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Hie   Listen
verb
Hie  v. i.  (past & past part. hied; pres. part. hieing or hying)  To hasten; to go in haste; also often with the reciprocal pronoun. (Rare, except in poetry) "My husband hies him home." "The youth, returning to his mistress, hies."






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Hie" Quotes from Famous Books



... They gorged upon the half-dressed steer; Caroused in seas of sable beer; While round, in brutal jest, were thrown The half-gnawed rib and marrow-bone; Or listened all, in grim delight, While scalds yelled out the joys of fight. Then forth, in frenzy, would they hie, While wildly-loose their red locks fly, And dancing round the blazing pile, They make such barbarous mirth the while, As best might to the mind recall The boist'rous joys of Odin's hall. And well our Christian sires of old Loved, when the year its course had rolled, And brought blithe ...
— Marmion: A Tale of Flodden Field • Walter Scott

... he came and went: but scarce more than a sennight had passed ere I learned that he had come to dwell in Paris all out; and but little more time was spent when one even, Dame Isabel de Lapyoun came into our chamber as we were about to hie us abed, and saith she, speaking to none ...
— In Convent Walls - The Story of the Despensers • Emily Sarah Holt

... said Blancandrin, "by this right hand, And my floating beard by the free wind fanned, Ye shall see the host of the Franks disband And hie them back into France their land; Each to his home as beseemeth well, And Karl unto Aix—to his own Chapelle. He will hold high feast on Saint Michael's day And the time of your tryst shall pass away. Tale ...
— The Harvard Classics, Volume 49, Epic and Saga - With Introductions And Notes • Various

... to them, stopping once more to listen to the rhythmic sound of splashing water. "Come on, girls. It can't be more than a few hundred feet away, even though we can't see it for the bushes. Lead on, Mollie Billette, I wouldst hie me hence." ...
— The Outdoor Girls at Wild Rose Lodge - or, The Hermit of Moonlight Falls • Laura Lee Hope

... remedy for gout, to think, while fasting, on some other person, and thrice nine times to utter the words, touching the earth at the same time and spitting:—"I think of thee, mend my feet. Let the earth receive the ill, let health with me dwell" (-terra pestem teneto, salus hie maneto-. Varro de ...
— The History of Rome (Volumes 1-5) • Theodor Mommsen

... obstinate, Rather thereat Should I shun thee than still treat Of thy salvation. 48 Earth upon earth is this thy store, Since but earth is all this gold. O God most high, Wherefore permittest thou such war That, as of yore, To Babel's kingdom from thy fold Thy creatures hie? 49 Was it not easier journeying At first, more free than that thou hast With all this train, Hampered and bowed with many a thing That now doth cling About thee, but which at the last Must here remain? 50 All is disgorged ...
— Four Plays of Gil Vicente • Gil Vicente

... for that, Mr. Gerardo. Long before a week, as measured by your chronology, has elapsed, I shall lie beneath the sod. I've been put off that way too often. (Bringing down his fist on the piano.) Hie Rhodus! Hie salta! It's five years ago now that I called on the manager of the Royal Theatre, Count Zedlitz: "What have you got for me, my dearest professor?" "An opera, your Excellency." "Indeed, you have written ...
— The German Classics, v. 20 - Masterpieces of German Literature • Various

... soul there came this sense: "Her heart has answered unto thine; She comes, to-night. Go, hie thee hence! Meet her: no ...
— Rose and Roof-Tree - Poems • George Parsons Lathrop

... that I may not be content to follow through ignorance and indolence and be led to the lowly paths of life. Make my Hie positive; and from my surroundings may I look out and struggle to mount to the highest ideals, that I may be qualified to select the best in ...
— Leaves of Life - For Daily Inspiration • Margaret Bird Steinmetz

... fie hie sly cry shy vie sty pry why lied fried sky tied vied tried pried ally rely defy deny reply spry skies flies cried ...
— The Beacon Second Reader • James H. Fassett

... Norse thar, thadhra, thadhan, there, thither, thence. hvar, hvert, hvadhan, where, whither, whence. h[^e]r, hedhra, hedhan, here, hither, hence. Middle High d[^a], dan, dannen, there, thither, thence. German w[^a], war, wannen, where, whither, whence. hie, her, hennen, here, hither, hence. Modern High da, dar, dannen, there, thither, thence. German wo, wohin, wannen, where, whither, whence. hier, her, ...
— A Handbook of the English Language • Robert Gordon Latham

... My loved Belinda Jane. For he was rich and I was poor, And poets all are stupid Who feign the god of Love is not Cupidity, but Cupid. Perchance 'tis well, for had I wed That maid of dark-brown curls, You had not been, or been, instead Of boy, a pair of girls. Now listen to me, Walter Smith; Hie to yon plumber bold, An thou would'st ease my dying pang, His 'prentice be enrolled. For Jones has houses many on The fashionable squares, And thou, perchance, may'st be called in To see to the ...
— Humour of the North • Lawrence J. Burpee

... the surprised Du Guay-Trouin. "It is a big man-of-warsman and a Britisher too. We must give up our prizes, I fear. Clap on all canvas and we'll hie us to shore." ...
— Famous Privateersmen and Adventurers of the Sea • Charles H. L. Johnston

... Now hie we on, to silent shades, To glist'ning streams, and sunlit glades, Where all that woodland life can give, Renders it bliss indeed, to live. Come, ye who love the shadowy wood, Whate'er your days, whate'er your mood. And join us, freakish knights ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction, Vol. 10, Issue 264, July 14, 1827 • Various

... Sir Raynald, "see you not that he has neither breath nor voice to speak? If you wish to do him a service, hie to our tents—down yonder, to the east, where you ...
— The Prince and the Page • Charlotte M. Yonge

... I issued thence with you a brief while ago. Wherefore, I pray you, either address yourselves to make merry, to laugh and sing with me (so far, I mean, as may consist with your dignity), or give me leave to hie me back to the stricken city, there to abide with my cares." To whom blithely Pampinea replied, as if she too had cast off all her cares:—"Well sayest thou, Dioneo, excellent well; gaily we mean to live; 'twas a refuge from sorrow that here we sought, nor had we other cause to come hither. But, ...
— The Decameron, Volume I • Giovanni Boccaccio

... surprised, Jane," said he, in a tone not without affection in it. "You did not expect, I suppose, ever to see me again. It was a mere chance brought me to America. I shall stay here a moment, and then hie me back again. I could not pass through the city without a 'How d'ye' to the little girl for whom I have ...
— Jane Talbot • Charles Brockden Brown

... must hie me back to St. Blane's, for our good Abbot Godfrey bade me be with him ere nightfall. Where is your brother Allan? Say, was he of those who went with my father and Alpin to the punting in ...
— The Thirsty Sword • Robert Leighton

... for me. Just as soon as you people hie forth, off comes this b'iled shirt, and I shall probably meander around the house in my new silk pajamas. I shall read a little from Homer—Jack, let me have the key to that locked case; I've an idea that there must be some robust old, ...
— The Man on the Box • Harold MacGrath

... deepest, as offer to protect Varney in a cause of this nature. But to do this with any chance of success, you must go formally to work; and, without staying here to tilt with the master of horse to a privy councillor, and expose yourself to the dagger of his cameradoes, you should hie you to Devonshire, get a petition drawn up for Sir Hugh Robsart, and make as many friends as you can to forward your interest ...
— Kenilworth • Sir Walter Scott

