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Give   Listen
verb
Give  v. t.  (past gave; past part. given; pres. part. giving)  
1.
To bestow without receiving a return; to confer without compensation; to impart, as a possession; to grant, as authority or permission; to yield up or allow. "For generous lords had rather give than pay."
2.
To yield possesion of; to deliver over, as property, in exchange for something; to pay; as, we give the value of what we buy. "What shall a man give in exchange for his soul?"
3.
To yield; to furnish; to produce; to emit; as, flint and steel give sparks.
4.
To communicate or announce, as advice, tidings, etc.; to pronounce; to render or utter, as an opinion, a judgment, a sentence, a shout, etc.
5.
To grant power or license to; to permit; to allow; to license; to commission. "It is given me once again to behold my friend." "Then give thy friend to shed the sacred wine."
6.
To exhibit as a product or result; to produce; to show; as, the number of men, divided by the number of ships, gives four hundred to each ship.
7.
To devote; to apply; used reflexively, to devote or apply one's self; as, the soldiers give themselves to plunder; also in this sense used very frequently in the past participle; as, the people are given to luxury and pleasure; the youth is given to study.
8.
(Logic & Math.) To set forth as a known quantity or a known relation, or as a premise from which to reason; used principally in the passive form given.
9.
To allow or admit by way of supposition. "I give not heaven for lost."
10.
To attribute; to assign; to adjudge. "I don't wonder at people's giving him to me as a lover."
11.
To excite or cause to exist, as a sensation; as, to give offense; to give pleasure or pain.
12.
To pledge; as, to give one's word.
13.
To cause; to make; with the infinitive; as, to give one to understand, to know, etc. "But there the duke was given to understand That in a gondola were seen together Lorenzo and his amorous Jessica."
14.
To afford a view of; as, his window gave the park.
To give away, to make over to another; to transfer. "Whatsoever we employ in charitable uses during our lives, is given away from ourselves."
To give back, to return; to restore.
To give the bag, to cheat. (Obs.) "I fear our ears have given us the bag."
To give birth to.
(a)
To bear or bring forth, as a child.
(b)
To originate; to give existence to, as an enterprise, idea.
To give chase, to pursue.
To give ear to. See under Ear.
To give forth, to give out; to publish; to tell.
To give ground. See under Ground, n.
To give the hand, to pledge friendship or faith.
To give the hand of, to espouse; to bestow in marriage.
To give the head. See under Head, n.
To give in.
(a)
To abate; to deduct.
(b)
To declare; to make known; to announce; to tender; as, to give in one's adhesion to a party.
To give the lie to (a person), to tell (him) that he lies.
To give line. See under Line.
To give off, to emit, as steam, vapor, odor, etc.
To give one's self away, to make an inconsiderate surrender of one's cause, an unintentional disclosure of one's purposes, or the like. (Colloq.)
To give out.
(a)
To utter publicly; to report; to announce or declare. "One that gives out himself Prince Florizel." "Give out you are of Epidamnum."
(b)
To send out; to emit; to distribute; as, a substance gives out steam or odors.
To give over.
(a)
To yield completely; to quit; to abandon.
(b)
To despair of.
(c)
To addict, resign, or apply (one's self). "The Babylonians had given themselves over to all manner of vice."
To give place, to withdraw; to yield one's claim.
To give points.
(a)
In games of skill, to equalize chances by conceding a certain advantage; to allow a handicap.
(b)
To give useful suggestions. (Colloq.)
To give rein. See under Rein, n.
To give the sack. Same as To give the bag.
To give and take.
(a)
To average gains and losses.
(b)
To exchange freely, as blows, sarcasms, etc.
To give time (Law), to accord extension or forbearance to a debtor.
To give the time of day, to salute one with the compliment appropriate to the hour, as "good morning." "good evening", etc.
To give tongue, in hunter's phrase, to bark; said of dogs.
To give up.
(a)
To abandon; to surrender. "Don't give up the ship." "He has... given up For certain drops of salt, your city Rome."
(b)
To make public; to reveal. "I'll not state them By giving up their characters."
(c)
(Used also reflexively.)
To give up the ghost. See under Ghost.
To give one's self up, to abandon hope; to despair; to surrender one's self.
To give way.
(a)
To withdraw; to give place.
(b)
To yield to force or pressure; as, the scaffolding gave way.
(c)
(Naut.) To begin to row; or to row with increased energy.
(d)
(Stock Exchange) To depreciate or decline in value; as, railroad securities gave way two per cent.
To give way together, to row in time; to keep stroke.
Synonyms: To Give, Confer, Grant. To give is the generic word, embracing all the rest. To confer was originally used of persons in power, who gave permanent grants or privileges; as, to confer the order of knighthood; and hence it still denotes the giving of something which might have been withheld; as, to confer a favor. To grant is to give in answer to a petition or request, or to one who is in some way dependent or inferior.






