, of the brave mystery then playing. 'Alas!' she cried; 'the king! my husband! does he know it?' 'Ay! Madam,' they answered; 'the king himself has ordained it.' 'God!' she cried; 'how is this? and what counsellors be they who have given him this advice? O God, be pitiful! for unless Thou art pitiful I fear this offence will never ...
— Gaston de Latour: an unfinished romance • Walter Horatio Pater

... 'I dare say you know best,' said Louis, lazily. 'I have heard so many different accounts of late, that I really am beginning to forget which is the right one, and rather incline to the belief that Delaford brought a rescue or two with his revolver, and carried ...
— Dynevor Terrace (Vol. II) • Charlotte M. Yonge

... paper weight on the table when he brings down his fist, "if times gets any harder, as like enough they will, Dave Wisner's got to let that property go on the market for what it'll bring inside his one year of grace after foreclosure. I know what that means; it'll mean I got a few thousand acres of land more to distribute among my heirs and assigns, my executors, friends, faithful servitors, villagers and others—however you got that ...
— The Man Next Door • Emerson Hough

... who displayed their hebdomadal finery at the parish church of Waverley was neither numerous nor select. By far the most passable was Miss Sissly, or, as she rather chose to be called, Miss Cecilia Stubbs, daughter of Squire Stubbs at the Grange. I know not whether it was by the 'merest accident in the world,' a phrase which, from female lips, does not always exclude MALICE PREPENSE, or whether it was from a conformity of taste, that Miss Cecilia more than once crossed ...
— Waverley • Sir Walter Scott

... know," he replied; "but the laws of Pennsylvania would not hang him,—they might imprison him. But it would be different, very different, should they get him into Maryland. The people in all the Slave States are so prejudiced against colored people, that they never give them justice. ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 17, No. 101, March, 1866 • Various

... another on my chairs, I lose the use to avoyde the trouble of removing them, when I would open a book. Thence out to the Excise office about business, and then homewards met Colvill, who tells me he hath L1000 ready for me upon a tally; which pleases me, and yet I know not now what to do with it, having already as much money as is fit for me to have in the house, but I will have it. I did also meet Alderman Backewell, who tells me of the hard usage he now finds from Mr. Fen, in not getting ...
— Diary of Samuel Pepys, Complete • Samuel Pepys

... envy the Emperor the job of tackling her," said Gorman. "He won't find it a bit pleasant. I daresay he doesn't know Madame Ypsilante. He wouldn't be so cocksure of himself if he did. She's the kind of woman who throws things about if she's the least irritated. If the Emperor suggests her selling those jewels there'll be a riot. But it's no business of ...
— The Island Mystery • George A. Birmingham

... work of a learned priest, confined the franchise to those who should know how to read and write; and in 1849 this provision was rejected by men who intended that the ignorant voter should help them to overturn the Republic. In our time no democracy could long subsist without educating the masses; ...
— The History of Freedom • John Emerich Edward Dalberg-Acton

... know that. Well, there's one good thing about the searchlights. We know which way to go. ...
— The Boy Scouts on the Trail • George Durston

... harshly, "have you studied history in school? Good. Then you know how it was in the past. Wars. How would you like to get ...
— Cost of Living • Robert Sheckley

... We know that with continuous currents the positive carbon possesses a much higher temperature than the negative, and that its wear is about twice greater than that of the latter. But such greater wear of the positive carbon is especially due to the fact that combustion is greater ...
— Scientific American Supplement, No. 344, August 5, 1882 • Various

... said the earl. He did not exactly know how to commence the thunder of indignation with which he intended to annihilate his son, for certainly Kilcullen had done the best in his power to complete the bargain. But still the storm could not be stayed, unreasonable as it might be for ...
— The Kellys and the O'Kellys • Anthony Trollope

... moral superiority may be admitted; but alone it never would and never should contribute to his election. In times like these a reformer must identify a particular group of remedial measures with his public personality. The public has a right to know in what definite ways a reformer's righteousness is to be made effective; and Mr. Jerome has never taken any vigorous and novel line in relation to the problems of state and national politics. ...
— The Promise Of American Life • Herbert David Croly

... to arouse all the worst elements of her fiery nature to know that the girl's charms were alluring the man whom she worshiped, and a very demon of jealousy and ...
— The Masked Bridal • Mrs. Georgie Sheldon