...Hie thee hither, That I may pour my spirits in thine ear; And chastise with the valour of my tongue All that impedes thee from the golden round, Which fate and metaphysical aid doth seem ...
— The Works of Samuel Johnson in Nine Volumes - Volume V: Miscellaneous Pieces • Samuel Johnson

... any be so hardy, That would go with thee and bear thee company. Hie thee that you were gone to God's magnificence, Thy reckoning to give before his presence. What, weenest thou thy life is given thee, And ...
— Everyman and Other Old Religious Plays, with an Introduction • Anonymous

... news is heard with grief by all Met at Poseidon's festival; All Greece is conscious of the smart, He leaves a void in every heart; And to the Prytanis [33] swift hie The people, and they urge him on The dead man's manes to pacify And with the ...
— The Works of Frederich Schiller in English • Frederich Schiller

... mountain river Springs for the far-off ocean; Where the fresh leaflets quiver With a delightful motion; Oh! thither hie, and see How Nature's ...
— The Knickerbocker, or New-York Monthly Magazine, April 1844 - Volume 23, Number 4 • Various

... his tender age, Nor yet for his hie kin; But soon as ever he born is, He shall mount the gallow's ...
— The Chaplet of Pearls • Charlotte M. Yonge

... meats destined for the support of the poor or the entertainment of the traveller. No kindly porter stands at the gate, to bid the stranger enter and partake of the munificent abbot's hospitality, but a churlish guard bids him hie away, and menaces him if he tarries with his halbert. Closed are the buttery-hatches and the pantries; and the daily dole of bread hath ceased. Closed, also, to the brethren is the refectory. The cellarer's office is ended. ...
— The Lancashire Witches - A Romance of Pendle Forest • William Harrison Ainsworth

... in-flooence is going to carry to the Wite House. If you've got eny spare change, put her up on Winnyfield Skot Hancock, and count Mr. Conklin in Secretarry of State, but don't yer never giv it away, cos I'm play in' a dubbel game. Give us a suck of your bottel, and I'll hie myself thitherward for my nitely game of pennie anty with Genral Grant, who alreddy is awaitin' me behind yonder ...
— The Bad Boy At Home - And His Experiences In Trying To Become An Editor - 1885 • Walter T. Gray

... beware! And if she hie To Bona Dea, where no males may be, Straight to the sacred altars follow I, Who only trust her if my eyes ...
— The Elegies of Tibullus • Tibullus

... gewin oder vorlust, ere oder unere, lob oder unlob oder diser keins, sunder was in der warheit das edelste und das aller beste ist, das solt auch das allerliebste sin, und umb nichts anders dan allein umb das, das es das edelst und das beste ist. Hie nach mocht ein mensche sin leben gerichten von ussen und von innen. Von ussen: wan under den creaturen ist eins besser dan das ander, dar nach dan das ewig gut in einem mer oder minner schinet und wurket dan in dem andern. In welchem nun das ewig gut aller meist schinet, luchtet, ...
— Memories • Max Muller

... name, a potent spell, That bids the Virtues hie 10 From mystic grove and living cell, Confess'd ...
— The Complete Poetical Works of Samuel Taylor Coleridge - Vol I and II • Samuel Taylor Coleridge

... to-day the cloud of thunder lours To-morrow it will hie on far behests; The flesh will grieve on other bones than ours Soon, and the soul will mourn ...
— Last Poems • A. E. Housman

... have kept silent about your misdeeds?' she asked. 'Hie hence when I bid you, or you shall not see the ...
— The Red Romance Book • Various

... Manuel. Hie to the castle, some of ye, and bring What aid you can. Saddle the barb, and speed For the leech to the city—quick! some ...
— Life of Lord Byron, Vol. IV - With His Letters and Journals • Thomas Moore

... his steed she lifts the knight, "Now hie thee home to thy heart's delight." Gaily they dance in ...
— The Serpent Knight - and other ballads - - - Translator: George Borrow • Thomas J. Wise

... who'll send Such a treasure is my friend. Who hath sent thee?-Flora knows, For with care she reared the rose. Lo! here's a name!-it is the key That will unlock the mystery; This will tell from whom and why Thou didst to my presence hie. Wait-the hand's disguised!-it will Remain to me a mystery still. But I'm a "Yankee," and can "guess" Who wove this flowery, fairy tress. Yea, more than this, I almost know Who tied this pretty silken bow, Whose hand ...
— Town and Country, or, Life at Home and Abroad • John S. Adams

... hie me thither, strong in heart and rejoicing. I weary, as though I had a thousand years to wait, to be there, where I shall find ...
— The Well of Saint Clare • Anatole France

... thought, After his pleasure to him brought, The queene herself accustomed aye In the same barge to play, It needed neither mast ne rother, I have not heard of such another, No master for the governance, Hie sayled by thought and pleasaunce, Without labor east and west, All was one, calme ...
— A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers • Henry David Thoreau

... misfortune with a striking sincerity. Some addresses to God are left us from the latter period of Firenzuola, when for years he lay ill of fever, in which, though he expressly declares himself a believing Christian, he shows that his religious consciousness is essentially theistic. Hie sufferings seem to him neither as the punishment of sin, nor as preparation for a higher world; they are an affair between him and God only, who has put the strong love of life between man and his despair. 'I curse, ...
— The Civilization of the Renaissance in Italy • Jacob Burckhardt

... shadows slant for afternoon, When the midday meal is over, When the winds have sung themselves into a swoon, And the bees drone in the clover, Then hie to me, hie, for a lullaby— Come, my baby, do; Creep into my lap, and with a nap We'll break ...
— The Kingdom of Love - and Other Poems • Ella Wheeler Wilcox

... flowers, A nodding in their bowers; Or bright on leafy towers, Where the fairy monarchs rest." "But chiefly I bring, On my fresh sweet mouth, Her father's kiss, As he sails out of the south. He hitherward blew it at break of day, I lay it, Babe, on thy tender lip; I'll steal another and hie away, And kiss it to ...
— Old Spookses' Pass • Isabella Valancy Crawford

... is our day, and day becomes our night; Love changes all, o'er nature rules supreme; Alters her seasons, mocks her wisest laws, And, like the prophet, checks the planet's course. But from this world of hate, the night has fled, And I must hie me hence. O Isidora! Though my seeming's doubtful, yet remember, 'Tis true as Heaven, ...
— Olla Podrida • Frederick Marryat

... "Hie thee up, good maid, and so do," replied Mrs Wade cheerily, taking up a candlestick to light Mr Pulleyne to the room prepared for him, where, as she knew from past experience, he was very likely to sit at study till far into ...
— The King's Daughters • Emily Sarah Holt

... Montjoy the herald? speed him hence: Let him greet England with our sharp defiance.— Up, princes! and, with spirit of honour edg'd More sharper than your swords, hie to the field: Bar Harry England, that sweeps through our land With pennons[3] painted in the blood of Harfleur: Go down upon him,—you have power enough,— And in a captive chariot into ...
— King Henry the Fifth - Arranged for Representation at the Princess's Theatre • William Shakespeare

... little ones, laughing, must hie them away To the blackberry wood and the nut-growing ground; But in the home-garden our dear little May Sits calmly at rest, on this beautiful day, Contented with what she ...
— Little Folks (October 1884) - A Magazine for the Young • Various

... flee? The dingle was occupied; men and horses were everywhere in the lane; and the hounds were closing in above the gorse. The far side of the covert offered the only chance of escape, and thither he must hie, else the hounds, now pouring down the slope, would cut off his retreat. Quickly he threaded his way through the gorse, by paths familiar only to himself and the rabbits, till he reached the bank by the willows; but, even while he ran, the full chorus of the hounds ...
— Creatures of the Night - A Book of Wild Life in Western Britain • Alfred W. Rees