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Give" Quotes from Famous Books



... followers, and beloved by the small inner group of family friends, the great majority of his colleagues, official subordinates, and political or ecclesiastical associates felt for him rather respect than affection, and would have hesitated to give him any of friendship's confidences. It was regretfully observed that though he was kindly and considerate, would acknowledge all good service, and gladly offer to a junior an opportunity of distinction, he seldom seemed sufficiently ...
— William Ewart Gladstone • James Bryce

... of the value of the hickory for shade and nuts and for many commercial wood products it is important that the people of a community, county or state who are in any manner interested in the protection of this class of trees, should give encouragement and support to any concerted or cooperative effort on the part of the owners towards the proper control of the hickory ...
— Northern Nut Growers Association Report of the Proceedings at the Second Annual Meeting - Ithaca, New York, December 14 and 15, 1911 • Northern Nut Growers Association

... have worke sufficient, without any more accrease. Some man complaineth more that death doth hinder him from the assured course of an hoped for victorie, than of death it selfe; another cries out, he should give place to her, before he have married his daughter, or directed the course of his childrens bringing up; another bewaileth he must forgoe his wives company; another moaneth the losse of his children, the chiefest commodities of his being. I am now by meanes ...
— Literary and Philosophical Essays • Various

... statement that encouragement of excessive competition, inside or outside the school, for any purpose whatsoever, is costly and damaging to the whole being, and that, in the opinion of the Committee, nothing needs to be impressed more strongly on parents and school-teachers than Froebel's injunction, "Give space and ...
— Mental Defectives and Sexual Offenders • W. H. Triggs, Donald McGavin, Frederick Truby King, J. Sands Elliot, Ada G. Patterson, C.E. Matthews

... historical interest. Many of these are old churches; hence, the Swedish idiom for the symbol is 'kyrka', cognate to English 'church' and Scots-dialect 'kirk' but pronounced /shir'k*/ in modern Swedish. This is in fact where Apple got the symbol; they give ...
— THE JARGON FILE, VERSION 2.9.10

... account deficits could be future problems. Unemployment is down to 8.7% as job creation continues in the rebounding economy; inflation is up to 3.8% but still moderate. The EU put the Czech Republic just behind Poland and Hungary in preparations for accession, which will give further impetus and direction to structural reform. Moves to complete banking, telecommunications and energy privatization will add to foreign investment, while intensified restructuring among large enterprises and banks ...
— The 2001 CIA World Factbook • United States. Central Intelligence Agency.

... thousands of years old; rationally we are embryos"{1}; and many people who deem themselves "emancipated" are willing for once in the year to plunge into the stream of tradition, merge themselves in inherited social custom, and give way to sentiments and impressions which in their more reflective moments they spurn. Most men are ready at Christmas to put themselves into an instinctive rather than a rational attitude, to drink of the springs of wonder, and return in some degree to earlier, less intellectual stages ...
— Christmas in Ritual and Tradition, Christian and Pagan • Clement A. Miles

... eschatology, and their perfect harmony with known Pharisaic beliefs, prove their mutual consonance and the derivation of the later from the earlier. If the supposed Christian views had been unheard of before, their promulgators would have taken pains to define them carefully and give detailed expositions of them. Thirdly, it was natural almost inevitable that the apostles would retain at least some of their original peculiarities of belief, and mix them with their new ideas, unless they were prevented by an infallible inspiration. Of the presence of ...
— The Destiny of the Soul - A Critical History of the Doctrine of a Future Life • William Rounseville Alger

... [Footnote 338: John Eliot. Give as full an account as you can of the life and works of this noble Apostle to the Indians of ...
— Essays • Ralph Waldo Emerson

... EUROPE (drawn specially for this work).—These give roughly the limits within which the inland geographical knowledge of the ancients reach some degrees ...
— The Story of Geographical Discovery - How the World Became Known • Joseph Jacobs