... powerful political argument against us. He had a conference therefore with the committee on this subject; and, as they accorded with his opinion, they united with him in writing a letter to me, to know if I would change my journey, and proceed ...
— The History of the Rise, Progress and Accomplishment of the Abolition of the African Slave Trade by the British Parliament (1808) • Thomas Clarkson

... undertaken a mighty task [the trio'll shirk it though], fit only for a great people—that of changing the dynasty of the country (Great works). The League does not exactly propose, nor adopt such a scheme, but we know what it means, the principles it would inculcate, and that eventually it will resolve itself into an ...
— The Eureka Stockade • Carboni Raffaello

... anger, which I have now excited (for have I not questioned the perfection of your darling?); the storm may pass over me. Nevertheless, I will, when I can (I do not know when that will be, as I have no access to a circulating library), diligently peruse all Miss Austen's works, as you recommend.... You must forgive me for not always being able to think as you do, and still ...
— Selected English Letters (XV - XIX Centuries) • Various

... Minotaur derive these particular graces? How has it risen to so high a level on the wings of pure instinct? How could we explain the rarity of so sublime an example, did we not know, to satiety, that "nature everywhere is but an enigmatic poem, as who should say a veiled and misty picture, shining with an infinite variety of deceptive lights in order to evoke our ...
— Fabre, Poet of Science • Dr. G.V. (C.V.) Legros

... to himself. "We know now why the ostriches didn't get on. Nice sort of disease that. Oh! I do wish I had caught the nigger at it. But never mind, Joe's getting on; and as soon as I can leave him, I'll hunt out some more nests, and we'll ...
— Diamond Dyke - The Lone Farm on the Veldt - Story of South African Adventure • George Manville Fenn

... armour may be benefited by the experiences of the old warrior who is laying his armour off. I have climbed the Hill of Life, and am past the summit, I suppose, and perhaps it may help those just venturing the first incline to know what I think I would do if I had it ...
— 21 • Frank Crane

... hearing him constantly using the term, M'Allister soon acquired the same habit. I am afraid they both credited me with rather more erudition than I really possessed; but although I should never attempt to talk at large on matters with which I was not fully acquainted, I have lived long enough to know that it is not always wise to go very far in disillusioning others of the favourable opinions they may have formed respecting one's own abilities. It is, perhaps, one of those matters in which "a still tongue makes a wise head"; and, if ...
— To Mars via The Moon - An Astronomical Story • Mark Wicks

... striving for half a century, are the animating purposes. So we find Fridjof Nansen, who for a time held the record of having attained the "Furthest North," writing on this subject to an enquiring editor: "When man ceases to wish to know and to conquer every foot of the earth, which was given him to live upon and to rule, then will the decadence of the race begin. Of itself, that mathematical point which marks the northern termination of the axis of our earth, ...
— American Merchant Ships and Sailors • Willis J. Abbot

... Miss Keene, who had felt a sense of relief, nevertheless questioned his face as he again stood beside her. But he had recovered his beaming cheerfulness. "It's nothing to alarm you," he said, answering her glance, "but it may mean delay if we can't get out of it. You don't mind that, I know." ...
— The Crusade of the Excelsior • Bret Harte

... "Oh, I don't know exactly. There's some nice woods back of the town; I think I'll look 'em through, and then go on to New Derby. I read in the paper about some kind of a firemen's parade there to-morrow, and if there's a lot of people, ...
— While Caroline Was Growing • Josephine Daskam Bacon

... the roar of the great guns had died away, and the men on the vessels of the flotilla up the river were all anxiety to know what had been the fate of their gallant comrades on the "Carondelet." All the time the battle raged, the decks of the ships at anchor were crowded with sailors looking eagerly down the river, and trying to make out by the blinding flashes of the cannon the dark form of a gunboat ...
— The Naval History of the United States - Volume 2 (of 2) • Willis J. Abbot

... "brave the landscape's look" with our own eyes. We are to be more on guard against his affinities, his unconscious attractions and repulsions, than against his ethical and intellectual conclusions, if one may make that distinction, which I know is hazardous business. We readily impose our own limitations upon others and see the world as ...
— The Last Harvest • John Burroughs

... is Mellowes," he said, as she obviously hesitated. "If you tell him my name he will see me. I know he is in, I saw him at the Comedy ...
— The Phantom Lover • Ruby M. Ayres