... readily listening, Whiles your song to familiar Duty calls him, he hie apace, Lord of fair paramours, of youth's Fair affection ...
— The Poems and Fragments of Catullus • Catullus

... has written a note in which she says: 'I walke manie times into the pleasant fieldes of the Holy Scriptures, where I plucke up the goodlie greene herbes of sentences by pruning, eate them by reading, chawe them by musing, and laie them up at length in the hie seat of memorie by gathering them together, so that having tasted thy swetenes I may the less perceive the ...
— English Embroidered Bookbindings • Cyril James Humphries Davenport

... throat to sing throuw, Len' me yer wings to gang hie, And I'll sing ye a sang a laverock to cow, And for bliss to ...
— Heather and Snow • George MacDonald

... soundest merrily, When the bridal party To the church doth hie! Bell! thou soundest solemnly. When, on Sabbath morning, ...
— The Complete Poetical Works of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow • Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

... wi' his hand, He garr'd the red wine spring on hie— "Now Christ's curse on my head," he said, "But avenged ...
— Types of Children's Literature • Edited by Walter Barnes

... somewhat different style of diving into the ivy and exploring the syringa. A new generation of doves has grown up since the lilacs were in bloom, and nothing is easier than to distinguish the old and young of the two or three separate families till all leave the grass and the gravel together and hie to the stubble-fields beyond our ken. Of the one mocking bird who made night hideous by his masterly imitations of the screaking of a wheel-barrow (regreased at an early period in self-defence) and the wheezy bark of Beppo, the superannuated St. Bernard, there could ...
— Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science, October, 1877, Vol. XX. No. 118 • Various

... by some strange chance, to stumble upon that incomparable specimen of modern sculpture which stands on high at King's-Cross, lifted up, in order, we presume, to enable the good citizens duly to feast their eyes upon its manifold perfections, as they daily hie them to and fro between their western or suburban retreats and the purlieus of King Street or Cheapside. What estimate would the stranger form of the taste or skill of those who placed on its pedestal the statue we have first supposed him to have found? It avails not to disguise the truth. ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, No. 327 - Vol. 53, January, 1843 • Various

... ye glass-makers," said he one morning at breakfast. "I find after telephoning to the office that I am not needed to-day; therefore, the moment we have swallowed these estimable griddle cakes of Hannah's we will hie us forth to instruct Jean in the art of manufacturing vases, bottles, tumblers and ...
— The Story of Glass • Sara Ware Bassett

... Scheria, far from all other people. He surrounded the city with a wall, built houses and temples, and divided the lands among his people; but he was dead and gone to the house of Hades, and King Alcinous, whose counsels were inspired of heaven, was now reigning. To his house, then, did Minerva hie in furtherance of the ...
— The Odyssey • Homer

... down, light down from your horse o' pride, I trow ye talk too loud and hie, And I will make you a triple word, And syne, if ye dare, ye shall ...
— Verses 1889-1896 • Rudyard Kipling

... thy footsteps turn, to meet, An earthquake yawning at thy feet, While o'er thy head pale meteors glare, And boding tempests fill the air, In throbbing anguish doom'd to roam, Yet never find a peaceful home. Haste! to the shrine of Mercy hie, There lift the penitential eye, With breaking heart thy sins deplore, And wound Integrity no more! Repentance then thy soul shall save, And snatch ...
— Elegies and Other Small Poems • Matilda Betham

... declares Nine days are past since all the court above In Hector's cause have moved the ear of Jove; 'Twas voted, Hermes from his godlike foe By stealth should bear him, but we will'd not so: We will, thy son himself the corse restore, And to his conquest add this glory more. Then hie thee to him, and our mandate bear: Tell him he tempts the wrath of heaven too far; Nor let him more (our anger if he dread) Vent his mad vengeance on the sacred dead; But yield to ransom and the father's prayer; The mournful father, Iris shall prepare With gifts ...
— The Iliad of Homer • Homer

... light, I ride, I ride, Upon the gust-winds back, And, when I mark the eventide, Or gathering of the rack; Like spirit of a pleasant dream, I mount upon a sunset beam, And hie me in a flashing stride, The ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction - Volume XIII, No. 370, Saturday, May 16, 1829. • Various

... is nothing new under the sun. We hie ourselves to the summer schools, and return laden with new ideas—when lo! it dawns upon us that all we have done during the hot days has been to make a new application of what Froebel taught the world before we were born. So in this introduction, an old story has been retold, but I hope that it ...
— Hand-Loom Weaving - A Manual for School and Home • Mattie Phipps Todd

... isle ofeel-field Dight am I to hie me: Give, O God, thy singer With glaive to end the striving. Here shall I the head cleave Of Helga's love's devourer, At last my bright sword bringeth Sundering of ...
— The Story Of Gunnlaug The Worm-Tongue And Raven The Skald - 1875 • Anonymous

... influences. In the rude battle and business of life, we come home to find a nook and shelter of quiet comfort after the hard and severe, and, I may say, the sharp ire and the disputes of the House of Commons. I hie me home, knowing that I shall there find personal solicitude and anxiety. My head rests upon a bosom throbbing with emotion for me and our child; and I feel a more hearty man in the cause of my country, the next day, because of the perfect, soothing, gentle peace which a mind ...
— History of Woman Suffrage, Volume I • Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, and Matilda Joslyn Gage

... ask my young readers to mount my hippogriff and hie with me to the almost inaccessible heights of the Rocky Mountains. There, for years, a band of wild and untamable savages, known as the Pigeon Feet, had resisted the blankets and Bibles of civilization. For years the trails leading to their camp were marked by the bones of teamsters ...
— The Luck of Roaring Camp and Other Tales • Bret Harte

... Blount came timely and well-trained. At once she set him on Withers, as one would hie on a good dog at a thief; and it was not long before she had the pleasure of seeing the chase brought to ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Vol. II., November, 1858., No. XIII. • Various

... weep, oh weep, ye Scottish dames, Weep till ye blin' a mither's e'e; Nae reeking ha' in fifty miles, But naked corses, sad to see. Oh spring is blithesome to the year, Trees sprout, flowers spring, and birds sing hie; But oh! what spring can raise them up, That lie on ...
— The Modern Scottish Minstrel, Volume III - The Songs of Scotland of the Past Half Century • Various

... kissing him as hard as he could. Jim jumped up and began to move away when he saw us, but stopped to ask what was the matter when he saw Willie's face. As soon as he knew what it was, he took the string off Pincher's neck, and throwing a stone at the stick called, "Hie, Pincher! fetch ...
— Golden Moments - Bright Stories for Young Folks • Anonymous

... excellences of your invention with the excellences of his. Meanwhile a coolness should be made to arise between her and him: and as there would be no artistic reason for his presence here after the verdict is pronounced, he would perforce hie back to town. ...
— A Laodicean • Thomas Hardy

... strode and thus he spoke, to that Archbishop meek: "I take the land thy king bestows from Eure to Michael-peak, I take the maid, or foul or fair, a bargain with the toast, And for thy creed, a sea-king's gods are those that give the most. So hie thee back, and tell thy chief to make his proffer true, And he shall find a docile son, and ye ...
— Harold, Complete - The Last Of The Saxon Kings • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... four hundred mules load high; Fifty wagons his wrights will need supply, Till with that wealth he pays his soldiery. War hath he waged in Spain too long a time, To Aix, in France, homeward he will him hie. Follow him there before Saint Michael's tide, You shall receive and hold the Christian rite; Stand honour bound, and do him fealty. Send hostages, should he demand surety, Ten or a score, our loyal oath to bind; Send him our sons, the first-born of our wives;— ...
— The Song of Roland • Anonymous