... of liberty had always been allowed to the slave to cheer the hardships of his condition. But the Americans of the South are well aware that emancipation cannot but be dangerous, when the freed man can never be assimilated to his former master. To give a man his freedom, and to leave him in wretchedness and ignominy, is nothing less than to prepare a future chief for a revolt of the slaves. Moreover, it has long been remarked that the presence of a free negro vaguely ...
— Democracy In America, Volume 1 (of 2) • Alexis de Tocqueville

... suffrage must ultimately rest. I know I stand nearly alone in this, but I believe from my soul that the woman movement is fundamentally anti-Christian, and can find no deep justification but in the ideas, the spirit, and the faith of free religion. Until women come to see this too, and to give their united influence to this latter faith, political power in their hands would destroy even that measure of liberty which free-thinkers of both sexes have painfully established by the sacrifices of many generations. ...
— History of Woman Suffrage, Volume III (of III) • Various

... not give it up!" cried Helen almost fiercely, while the slumbering fire of her southern nature flashed into her face. "You have waited so long, worked so hard, suffered so much, you must not lose your reward. You promised, and you must keep ...
— The Mysterious Key And What It Opened • Louisa May Alcott

... it?" said Mr. Prince gravely. "Pity she ever did give up painting, I think," he added ...
— The Roll-Call • Arnold Bennett

... a light brown; add the gravy (hot water may be substituted for this), thicken with a little butter and flour, and stew gently about 1/4 hour; season with pepper, salt, and pounded mace; add the ketchup, sherry, and lemon-juice; give one boil, and serve. Garnish the dish with forcemeat balls and fried ...
— The Book of Household Management • Mrs. Isabella Beeton

... our examinations. I at once wrote to him stating that I had carefully looked through all our examination papers and had not been able to find one question even remotely resembling any of these questions which he alleged had been asked, and that I would be greatly obliged if he would give me the name of the "bright young man" who had ...
— Theodore Roosevelt - An Autobiography by Theodore Roosevelt • Theodore Roosevelt

... and very cold weather, when one day the two elder brothers had gone out, with their usual warning to little Gluck, who was left to mind the roast, that he was to let nobody in, and give nothing out. Gluck sat down quite close to the fire, for it was raining very hard, and the kitchen walls were by no means dry or comfortable looking. He turned and turned, and the roast got nice and brown. ...
— Children's Literature - A Textbook of Sources for Teachers and Teacher-Training Classes • Charles Madison Curry

... anxiously awaiting Peveril's coming, was at the landing to meet his friend, and was much disappointed at his non-appearance. After gaining all the news concerning the missing party that Captain Spillins could give him, he hastened back to Red Jacket, and went at once to the Trefethen cottage with a faint hope that ...
— The Copper Princess - A Story of Lake Superior Mines • Kirk Munroe

... and discontented. He longed to begin the fight, and could not sleep for thinking of it. Like Giovanni, he was strong and revengeful; but Giovanni had from his mother a certain slowness of temperament, which often deterred him from action just long enough to give him time for reflection, whereas the father, when roused, and he was roused easily, loved to strike at once. It chanced one evening, in a great house, that Saracinesca came upon the Cardinal standing alone in an outer room. He was on his way into the reception; ...
— Saracinesca • F. Marion Crawford

... THE LONDON MARKET.—From Mr. Mayhew's work on "London Labour and the London Poor," and other sources, we are enabled to give the following table of the total annual supply of ...
— The Book of Household Management • Mrs. Isabella Beeton

... men that certain theological opinions are identical with religion, until they believe it. The time comes when they cannot hold those opinions any more, and they break away; and they give up religion, and perhaps the sanctities of life, which they are ...
— Our Unitarian Gospel • Minot Savage

... the lake, there is another deep bay that receives the waters of a river which communicates with Great Marten Lake where the North-West Company had once a post established. The eastern shores of the Great Slave Lake are very imperfectly known: none of the traders have visited them and the Indians give such loose and unsatisfactory accounts that no estimation can be formed of its extent in that direction. These men say there is a communication from its eastern extremity by a chain of lakes with a ...
— The Journey to the Polar Sea • John Franklin

... caught. One must wait—wait till her desire to have a soul bids her come to us. She has come! A soul is hers: and see how, instantly, the old monster, the world, which has no soul—not yet: we are helping it to get one—becomes a shadow, powerless to stop or overawe. For I do give you a soul, think as you will of it. I give you strength to realize, courage to act. It is the soul that does things in this life—the rest is vapour. How do we distinguish love?—as we do music by the pure note ...
— The Shaving of Shagpat • George Meredith

... "Give me the dish and coffee-cup," she whispered, impatiently. "Suppose the waiter came and had to look ...
— The Literary World Seventh Reader • Various