... have Hippolyta! Tho every Step were guarded by a Brother, Tho she were circled round about with Rivals, Ye should not all have Power to keep her from me. Not have Hippolyta!— 'Sdeath, Sir, because I do not know my Birth, And cannot boast a little empty Title, I must not have Hippolyta.— Now I will have her; and when you know I can, You shall petition me to marry her. And yet I will not do't. ...
— The Works of Aphra Behn, Vol. I (of 6) • Aphra Behn

... I know I have placed it on record earlier in this writing that, during all the days of a long official life, women have had no influence over me. But I have been quick to see that they often had a strong swaying power over the ...
— The Lost Continent • C. J. Cutcliffe Hyne

... to old folk, from the peasant to the Cardinal, through every class of society in Italy—are drawn, even when they are slashed out in only three lines, with such force, certainty, colour and life that we know them better than our friends. The variousness of the product would seem to exclude an equality of excellence in drawing and invention. But it does not. It reveals and confirms it. The poem is a ...
— The Poetry Of Robert Browning • Stopford A. Brooke

... I know he did! Hattie always said it would be a match—from the very first, when he came here to ...
— Oh, Money! Money! • Eleanor Hodgman Porter

... the difference between his faint abstractions and the Platonism of a powerful nature fitted alike for the withdrawal of ideal contemplation and for breasting the storms of life,—would any one know how wide a depth divides a noble friendship based on sympathy of pursuit and aspiration, on that mutual help which souls capable of self-sustainment are the readiest to give or to take, and a simulated passion, true neither to the spiritual nor ...
— Among My Books - First Series • James Russell Lowell

... if you mean that we had a visitor last evening. I took him for Leonard, do you know! Only I thought his eyes and hair did not ...
— The Trial - or, More Links of the Daisy Chain • Charlotte M. Yonge

... normal sexuality due to the fact that so many little boys have had their ears boxed for taking naughty liberties with women? If so, I am quite prepared to accept Schrenck-Notzing's explanation as a complete account of the matter. I know of one case, indeed, in which an element of what may fairly be called suggestion can be detected. It is that of a physician who had always been on very friendly terms with men, but had sexual relations exclusively with women, ...
— Studies in the Psychology of Sex, Volume 2 (of 6) • Havelock Ellis

... the stream running through the fields past Abinger Mill. The Crossways farmhouse—perhaps Mr. Meredith had the name in his mind when he imagined the most gracious of his heroines—is of all the Surrey farmhouses I know the most fascinating. It lies behind a high wall, which runs round a square little garden; you peep through a gateway covered with ivy, and find an old lichened, weatherworn house, with ornamented brickwork and latticed windows, a house which Evelyn's grandfather may have known, and would ...
— Highways and Byways in Surrey • Eric Parker

... that can be accounted for only by the pain he must feel every time he hears himself screech. His harsh, shrill call, louder and more disagreeable than the kingbird's, cannot but rasp his ears as it does ours. And yet it is chiefly by this piercing note, given with a rising inflection, that we know the bird is in our neighborhood; for he is somewhat of a recluse, and we must often follow the disagreeable noise to its source in the tree-tops before we can catch a glimpse of the screecher. Perched on a high lookout, he appears morose and sluggish, ...
— Bird Neighbors • Neltje Blanchan

... quiet, nevertheless he would be right profitable unto the salvation of many, offered unto him a fitting place, saying: "Behold a hill; behold a valley; build and inhabit where it seemeth pleasant unto thine eyes; yet know thou this: if thou wilt build in the valley, thou mayest bring many souls unto God; but if thou abidest in the hill, thou wilt gain not so many, by reason of the vanities and delights which will attract their eyes, and for very many other causes ...
— The Most Ancient Lives of Saint Patrick - Including the Life by Jocelin, Hitherto Unpublished in America, and His Extant Writings • Various

... little squeaky voice again. "I say, hello! You ought to know me well enough by this time to answer, since you've been reading about me for ...
— The Magic Soap Bubble • David Cory

... of originality is, therefore, simply one of vitality. Does the fruit really grow on the tree? does it indeed come by vital process?—little more than this does it concern us to know. Truths become cold and commonplace, not by any number of rekindlings in men's bosoms, but by out-of-door reflections without inward kindling. Saying is the royal son of Seeing; but there is many a pretender to the throne; and when these supposititious people usurp, ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 10, No. 57, July, 1862 - A Magazine Of Literature, Art, And Politics • Various