... after thee, (du Bellay) 'gins Barras hie to raise His Heavenly muse, th' Almighty to adore. Live, happy spirits! th' honor of your name, And fill the world with ...
— Anne Bradstreet and Her Time • Helen Campbell

... is pronounced Hie; doire, is trees or woods; luchd, people; and leigh, healing; and also a physician, whence the old English word for a doctor, a leech, so that ...
— The Celtic Magazine, Vol. 1, No. 2, December 1875 • Various

... "Hie thee hence, and boast at home, That never shall inquirer come To break my iron sleep again, Till Lok has burst his tenfold chain; Never, till substantial Night Has reassum'd her ancient right: Till wrapt in flames, in ruin hurl'd, Sinks the fabric ...
— Myths of the Norsemen - From the Eddas and Sagas • H. A. Guerber

... Lord of learen, he was a lord of hie degree; he had noe more children but one sonne, he sett him to schoole to ...
— Early English Meals and Manners • Various

... the ambassador, Sugawara Kiyokimi, in 802, and the latter accompanied Fujiwara Kuzunomaro, two years later. Saicho was specially sent to China by his sovereign to study Buddhism, in order that, on his return, he might become lord-abbot of a monastery which his Majesty had caused to be built on Hie-no-yama—subsequently known as Hiei-zan—a hill on the northeast of the new palace in Kyoto. A Japanese superstition regarded the northeast as the "Demon's Gate," where a barrier must be erected against the ingress of evil influences. Saicho ...
— A History of the Japanese People - From the Earliest Times to the End of the Meiji Era • Frank Brinkley and Dairoku Kikuchi

... managed to get out of the tower, he ran off to the Witch and asked her advice. Would a philtre serve as a spell to win her? Or, failing that, must he make an express covenant? He never shrank at all from the dreadful idea of yielding himself to Satan. "We will take care for that, young man: but hie thee up again; you will find some ...
— La Sorciere: The Witch of the Middle Ages • Jules Michelet

... far-end of Aros, there comes a back-spang of current straucht into Sandag Bay. Weel, there's the thing that got the grip on the Christ-Anna. She but to have come in ram-stam an' stern forrit; for the bows of her are aften under, and the back-side of her is clear at hie-water o' neaps. But, man! the dunt that she cam doon wi' when she struck! Lord save us a'! but it's an unco life to be a sailor—a cauld, wanchancy life. Mony's the gliff I got mysel' in the great deep; and why the Lord should hae made yon unco water is mair than ever I ...
— The Merry Men - and Other Tales and Fables • Robert Louis Stevenson

... Charioteer, I seek thy protection. Do my behest. My mind misgiveth me. The king may come to grief. Yoking Nala's favourite horses endued with the fleetness of the mind, do thou take these twins (my son and daughter) on the car and hie thou to Kundina. Leaving the children there with my kindred as also the car and the horses, either stay thou there, or go to any other place as it listeth thee." Varshneya, the charioteer of Nala, then reported in detail these words of Damayanti unto the ...
— Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa Bk. 3 Pt. 1 • Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa

... is going to slip out to Johnstown to spend Sunday with her mother. How I wish I could slip out to Rochester to sit a few hours in my mother's delightful east chamber, but I must hie me back to New York ...
— The Life and Work of Susan B. Anthony (Volume 1 of 2) • Ida Husted Harper

... thou sordid man!" exclaimed the poet. "Dost thou desire nothing brighter than gold, that thou wouldst transmute all this ethereal lustre into such dross as thou wallowest in already? For myself, hiding the jewel under my cloak, I shall hie me back to my attic-chamber in one of the darksome alleys of London. There night and day will I gaze upon it. My soul shall drink its radiance; it shall be diffused throughout my intellectual powers and gleam brightly in every line of poesy that I indite. Thus long ...
— Twice Told Tales • Nathaniel Hawthorne

... add a final word to those who are about to hie abroad for a genial climate, for beautiful scenery, or to see something not to be seen elsewhere. Have they thought of the Channel Islands? If not, let them try a month there, and if they are not pleased, there is the French ...
— Jethou - or Crusoe Life in the Channel Isles • E. R. Suffling

... lord must wait for the traitor foe By the walls of merry Carlisle; Else he would hie to his lady's help, ...
— Traditions of Lancashire, Volume 2 (of 2) • John Roby

... nuptial torches bore, As brightly burning as the mid-day's sun: But after them doth Hymen hie as fast, Clothed in sable and a ...
— Notes and Queries, Number 34, June 22, 1850 • Various

... I said, as soothingly as I could, "that you'd better go Home, and tie a Wet Clout round your Head; or, better still, hie to a Chirurgeon and be let Blood. Have ...
— The Strange Adventures of Captain Dangerous, Vol. 3 of 3 • George Augustus Sala

... not thy peace, Sit not thou still O God of strength We cry and do not cease. 2 For lo thy furious foes now *swell And *storm outrageously, *Jehemajun. And they that hate thee proud and fill Exalt their heads full hie. 3 Against thy people they *contrive *Jagnarimu. *Their Plots and Counsels deep, *Sod. 10 *Them to ensnare they chiefly strive *Jithjagnatsu gnal. *Whom thou dost hide and keep. *Tsephuneca. 4 Come let us cut them off say they, Till they no Nation be That Israels name for ever may Be lost in memory. ...
— The Poetical Works of John Milton • John Milton

... heareth now That his lady bright of brow Dwelleth in his own countrie, Never man was glad as he. To her castle doth he hie With the lady speedily, Passeth to the chamber high, Findeth Nicolete thereby. Of her true love found again Never maid was half so fain. Straight she leaped upon her feet: When his love he saw at last, Arms about her did he cast, Kissed her often, kissed her sweet Kissed her lips and ...
— Aucassin and Nicolete • Andrew Lang

... be done easily, I were to describe how they, by transgressing their own principles, make it apparent what kind of a spirit is moving them, while they, by virtue of the foundation of such principles, are scoffers and Ishmaels of all well-ordered church-life. Hic Rhodus, hie saltant (Here is Rhodes, here they dance)." "Also here" (as in Europe), Falckner proceeds, "the Protestant Church is divided in three nations; for there is here an English Protestant Church, a Swedish Protestant Lutheran Church, and people of the German nation ...
— American Lutheranism - Volume 1: Early History of American Lutheranism and The Tennessee Synod • Friedrich Bente

... glaubte, dem schien es ganz klar: Institutsvorsteherin nebst drei Pflegebefohlenen. Die letzteren muten wohl von denen[6-6] sein, die zur geringen Freude der ersteren auch die groen Ferien dableiben, weil ihre Eltern selbst verreist sind. Anna, Lina und Elsa hieen die drei Mdchen, die immer lachten, wenn[6-7] sie der Blick ihrer Hterin nicht traf. Denn alles kam ihnen lcherlich vor. Jugendlust und Freude, Unschuld und Kindlichkeit schauten aus den[6-8] Augen, sie schienen so froh, dem[6-9] Schulszepter entronnen zu sein, und wren,[6-10] wenn ...
— Eingeschneit - Eine Studentengeschichte • Emil Frommel

... it chanced so, Bold Robin in forest did spy A jolly butcher, with a bonny fine mare, With his flesh to the market did hie. ...
— Heroes Every Child Should Know • Hamilton Wright Mabie