... of a long silence, she lifted her head. "I give you best, partner," she said, and held out her hand to him with a difficult smile. "I'd no right—to kick over the traces—like that. I'm going to be ...
— The Top of the World • Ethel M. Dell

... light?... You should, on the contrary, rejoice at it.... And why do you find it melancholy that this adorable saint should be the daughter of a thief?... How I wish that you were really my pupil, and that it would not be too absurd to give you here, in this corner of the hall, a lesson in intellectuality!... I would say to you, when you see one of those anomalies which renders you indignant, think of the causes. It is so easy. Although Protestant, Fanny is of Jewish ...
— Cosmopolis, Complete • Paul Bourget

... so dreadfully literal!" she shrugged, brushing her straight, sensitive nose with the pink blossom; "I only said it to give you a chance. ... If you are going to be stupid, good night!" But she made no movement to go. ... "Yes, then; I have avoided you. And it doesn't become you ...
— The Fighting Chance • Robert W. Chambers

... according to the author, is an attempt to "trace the personality of Andrew Johnson through the years 1862-1865 when the burden of military government and reconstruction in Tennessee rested principally upon his shoulders." The author has intentionally neglected to give detailed treatment of the military administration in West Tennessee by the generals of the regular army and also of the Federal trade regulations in the State. No effort is here made to trace the ...
— The Journal of Negro History, Volume 2, 1917 • Various

... the bright side of the situation. How delighted Keats will be when at last the world develops a little sense of proportion, and after first neglecting and then over-praising him, finally proposes to give poor old Severn his due as a master by proxy. Imagine Sir William Herschel's pleasure when his beloved sister Caroline begins to receive her full deserts. And Tschaikowsky will slough his morbidness and improvise a Slavic Hallelujah Chorus when ...
— The Joyful Heart • Robert Haven Schauffler

... that it teaches, the very titles of the chapters bear biblical phrases and classical moralising as their style. I should be sorry to guarantee the accuracy of the local colouring and the detail of its elaborate history; but the life, realism, and pictorial brilliancy of the scenes give it a power which is rare indeed in an historical novel. It has not the great and full knowledge of Romola, much less the consummate style and setting of Esmond; but it has a vividness, a rapidity, a definiteness which completely enthral the imagination and stamp ...
— Studies in Early Victorian Literature • Frederic Harrison

... unphysical. She was certainly feeling what people call "depressed." No doubt this unusual depression—for she had been born with a singularly cheerful spirit—was caused by the resolution she had taken to give up Welsley. Perhaps Welsley meant more to her even than she had supposed. But it was absurd—wasn't it?—to be so dominated by places. People, certain people, might mean everything in the life of a woman; many women lived, really lived, only in and through their ...
— In the Wilderness • Robert Hichens

... Travellers who have watched the process describe the untiring way in which both the male and female beetle roll these pellets, often falling down with their burden into holes and ridges in the rough ground; but then their comrades will give them help, and, picking up the ball, they patiently labour on. Walking backwards, having the pellet between their broad hind legs, they push it up and up until it is placed in safety. The persevering energy of this insect led the Egyptians to adopt it as an emblem of the labours of their great ...
— Wild Nature Won By Kindness • Elizabeth Brightwen

... souls of men—- Man's soul, and it's a fire, smoke ... no, it's not ... It's vapor done up like a new-born babe— 185 (In that shape when you die it leaves your mouth) It's ... well, what matters talking, it's the soul! Give us no more of body than shows soul! Here's Giotto, with his Saint a-praising God, That sets us praising—why not stop with him? 190 Why put all thoughts of praise out of our head With wonder at lines, colors, and what not? Paint the soul; never mind the legs and arms! Rub all out; try ...
— Selections from the Poems and Plays of Robert Browning • Robert Browning

... mean them sketches," said Sir Bingo. "I'll give you a handsome order for them, if you will tell me. I ...
— St. Ronan's Well • Sir Walter Scott

... shoulder, dragging back from his encircling arm or otherwise impeding the freedom of his movements, they materially add to his labour and take from his pleasure in the dance. They should endeavour to lean as lightly, and give as little trouble, as possible; for, however flattering to the vanity of the nobler sex may be the idea of feminine dependence, we question whether the reality, in the shape of a dead weight upon their aching arms throughout a Polka or Valse of twenty minutes' duration, would be acceptable to ...
— Routledge's Manual of Etiquette • George Routledge