... restored—only the liberty to read and study the living Word for themselves. They are not rebels; they are not heretics. They love the church, and they are her true sons. Only they maintain that some errors have crept in of man's devising, for which no Scripture warrant can be found; and they know that corruption hath entered even into the sanctuary, and they would fain see it cleansed. Is that sin? Is that heresy? Then methinks our Lord must needs have been a heretic and sinner (if it be not blasphemy to say it), for He would not suffer His Father's ...
— For the Faith • Evelyn Everett-Green

... unenviable distinction. It seems to be generally supposed, by those who harbour the doctrine, that red-headed people are dissemblers, deceitful, and, in fact, not to be trusted like others whose hair is of a different colour; and I may add, that I myself know persons who, on that account alone, never admit into their service any whose hair is thus objectionable. In Wales, pen coch (red head) is a term of reproach universally applied to all who come under the category; and if such a wight should by any chance involve himself in a scrape, it ...
— Notes and Queries, Number 191, June 25, 1853 • Various

... dear fellow," said Moronval, as they strolled through the empty boulevards, arm-inarm, that night, little Madame Moronval pattering on in front of them,—"you know if I can succeed in the establishment of my Review, that I shall make ...
— Jack - 1877 • Alphonse Daudet

... secret," I said, fiercely, "you know I can! You burnt my finger in the candle to make me tell you where the squirrel was, and I would not do it; Now, miss, remember that, and ...
— Miriam Monfort - A Novel • Catherine A. Warfield

... four Spanish smugglers from the frontier. I with difficulty obtained a place amongst them, as a Portuguese or a Spaniard will seldom make way for a stranger, till called upon or pushed aside, but prefers gazing upon him with an expression which seems to say, I know what you want, but I ...
— The Bible in Spain • George Borrow

... instalment of these spotless results, but a wringing mass of wet and dirty linen. The sun, however, coming out opportunely to our assistance, we made the best of our misfortune by spreading out our small wardrobe to the greatest advantage in its rays. Our guide, who by the way appeared to know nothing whatever about the path, proceeded to unroll his turban, and divesting himself of his other garments, took to waving his entire drapery to and fro in the breeze, with a view to getting rid of the superfluous ...
— Diary of a Pedestrian in Cashmere and Thibet • by William Henry Knight

... could for my son, but I really don't see what can be done for him in that case. You say you are afraid Lord B. will dispose of the estates that are left, if he can; if he has it in his power, nobody can prevent him from selling them; if he has not, no one will buy them from him. You know Lord Byron. Do you think he will do anything for George, or be at any expense to give him a proper education; or, if he wish to do it, is his present fortune such a one that he could spare anything out of it? You know how ...
— The Works Of Lord Byron, Letters and Journals, Vol. 1 • Lord Byron, Edited by Rowland E. Prothero

... benefit could arise from attaining the exact knowledge of the manner in which the apostate Jews practised unlawful charms or auguries. After their conquest and dispersion they were remarked among the Romans for such superstitious practices; and the like, for What we know, may continue to linger among the benighted wanderers of their race at the present day. But all these things are extraneous to our enquiry, the purpose of which was to discover whether any real evidence could be derived from sacred history to ...
— Letters On Demonology And Witchcraft • Sir Walter Scott

... I don't know how Neil had managed it in the time, but the house was lit from top to bottom and the servants were standing in a line for us to pass through, all with happy faces. And Maureen stood at the head of them, as though she ...
— The Story of Bawn • Katharine Tynan

... thank you," replied Frantz, whose lips were still pale from the emotion he had undergone, "I can't stop. I saw a light and I just stepped in to tell you—to tell you some great news that will make you very happy, because I know that you ...
— Serge Panine • Georges Ohnet

... clean him as though I were busy, and gave her such a beautiful clean new pinny, but he never took no notice of her no more than he did of me, and she didn't want no compliment neither, she wouldn't have taken not a shilling from him, though he had offered it, but he didn't seem to know anything at all. I can't make out what the young men are a-coming to; I wish the horn may blow for me and the worms take me this very night, if it's not enough to make a woman stand before God and strike the one half on 'em silly to ...
— The Way of All Flesh • Samuel Butler