... you hear your charge.— Come, good Sir Thomas More, to court let's hie; You are th' appeaser of ...
— Sir Thomas More • William Shakespeare [Apocrypha]

... not gone far before they had to cross a swamp, and midway through it the nag stuck fast. There sat the lad, beating it and shouting, "Hie! Hie! Now will you go? Hie! Hie! Now will you go?" Every one went riding by, and as they passed him they ...
— Tales of Folk and Fairies • Katharine Pyle

... me for smeche ne for miste. Ar[gh]e we be to don god to juel al to riste More eie stonde man of man an him do of criste. 20 e wel ne de e hwile he mai wel ofte hit sal him rewen. an alle men sulle ripen at hie ar sewen. Do al to gode at he mu[gh]e ech e hwile he be aliue. Ne lipne noman to muchel to childe ne to wiue. | e e him selfe for[gh]iet for wiue oer for childe [f. 1v He sal cumen on euel stede bute ...
— Selections from early Middle English, 1130-1250 - Part I: Texts • Various

... admitted, and approved of; yea, in such sort that if nature had not been so favourable unto them as to have sprinkled their forehead with a little tincture of bashfulness and modesty, you should see them in a so frantic mood run mad after lechery, and hie apace up and down with haste and lust, in quest of and to fix some chamber-standard in their Paphian ground, that never did the Proetides, Mimallonides, nor Lyaean Thyades deport themselves in the time of their bacchanalian festivals more shamelessly, or with a so affronted ...
— Gargantua and Pantagruel, Complete. • Francois Rabelais

... flooding fate. Beneath the Volscian hills, and near Where exiled Marius lurk'd in fear, 'Mid stagnant Liris' marshes, there Breathe first in that luxurious lair Where famous Hannibal lay;[18] Nor tarry; while the chance is thine. Hie o'er the Samnian Apennine To ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 62, No. 382, October 1847 • Various

... hie The travelling mountains of the sky. Or let the streams in civil mode Direct your choice upon ...
— Underwoods • Robert Louis Stevenson

... William openyd hys backe wyndow, That was in hys chamber on hie, And with sheetes let hys wyfe downe And ...
— Ballads of Robin Hood and other Outlaws - Popular Ballads of the Olden Times - Fourth Series • Frank Sidgwick

... bonny dell, whaur the sun luiks in Sayin, "Here awa, there awa, hand awa, Sin!" Sayin darkness and sorrow a' work for the licht, And the will o' God was the hert o' the nicht; Whaur the laverock hings hie, on his ain sang borne, Wi' bird-shout and tirralee hailin the morn; Whaur my hert ran ower wi' the lusome bliss That, come winter, come weather, nocht gaed amiss! Oh, the bonny, bonny dell, whaur the sun luikit in Sayin, "Here awa, there awa, hand ...
— Poetical Works of George MacDonald, Vol. 2 • George MacDonald

... kingly sort, Denies a boon to none: but, AEschines, One should not ask too often. This premised, If thou wilt clasp the military cloak O'er thy right shoulder, and with legs astride Await the onward rush of shielded men: Hie thee to Egypt. Age overtakes us all; Our temples first; then on o'er cheek and chin, Slowly and surely, creep the frosts of Time. Up and do somewhat, ere ...
— Theocritus • Theocritus

... faithful night! Now all things lie Hid by her mantle dark and dim, In pious hope I hither hie, And humbly ...
— The Paris Sketch Book Of Mr. M. A. Titmarsh • William Makepeace Thackeray

... Forestwards hie? Vain were all strife! Bright crown of life. Turbulent bliss,— Love, thou ...
— The Poems of Goethe • Goethe

... [in] the spring, In that it yields great store of rare delights; And, passing farther than our wonted walks, Scarce ent'red were within these luckless woods. But right before us down a steep-fall hill, A monstrous ugly bear did hie him fast To meet us both—I faint to tell the rest, Good shepherd—but suppose the ghastly looks, The hideous fears, the thousand hundred woes, Which at this instant ...
— A Select Collection of Old English Plays, Vol. VII (4th edition) • Various

... temples were the people to be really accused; the Cyclopians, Lamiae, and Lestrygons, who officiated at their altars. He speaks of the custom, as well known: and it had undoubtedly been practised in those parts, where in aftertimes hie was born. For he was a native [642]of Zancle, and lived in the very country, of which we have been speaking, in the land of the Lestrygons, and Cyclopians. The promontory of Scylla was within his sight. He was therefore well qualified ...
— A New System; or, an Analysis of Antient Mythology. Volume II. (of VI.) • Jacob Bryant

... Jupiter, one day, As on a cloud he lay, 'Observing all our crimes, Come, let us change the times, By leasing out anew A world whose wicked crew Have wearied out our grace, And cursed us to our face. Hie hellward, Mercury; A Fury bring to me, The direst of the three. Race nursed too tenderly, This day your doom shall be!' E'en while he spoke their fate, ...
— The Fables of La Fontaine - A New Edition, With Notes • Jean de La Fontaine

... agreed. "And now I must hie me to the job. Imagine, Cutty!—writing personalities about stage folks and gabfesting with Burlingame and all the while my brain boiling with this affair! The city room will kill me, Cutty, if it ever finds out that I held back such a yarn. But it wouldn't be fair to Johnny Two-Hawks. ...
— The Drums Of Jeopardy • Harold MacGrath

... under Rob's direction, to set to work at once. So Rob bade his brothers and cousin get their rude fishing rods, and hie away down to the rocks at the mouth of the harbor, and see what fish they could get ...
— The New McGuffey Fourth Reader • William H. McGuffey

... being landed, some of the crew propose, like merry Englishmen as they are, to hie to a neighboring ale-house, and have a cosy pot or two together. Agreed. They start, and Israel with them. As they enter the ale-house door, our prisoner is suddenly reminded of still more imperative calls. ...
— Israel Potter • Herman Melville

... I'll reign in triumph till autumn-time Shall conquer my green and verdant pride; Then I'll hie me to another clime Till I'm called again as a ...
— Happy Days for Boys and Girls • Various

... fuerchterlichsten Kriegen durcheinander geschuettelt, sodann wieder auf sich selbst einzeln zurueckgefuehrt, hatten zu bemerken, dass sie manches Fremde gewahr worden, in sich aufgenommen, bisher unbekannte geistige Beduerfnisse hie und da empfunden. Daraus entstand das Gefuehl nachbarlicher Verhaeltnisse, und anstatt dass man sich bisher zugeschlossen hatte, kam der Geist nach und nach zu dem Verlangen, auch in den mehr oder weniger freyen geistigen Handelsverkehr mit ...
— The Life of Friedrich Schiller - Comprehending an Examination of His Works • Thomas Carlyle

... Fairie takes, nor Witch hath powre to charme, So gratious, and so hallowed is that time. Hor. So haue I heard, and doe in parte beleeue it: But see the Sunne in russet mantle clad, Walkes ore the deaw of yon hie mountaine top, Breake we our watch vp, and by my aduise, Let vs impart what wee haue seene to night Vnto yong Hamlet: for vpon my life This Spirite dumbe to vs will speake to him: Do you consent, wee shall acquaint him with it, As needefull in our loue, fitting our duetie? Marc. ...
— The Tragicall Historie of Hamlet, Prince of Denmarke - The First ('Bad') Quarto • William Shakespeare