... dost thou dread this? O faultless one, I can forsake myself but thee I cannot forsake.' Damayanti then said, 'If thou dost not, O mighty king, intend to forsake me, why then dost thou point out to me the way to the country of the Vidarbhas? I know, O king, that thou wouldst not desert me. But, O lord of the earth, considering that thy mind is distracted, thou mayst desert me. O best of men, thou repeatedly pointest out to me the way and it is by this, O god-like one, that thou enhancest my grief. If it ...
— The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 1 • Kisari Mohan Ganguli

... while we have a few moments to ourselves, I want to know what you mean to do about that ...
— Light O' The Morning • L. T. Meade

... with a head of garlic. This gives it what may be called a more foreign flavour, but this should not be done unless you know your guests like garlic. Unfortunately, the proper use of garlic is very little understood ...
— Cassell's Vegetarian Cookery - A Manual Of Cheap And Wholesome Diet • A. G. Payne

... with an enormous sigh. 'An' I know that ev'ry bit av ut was my own foolishness. That night I tuk maybe the half av three pints—not enough to turn the hair of a man in his natural senses. But I was more than half drunk wid pure joy, an' that ...
— Soldier Stories • Rudyard Kipling

... cried the priest, without knowing what he said, whilst the others shouted in the wildest confusion, "Prove it, prove it!" He was to prove that he had the right to say such things about Sophia Tiralla. They were all simply burning with curiosity. What did he know of her, what, what? That anybody knew such things about her only added to her charm ...
— Absolution • Clara Viebig

... stifle me,' she said. 'Leave me alone. I don't know what is the matter with me. The ground seems to give way under my feet. It is there ...
— Abbe Mouret's Transgression - La Faute De L'abbe Mouret • Emile Zola

... nest. There wasn't because—why, do you think? There wasn't because Blacky looked straight down on a great mass of feathers which quite covered them from sight, and he didn't have to look twice to know that that great mass of feathers was really a great bird, the bird to ...
— Blacky the Crow • Thornton W. Burgess

... all difficulties, and I shall not delay one moment the endeavour to effect something useful to the interests of the State. I think it proper, however, to intimate to your excellencies that, everything being paid relative to the expense of the present expedition, I know of no means whereby a single vessel can be maintained during the ...
— The Life of Thomas, Lord Cochrane, Tenth Earl of Dundonald, Vol. II • Thomas Lord Cochrane

... proper excuse could a young white man have for visiting a colored woman? At the schoolhouse she would be surrounded by her pupils, and a private interview would be as difficult, with more eyes to remark and more tongues to comment upon it. He might address her by mail, but did not know how often she sent to the nearest post-office. A letter mailed in the town must pass through the hands of a postmaster notoriously inquisitive and evil-minded, who was familiar with Tryon's handwriting and had ample time to attend to other people's business. ...
— The House Behind the Cedars • Charles W. Chesnutt

... wife is better, and begins to be able to go out-of-doors again, I thought we would have a little fun at his expense. Some wolves and wild goats having been driven into a wood near La Pecorara, which, as you know, is about a mile from here, on the way to La Sforzesca, Cardinal Sanseverino had a common farm pig shut up in the same enclosure, and the next day we went out hunting, and took Mariolo with us. While we hunted the wolves and wild ...
— Beatrice d'Este, Duchess of Milan, 1475-1497 • Julia Mary Cartwright

... 'Oh, you know father's way. He just smiled as though the whole thing were beneath his notice, and went on reading his paper, and when mother appealed to him he said, coolly, that it was none of his business or hers either if Ursula chose to make a fool ...
— Uncle Max • Rosa Nouchette Carey

... villain!" fumed Mr. Meredith. "For a six-months I've sat quiet, as ye know, and 't is merely his way of paying the debts he owes me. A fine state ye've brought the land to, when a man can settle private ...
— Janice Meredith • Paul Leicester Ford

... with old Mr. Milton about the Bread Street days, how the good man must have yearned to speak sometimes when the old gentleman was out of the way, and he and Milton were alone. "O my dear Mr. Milton, how much we are all concerned about that pamphlet! I am not going to argue it with you; I know you too well, and how little influence my reasonings could have with you now in any such matter; and it is my comfort at least to be able to tell some of my Assembly friends that, if they knew you ...
— The Life of John Milton Vol. 3 1643-1649 • David Masson

... follow me home one evening from the Academy of Music, but I dodged him. I didn't want him to know where I boarded, for fear he would carry off my little sister, as he ...
— Rufus and Rose - The Fortunes of Rough and Ready • Horatio Alger, Jr

... have heard him assert, that a tavern chair was the throne of human felicity.—"As soon," said he, "as I enter the door of a tavern, I experience an oblivion of care, and a freedom from solicitude: when I am seated, I find the master courteous, and the servants obsequious to my call; anxious to know and ready to supply my wants: wine there exhilarates my spirits, and prompts me to free conversation and an interchange of discourse with those whom I most love: I dogmatise and am contradicted, and in this conflict of opinions and sentiments I find ...
— Life Of Johnson, Vol. 2 • Boswell, Edited by Birkbeck Hill

... nonchalant outsiders: 'Yes, I am his wife, his wife, the wife of the object over there, brought here to the hospital, shot in a saloon brawl.' And the surgeon's face, alive with a new preoccupation, seemed to reply: 'Yes, I know! You need not ...
— The Web of Life • Robert Herrick

... Polder declared; "it has a tensile strength. I know what it will do. This," he indicated the fragment of a grace razed over twenty-three hundred years before, "is good for nothing that I see." Now, Howat told himself, it was merely a question of tensile strength. His old enthusiasms, his passionate ...
— The Three Black Pennys - A Novel • Joseph Hergesheimer

... "But both Saussure and I ought to have known,—we did know, but did not think of it,—that the covering or cap-cloud forms on hot summits as well as cold ones;—that the red and bare rocks of Mont Pilate, hotter, certainly, after a day's sunshine than the cold storm-wind which sweeps to them from the Alps, nevertheless have been ...
— The Storm-Cloud of the Nineteenth Century - Two Lectures delivered at the London Institution February - 4th and 11th, 1884 • John Ruskin

... age and rank, and the object of the expedition, in which he lost his life. We found the escutcheon, painted by Webber, the draughtsman of the Resolution, and suspended by Captain King in the church at Paratunka, in the portico of Major Krupskoy's house, nor did any one appear to know what connection it had with this painted board; and as there has been no church for many years either in Paratunka or Saint Peter and Saint Paul, it was very fortunate that the escutcheon was not entirely lost. La Perouse, finding the board on the tree rotting very fast, had the inscription ...
— A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Volume 17 • Robert Kerr

... she had slept and dreamed she did not know, when something gently awakened her. She opened her eyes calmly—to meet a vision that brave as she was, nearly froze the ...
— Capitola the Madcap • Emma D. E. N. Southworth

... said, 'your tremblings concerning my son and my family are, I assure you, gratuitous. Such trembling as the case demands you had better leave to me. My heart tells me I have been very wrong to that poor child, and I would give much to know that she was found and that ...
— Aylwin • Theodore Watts-Dunton

... solid structure of stone we know to be the work of Prior de Estria, i.e., of Eastry in Kent, who was elected in 1285, and died in 1331. According to the Obituary record, he "fairly decorated the choir of the church with most ...
— The Cathedral Church of Canterbury [2nd ed.]. • Hartley Withers

... I have met since then," answered Darwood. "I reckon you know all about it. He came spying on our camp this morning ...
— The Pony Rider Boys in Alaska - The Gold Diggers of Taku Pass • Frank Gee Patchin

... may not destroy our friends and helpers, it is expedient to know what creatures help to hold pests ...
— Ontario Teachers' Manuals: Nature Study • Ontario Ministry of Education

... know," she said, regarding him, "that you are absolutely trustworthy. It's a nice quality now, but I don't think I would have noticed it even a month ago. You can see that I have grown frightfully old in the littlest while. Yes, you are comfortable to be with, and I suspect that counts ...
— The Happy End • Joseph Hergesheimer

... had been landed for the purpose of being left in the woods, but no sooner did the natives see them than they seized them by the ears, evidently with the intention of carrying them off and killing them. Captain Cook, wishing to know the use of the stick one of them carried, the native set up a mark and threw his stick at it. He missed it, however, so often, that Omai, to show the superiority of the white men's arms, fired his musket. This very naturally made the whole party ran off, and drop some axes and other things ...
— Captain Cook - His Life, Voyages, and Discoveries • W.H.G. Kingston