... was revel, gamen, and play; Lovely ladies, fair and free, That sat and sang on rich array. Thomas dwelled in that solace 205 More than I you say, parde; Till on a day, so have I grace, My lovely lady said to me[53]; "Do busk thee, Thomas; thee buse[54] again; For thou may here no longer be; 210 Hie thee fast with might and main; I shall thee bring till Eildon tree." Thomas said then with heavy cheer[55], "Lovely lady, now let me be; For certes, lady, I have been here 215 Nought but the space of dayes three!" "For sooth, Thomas, as ...
— The Sources and Analogues of 'A Midsummer-night's Dream' • Compiled by Frank Sidgwick

... "Hie unto Mistress Ursula Drew, that is over the kitchen, and do her to wit that her Grace's pleasure is to advance Maude, the scullion, unto room [situation] of tire-woman; bid her to give thee all that 'longeth unto the ...
— The White Rose of Langley - A Story of the Olden Time • Emily Sarah Holt

... to darken to night, They would hie along in the fading light, With elf-locked hair and scarlet lips, And small stone knives to slit the skeps, So softly not a bee inside Should hear the woven straw divide: And then with sly and greedy thumbs Would rifle ...
— Peacock Pie, A Book of Rhymes • Walter de la Mare

... cuts and points with fierce guttural exclamations, which are peculiarly disagreeable to European ears; especially when the listener is located in the vicinity of a guard-house, whose occupants notify their employment at daybreak with such cries as 'Hie-e! Ah-h! Atturah-h!' ('That's at! that's into you!') and continue this information, accompanied by the clashing of their sticks, and occasional chuckles, until late in ...
— Sketches of Japanese Manners and Customs • J. M. W. Silver

... suggested that he would fain hie to the Husks at a Reasonable Hour, they told him that Slumber was made for Slaves and to take his Feet out of ...
— Ade's Fables • George Ade

... letter! when my friend shall see thee, * Kiss thou the ground and buss his sandal-shoon: Look thou hie softly and thou hasten not, * My life and rest are in those ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 4 • Richard F. Burton

... though ye had twenty lives to spend. He has dwelt there long of yore, and on field much sorrow has wrought. Against his sore dints ye may not defend you' (ll. 2069-2117). Therefore, good Sir Gawayne, let the man alone, and for God's sake go by some other path, and then I shall hie me home again. I swear ...
— Sir Gawayne and the Green Knight - An Alliterative Romance-Poem (c. 1360 A.D.) • Anonymous

... Consume me Fire with thy deuouring flames, Or Water drowne, who else would melt in teares. But liue, liue happy still, in safety liue, Who safety onely to my life can giue. Exit. Cor. O he is gon, go hie thee after him, My vow forbids, yet still my care is with thee, My cryes shall wake the siluer Moone by night, And with my teares I will salute the Morne. No day shall passe with out my dayly plaints, 460 No houre ...
— The Tragedy Of Caesar's Revenge • Anonymous

... moonlight; When spring-tides are low: When sweet airs come seaward From heaths starr'd with broom; And high rocks throw mildly On the blanch'd sands a gloom: Up the still, glistening beaches, Up the creeks we will hie; Over banks of bright seaweed The ebb-tide leaves dry. We will gaze, from the sand-hills, At the white, sleeping town; At the church on the hill-side— And then come back down. Singing, "There dwells ...
— The Hundred Best English Poems • Various

... dead man row'd the boat, the living steer'd, Each in his pallor sinister, until The Isle of Pilgrimage they duly near'd— "Now hie thee forth, and work thy master's will!" So spoke the dead, and vanish'd o'er the lake, The Squire pursued his course, and gain'd the shrine, There, nine days' vigil duly he did make, Living on bitter ...
— Purgatory • Mary Anne Madden Sadlier

... one's a funny fellow; every one's a little mellow; Follow, follow, follow, follow, o'er the hill and in the hollow! Merrily, merrily, there they hie; now they rise and now they fly; They cross and turn, and in and out, and down in the middle, and wheel about,— With a "Phew, shew, Wadolincon! listen to me Bobolincon!— Happy's the wooing that's speedily doing, that's ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 2, Issue 12, October, 1858 • Various

... members of the executive committee; five others followed a few days after with the first waggon-caravan from Mombasa; so that, including Ney, Johnston, and Demestre (the last of whom had been co-opted at the suggestion of the two former), twelve were now in Freeland. As hie committee at that time consisted of fifteen members, there still remained three at a distance, of whom one was in London, another at Trieste, and the third at Mombasa, at which places they were for ...
— Freeland - A Social Anticipation • Theodor Hertzka

... moved with Dorcas's story, answered and said, 'Hasten, O damsel, who in a happy moment art come to put it in my power to serve the innocent and virtuous, which it has always been my delight to do: hasten to this young lady, and bid her hie hither to me with all speed; and tell her, that my chariot shall be her asylum: and if I find all that thou sayest true, my house shall be her sanctuary, and I will protect her from ...
— Clarissa, Volume 6 (of 9) - The History Of A Young Lady • Samuel Richardson

... Rachel?—Ah, ye laugh, young man! In troth she was the fair Mrs. Rachel in the year of grace seventeen hundred and sixteen; but time passes—ET SINGULA PRAEDANTUR ANNI—that is most certain. But once again, ye are most heartily welcome to my poor house of Tully-Veolan!—Hie to the house, Rose, and see that Alexander Saunderson leaks out the old Chateau Margaux, which I sent from Bourdeaux to Dundee ...
— Waverley • Sir Walter Scott

... take my way With blithesome heart, and there I'll stay, Respect and honour, whilst I breathe, To find his honour'd roof beneath. My chief of long lin'd ancestry Can harbour sons of poesy; I've heard, for so the muse has told, He's kind and gentle to the old; Yes, to his castle I will hie; There's none to match it 'neath the sky: It is a baron's stately court, Where bards for sumptuous fare resort; There dwells the lord of Powis land, Who granteth every just demand. Its likeness now I'll limn you out: 'Tis water girdled wide about; It shows ...
— Wild Wales - Its People, Language and Scenery • George Borrow

... height?" But he replied to the King, "O my lord, how shall we build a bower in the lift on other wise? And were the King my master here he would have edified two such edifices in a single day." Hearing this quoth Pharaoh to him, "Hie thee, O Haykar, to thy quarters, and for the present take thy rest, seeing that we have been admonished anent the building of the bower; but come thou to me on the morrow." Accordingly, Haykar fared to his lodging, and betimes ...
— Supplemental Nights, Volume 6 • Richard F. Burton

... practical scale, such as we are now, one and all, about to realize, theories and fancies sink wonderfully in the scale. For some weeks past, everything with the power of motion or locomotion has been exerting itself to quit the place and the region, and hie to more kindly latitudes for the winter. Nature has also become imperceptibly sour tempered, and shows her teeth in ice and snows. Man-kind and bird-kind have concurred in the effort to go. We have witnessed the long-drawn ...
— Personal Memoirs Of A Residence Of Thirty Years With The Indian Tribes On The American Frontiers • Henry Rowe Schoolcraft

... Police, that in the teeth of the law, and under its very eyes, a shameless gaming-house exists in moral Yorkshire, throughout every Doncaster St Leger race-week? Of course you haven't; never dreamed of such a thing—never could, never would. Hie you, then, and prosecute this wretched gang of betting-touts, congregating at the corner of Bride Lane, Fleet Street; quick, lodge informations against this publican who has suffered card-playing to take place, raffles, or St Leger sweeps to be held in his house. ...
— The Gaming Table: Its Votaries and Victims - Volume I (of II) • Andrew Steinmetz

... then by the sweetness of his language and delivery, And readily inferring what this prelude betokened, We hasted to open the door, and received him with welcome, Saying to the servant, "Hie! Hie! Bring whatever is ready!" But the stranger said, "By Him who brought me to your abode, I will not taste of your hospitality, unless you pledge to me That you will not permit me to be an incumbrance to you, Nor impose on yourselves necessity ...
— Library Of The World's Best Literature, Ancient And Modern, Vol. 2 • Charles Dudley Warner

... Hie thee to the breezy common, where the melancholy goose Stalks, and the astonished donkey finds that he is really loose; There amid green fern and furze-bush shalt thou soon MY WHOLE behold, Rising 'bull-eyed and majestic'—as ...
— Verses and Translations • C. S. C.