... answered, "I believe I know quite well how you wish a nobleman to be, but perhaps I do not know how he should comport himself in everything. Do you refer to any particular circumstance, or are you ...
— The Bride of Dreams • Frederik van Eeden

... development as a medium I know nothing, as I first knew him in his abnormal character, in which he was truly marvelous, being perfectly familiar with all languages, living and dead, and with all subjects—religion, ...
— Buchanan's Journal of Man, March 1887 - Volume 1, Number 2 • Various

... Chicago till I was twenty. I lived all my life on a farm in Iowa, till I went up to get a job in Chicago after my father died and I was all alone in the world. We lived in the very wildest part of the State—in the part they call the 'Big Woods.' Oh, I know all about frontier life. And there's hardly any kind of 'roughing it' that I haven't done. I ...
— The Long Day - The Story of a New York Working Girl As Told by Herself • Dorothy Richardson

... "I don't know, mamma; it looked so lovely and peaceful—that pure blue spread over my head, and the little white clouds flying across it. I loved to look at it; it ...
— The Wide, Wide World • Susan Warner

... guards reached the two towns next day, August 25, 1914, which, as we know, witnessed the British retirement toward Le Cateau. Unmolested, they rode across the three bridges into the quiet, empty streets. Suddenly, when all had crossed, the bridges were blown up behind them by contact mines, and the German ...
— The Story of the Great War, Volume II (of VIII) - History of the European War from Official Sources • Various

... same," said Sainte-Croix, still attributing what he heard to a supernatural being, "when one makes a compact of this kind, one prefers to know with ...
— CELEBRATED CRIMES, COMPLETE - THE MARQUISE DE BRINVILLIERS • ALEXANDRE DUMAS, PERE

... Horse, Field and Garrison Artillery. The headquarters were at Woolwich, and the Royal Artillery Mess was the Headquarters Mess, and is so still, though lately there have been further sub-divisions of the Regiment. Still, these have not as yet, so far as I know, resulted in any change as regards the Headquarters Mess. It remains to be seen what changes will or will not be made ...
— The Chronicles of a Gay Gordon • Jose Maria Gordon

... understood! She understood my Crucible of God! Oh, uncle, you don't know what it means to me to have somebody who understands me. Even you have ...
— The Melting-Pot • Israel Zangwill

... and research I think I have identified as the Phoberos macrophyllus" (W. and A. Prod. p. 30). Thunberg alludes to it (Travels, vol. iv.)—"Why the Singhalese have called it a cinnamon, I do not know, unless from some fancied similarity in its seeds to those ...
— Ceylon; an Account of the Island Physical, Historical, and • James Emerson Tennent

... slender is the distant horizon that nothing less near than Queen Mab and her chariot can equal its fineness. Here on the edges of the eyelids, or there on the edges of the world—we know no other place for things so exquisitely made, so thin, so small and tender. The touches of her passing, as close as dreams, or the utmost vanishing of the forest or the ocean in the white light between the earth and the air; nothing else is quite so intimate and fine. The extremities ...
— Essays • Alice Meynell

... and never venture to enter into conversation with them. But they are well aware to whom each carriage belongs, and consequently when it behoves them to make their horses curvet, and otherwise show off their horsemanship to advantage. Black eyes are upon them, and they know it. When the carriages have made two or three turns, they draw up at different stations in a semicircle a little off the road, and there the inmates sit and view the passers by. Occasional streams of smoke may be ...
— Life in Mexico • Frances Calderon de la Barca

... I don't know. Said I hoped she'd like it and welcome. I'd like to have given her stuff for a dress ...
— Wanderers • Knut Hamsun

... as the 'division of labour' is really established, there is a difficulty about both of these principles. A produces what he thinks B wants, but it may be a mistake, and B may not want it. A may be able and willing to produce what B wants, but he may not be able to find Bhe may not know of his existence. ...
— Lombard Street: A Description of the Money Market • Walter Bagehot

... Memoir, that the Earl "was still repyning at the government of Drury." After causing great apprehension to the governors, the Lord Deputy sent the whole party to Kilkenny, and found the "Earl hot, wilful, and stubborn; but not long after, as you know, he and his two brothers, Sir John and Sir James, fell into actual rebellion, in which the good knight, Sir William Drury, the Lord Justice, died, and he, as a malicious and unnatural rebel, still ...
— An Illustrated History of Ireland from AD 400 to 1800 • Mary Frances Cusack



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