... wedlock's noblest crown! Know that Zeus' heart thro' thee is all aflame, Pierced with desire as with a dart, and longs To join in utmost rite of love with thee. Therefore, O maiden, shun not with disdain Th' embrace of Zeits, but hie thee forth straightway To the lush growth of Lerna's meadow-land, Where are the flocks and steadings of thy home, And let Zeus' eye be eased of its desire. Night after night, haunted by dreams like these, Heartsick, I ventured at the last to tell Unto my sire ...
— Suppliant Maidens and Other Plays • AEschylus

... given the Province suffered, still Eight stiff-backed loons I could not buy.' 20 (Withal none here nor there owned I Who broken leg of Couch outworn On nape of neck had ever borne!) Then she, as pathic piece became, "Prithee Catullus mine, those same 25 Lend me, Serapis-wards I'd hie." * * * * "Easy, on no-wise, no," quoth I, "Whate'er was mine, I lately said Is some mistake, my camarade One Cinna—Gaius—bought the lot, 30 But his or mine, it matters what? I use it freely as though bought, Yet thou, pert troubler, most absurd, ...
— The Carmina of Caius Valerius Catullus • Caius Valerius Catullus

... his pleasures, and his company?— Yet, ere thou go, see how I do divorce [Embraces young Spenser. Spenser from thee. Now get thee to thy lords, And tell them I will come to chastise them For murdering Gaveston: hie thee, get thee gone! Edward, with fire and sword, follows at thy heels. [Exit Herald. My lord[s], perceive you how these rebels swell?— Soldiers, good hearts! defend your sovereign's right, For, now, even now, we march to make ...
— Edward II. - Marlowe's Plays • Christopher Marlowe

... little of a migratory movement even up and down the mountains among these interesting birdlets. In the winter a few descend from the heights and dwell on the plains, where the weather is not so rigorous. On the approach of spring they again hie up into the mountains, spending the summer there and rearing their pretty bairns. However, the majority of them remain in the mountains all winter, braving the bitterest and fiercest storms, often at an altitude of 8,000 feet. Their breeding range is from 6,000 to 10,000 feet, the ...
— Our Bird Comrades • Leander S. (Leander Sylvester) Keyser

... Then hie thee to some bonny brake Another mate to woo and take, And as thy soul to love. Rise with the dew, stay not the noon, What's good cannot be found too soon, The wind will not be always south, Nor like a rose is every mouth, Time's quick to press, Do thou no less, And may the ...
— Path Flower and Other Verses • Olive T. Dargan

... "'Hie thee hence, Rodrigo Diaz, An thou love thy liberty; Lest, with this thy king, we take thee Into dire captivity.'" ...
— Legends of the Middle Ages - Narrated with Special Reference to Literature and Art • H.A. Guerber

... of added pity to the worn men in gray, who were being blindly dashed against this embodiment of modern power. And now this "silence that is golden" indeed is over all, and my limbs are unhurt, and I suppose if I were Catholic, in my fervent gratitude, I would hie me with a rich offering to the shrine of "our ...
— Strange True Stories of Louisiana • George Washington Cable

... night, wi' all its stars Sae clear, and pure, and hie! Like the eyes of angels up in heaven That will ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 62, Number 385. November, 1847. • Various

... a comparatively low altitude many birds, as is well known, hie to the far North to find the proper climatic conditions in which to rear their broods and spend their summer vacation, some of them going to the subarctic provinces and others beyond. How different among the sublime heights ...
— Birds of the Rockies • Leander Sylvester Keyser

... Hie est Guilfridus, belli dum vixit avidus. Cum gladeo et lancea Normannia et quoque Francia Verbera dura dabat. Per Turcos multum equitabat. Guilbertum occidit;—atque Hyerosolyma vidit. Heu! nunc sub fossa sunt tanti militis ossa. Uxor Athelstani est ...
— Thackeray • Anthony Trollope

... I, "you must change your complexion! you must hie to the dyers and be dyed, that I may live. I have but one poor life, White-Jacket, and that life I cannot spare. I cannot consent to die for you, but be dyed you must for me. You can dye many times without injury; ...
— White Jacket - or, the World on a Man-of-War • Herman Melville

... me many a prank. When she is kind, oh, how I go it! But if again she's harsh,—why, then I am a very proper poet! When favoring gales bring in my ships, I hie to Rome and live in clover; Elsewise I steer my skiff out here, And anchor till the storm blows over. Compulsory virtue is the charm Of life upon the ...
— Echoes from the Sabine Farm • Roswell Martin Field and Eugene Field

... Now hie thee back, thou little foot-page, And greet thy lady from me, And tell her that I, her own true love, Will ...
— The Book of Brave Old Ballads • Unknown

... for to-morrow I am off to the Welsh wars to dance with the lords-marchers and Owen Glendower, to a far different strain. Yield not to these leaguering Danes, Philippa, but if thou dost, when I am back from the Welsh wars, I'll hie me over sea ...
— Historic Boys - Their Endeavours, Their Achievements, and Their Times • Elbridge Streeter Brooks

... "Now hie thee," he said, "to the river bank, a salmon thou there shalt find; For nigh to the spot where in stream I sank, it was hurled, and 'twas left behind; To Finnabar take it, and bid her from me that the salmon with skill she broil: In the midst of the fish is the ring: ...
— Heroic Romances of Ireland Volumes 1 and 2 Combined • A. H. Leahy

... Ravenwing And hie me out at night, Scared little birds away would spring An ill-shot arrow's flight: The idle fancy away I fling, Now I ...
— Poetical Works of George MacDonald, Vol. 2 • George MacDonald

... blew awl thyme new ate lief cell dew sell won praise high prays hie be inn ail road rowed by blue tier so all two time knew ate leaf one due sew tear buy lone hare night clime sight tolled site knights maid cede beech waste bred piece sum plum e'er cent son weight tier rein weigh heart wood paws through fur fare main pare beech meet wrest led ...
— The Art Of Writing & Speaking The English Language - Word-Study and Composition & Rhetoric • Sherwin Cody

... not die. See, where my slave, the ugly monster, Death, Shaking and quivering, pale and wan for fear, Stands aiming at me with his murdering dart, Who flies away at every glance I give, And, when I look away, comes stealing on. Villain, away, and hie thee to the field! I and mine army come to load thy back With souls of thousand mangled carcasses. Look, where he goes; but see, he comes again, Because I stay: Techelles, let us march And weary Death with bearing souls to hell. Part II, ...
— The Principles of English Versification • Paull Franklin Baum

... Colignon's recruits travelled mostly of will and at their own charge. In Franken, in Schwaben, in the Rhine Countries, a dissolute son would rob his father,—as shopmen their masters' tills, and managers their cash-boxes,—and hie off to those magnanimous Prussian Officials, who gave away companies like kreutzers, and had a value for young fellows of spirit. They hastened to Magdeburg with their Commissions; where they were ...
— History of Friedrich II. of Prussia, Vol. XIX. (of XXI.) • Thomas Carlyle

... towards the horizon. 'He must be at his Olivettes field now,' he answered, pointing towards the left. 'But Voriau will show your reverence the way. He's sure to know where his master is.' And he clapped his hands and called: 'Hie! Voriau! hie!' ...
— Abbe Mouret's Transgression - La Faute De L'abbe Mouret • Emile Zola

... her kirtle green A little aboon her knee, The lady snooded her yellow hair A little aboon her bree, And she's gane to the good greenwood As fast as she could hie. ...
— Folk-Lore and Legends - Scotland • Anonymous

... merry men who Your coursers’ backs have prest; We’ll hie us to our Lady’s church, And set our hearts ...
— Little Engel - a ballad with a series of epigrams from the Persian - - - Translator: George Borrow • Thomas J. Wise

... unhesitatingly; and this seemed to satisfy the lawyer's doubts, and, rising, he said, shaking his companion by the hand: "Montigny, go. Beat up the bush at Stillyside; and if she be not there,—why all the country side shall be roused to find and bring her back. But, Claude, she is safe. Yet hie you thither; mount again your horse, and bring me word before the day breaks: begone." And in a few moments Claude was scouring back to Stillyside, and the advocate ruminating alone amidst the shadows of ...
— The Advocate • Charles Heavysege

... come to our planet in this way, it seems, and hasten to incarnate themselves in as promising unborn though just begotten men and women as they find, that they may the sooner be free to hie them sunwards ...
— The Martian • George Du Maurier

... audience breaks up. The great trial is ended. The high court of heaven adjourns. The audience hie themselves to their two termini. They rise, they rise! They sink, they sink! Then the blue tent of the sky will be lifted and folded up and put away. Then the auditorium of atmospheric galleries will be melted. Then the folded wings of attendant ...
— New Tabernacle Sermons • Thomas De Witt Talmage

... terror on her face seemed to force the mad words from his lips, the magnetic gaze seemed to hold him spellbound. He bent over hie mother and laid his fresh, brave young face on the cold, white ...
— Daisy Brooks - A Perilous Love • Laura Jean Libbey

... souls that hie them faraway from civilisation, to convents, monasteries, and western plains, that they may keep away from temptation. In the same fashion, woman tries to isolate her lord and master. If he meets women at all, they are those invisibly ...
— The Spinster Book • Myrtle Reed

... be still! For a little while yet! He is lulled in a sleep that will make him forget! O, waken him not, else straight he will hie To the church—and then, alas, ...
— Early Plays - Catiline, The Warrior's Barrow, Olaf Liljekrans • Henrik Ibsen

... your pardon. Mistress Agatha, you're a bad un. 'Tis a burning shame to harry a good old man like Father Jordan. Thee hie to thy bed, and do no more mischief, thou false hussy! I'll tell my dame of thy fine doings when she cometh ...
— The White Lady of Hazelwood - A Tale of the Fourteenth Century • Emily Sarah Holt

... who wish to make the acquaintance of the bird must either resort to some fancier's shop, or hie themselves to the cool heights of Mussoorie, or, better still, of Darjeeling, where the liothrix is exceptionally abundant. But even at Darjeeling the Pekin-robin will have to be looked for carefully, for it is of ...
— Birds of the Indian Hills • Douglas Dewar

... was doomed to wear it for the pride he took in sophisms. As he thus spoke he let fall a drop of sweat on his master's hand, piercing it through. The next day Silo said to his scholars, "I leave croaking to frogs, cawing to crows, and vain things to the vain, and hie me to the logic which ...
— The Destiny of the Soul - A Critical History of the Doctrine of a Future Life • William Rounseville Alger

... you send vs of euery commoditie in that Countrey part, but no great quantitie other then such as is before declared. And likewise euery kinde of Lether, whereof wee bee informed there is great store bought yeerely by the Esterlings and Duches for hie ...
— The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, • Richard Hakluyt

... O Dorset, speak not to me, get thee gone! Death and destruction dog thee at thy heels; Thy mother's name is ominous to children. If thou wilt outstrip death, go cross the seas, And live with Richmond, from the reach of hell: Go, hie thee, hie thee from this slaughter-house, Lest thou increase the number of the dead; And make me die the thrall of Margaret's curse, Nor mother, wife, nor England's ...
— The Life and Death of King Richard III • William Shakespeare [Collins edition]

... leave the sleeping street, Hie me forth on darker roads. Ah! I cannot stay my feet, Onward, onward, something goads. I will take the mountain path, Beard the storm within its den, Know the worst of this dim wrath, Vexing thus ...
— A Hidden Life and Other Poems • George MacDonald

... just—that friend so true; In danger both, and in our cause! Minstrel, the Douglas dare not pause. Why else that solemn warning given, 'If not on earth, we meet in heaven!' Why else, to Cambus-kenneth's fane, If eve return him not again, Am I to hie and make me known? Alas! he goes to Scotland's throne, Buys his friends' safety with his own; He goes to do—what I had done, Had Douglas' daughter ...
— The Lady of the Lake • Sir Walter Scott

... student, devoting several of the early morning hours of each day to practice on the piano-forte. Even during the heated term, when most artists neglect their instruments, and hie away to enjoy the refreshing breezes of the sea-shore or the mountains, he may much of the time be found at his rooms, undeterred by the hot atmosphere, diligently at work keeping up the nice degree of proficiency he has already attained, or bravely attacking ...
— Music and Some Highly Musical People • James M. Trotter

... a fairy-like thing in white glided past the youth, and whispered, "Heed her not, she is an evil genius! Hie thee, young man, for shelter to yonder wood; from its leafy shade thou canst behold the lovely earth with its verdant meadows, rich foliage and brilliant flowers, and the soft, fleecy clouds embracing one another in the azure sky overhead. ...
— Fifty-Two Stories For Girls • Various

... I'll hie me to the bower That thou wi' roses tied, And where wi' mony a blushing bud I strove myself to hide. I'll doat on ilka spot Where I ha'e been wi' thee; And ca' to mind some kindly word By ...
— The World's Best Poetry, Volume 3 - Sorrow and Consolation • Various

... est, summus terror animum eius occupavit. Itaque iussit Herculem capere et ad se reportare cervum quendam; nam minime cupivit tantum virum in regno suo tenere. Hie autem cervus dicebatur aurea cornua et pedes multo[1] celeriores vento[2] habere. Primum Hercules vestigia animalis petivit, deinde, ubi cervum ipsum vidit, omnibus viribus currere incepit. Per plurimos dies contendit nec noctu cessavit. Denique postquam ...
— Latin for Beginners • Benjamin Leonard D'Ooge

... have been at pains to keep these years back. I had it at the sacking of Issodun, and the King himself hath not such a bed. If you throw me, it is thine; but, if I throw you, then you are under a vow to take bow and bill and hie with me to France, there to serve in the White Company as long as we ...
— The White Company • Arthur Conan Doyle

... Rommany churl And the Rommany girl, To-morrow shall hie To poison the sty, And bewitch on the mead ...
— Lavengro - The Scholar, The Gypsy, The Priest • George Borrow



Words linked to "Hie" :   push forward, flash, go, race, shoot, scoot, scud, cannonball along, tear, rush, hotfoot, linger, shoot down, speed, bucket along, thrust ahead, belt along, step on it, dash, travel, locomote, pelt along, barge, buck, hasten, rush along, charge



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