... basket," he answered. "When Margy and I went to get a drink of water I saw the popgun in the train boy's basket, and I took it out. I thought maybe I'd want to shoot at a snow man me and Grandpa are going to make, so I kept the gun. Daddy can give the train boy a penny for it. I hid it in the seat. Then I saw Margy's doll on the seat in front, and she was asleep—Margy was—and I shot at the doll, but I didn't ...
— Six Little Bunkers at Grandpa Ford's • Laura Lee Hope

... objects; it must not presume to start from the conception which it has gained, and to deduce from it the moral laws themselves. For it was these very laws, the internal practical necessity of which led us to the hypothesis of an independent cause, or of a wise ruler of the universe, who should give them effect. Hence we are not entitled to regard them as accidental and derived from the mere will of the ruler, especially as we have no conception of such a will, except as formed in accordance with these laws. So far, then, as practical reason has the right to conduct us, we shall ...
— The Critique of Pure Reason • Immanuel Kant

... up'n say he bleedzd ter bleeve Brer Rabbit got dem fishes. Brer Rabbit 'ny it up en down, but Brer Wolf stan' to it dat Brer Rabbit got dem fishes. Brer Rabbit, he say dat if Brer Wolf b'leeve he got de fishes, den he give Brer Wolf lief fer ter kill de bes' cow he got. Brer Wolf, he tuck Brer Rabbit at his word, en go off ter de pastur' en drive up de cattle en ...
— Uncle Remus • Joel Chandler Harris

... Calvinistic predestination. They distinctly affirm that sin is the necessary means of the greatest good, and, as such, so far. as it exists, is preferable on the whole to holiness in its stead—that its existence is, on the whole, for the best. I give as authority for this affirmation, a publication of the Presbyterian Board, entitled Old and New Theology. On the first page we find this explicit statement: "It has been a common sentiment among New ...
— The Calvinistic Doctrine of Predestination Examined and Refuted • Francis Hodgson

... the spectacles. Turly, Turly, look about for Nurse's spectacles. Oh, there they are on the chimney-piece! Take them out of the case quick, and give ...
— Terry - Or, She ought to have been a Boy • Rosa Mulholland

... have brought forth children, they suckle and rear them in temples set apart for all. They give milk for two years or more as the physician orders. After that time the weaned child is given into the charge of the mistresses, if it is a female, and to the masters, if it is a male. And then with other young children ...
— Ideal Commonwealths • Various

... of their own or deserting the local merchants. Farm Bureau associations have in numerous cases made arrangements with a local dealer whereby he would handle their seeds, fertilizers, or spraying materials at a specified rate of profit, upon condition that they give him all their trade in these articles and place their orders in advance. This principle of collective buying through an established merchant at an agreed rate of profit has much to commend it, and is being utilized ...
— The Farmer and His Community • Dwight Sanderson

... big guns on them, Jim; get out your best sermon, the one on 'Show thyself a man' (1 Kings II:2). Keep that for the big crowd in the evening. Next Sunday, at the Congregational Church you can give them the same thing, for it will be a different crowd; but at night, why not give them your sermon on 'Kindness' that made such ...
— The Preacher of Cedar Mountain - A Tale of the Open Country • Ernest Thompson Seton

... a Lincolnshire man like Flinders himself, born at Aswarby near Sleaford. He was a farmer's son, but his father died when he was quite a child, and his mother moved to Boston. She managed out of her widow's resources to give her son an excellent education, and designed that he should enter the medical profession. In due course he was apprenticed to a Boston surgeon, Mr. Francis—a common mode of securing training in medicine at that period. He "walked" ...
— The Life of Captain Matthew Flinders • Ernest Scott

... discipline, government, order, etc., are the expressions of this inherent social spirit; in so far as the methods used are those that appeal to the active and constructive powers, permitting the child to give out and thus to serve; in so far as the curriculum is so selected and organized as to provide the material for affording the child a consciousness of the world in which he has to play a part, and the demands he has to meet; so far as these ends are met, the school is organized on an ethical basis. ...
— Moral Principles in Education • John Dewey

... "I'd rather you'd give it to some one else," said she with a curtesy. "It doesn't belong to me. I wouldn't have gone to the head ...
— The Pot of Gold - And Other Stories • Mary E. Wilkins

... she inwardly, "in what way can I raise five hundred maravedis to be quits with the Moor who will give back his sight to my poor old father? All! I have it. I am a pretty maid, and suitors innumerable, commoners and nobles, pay their addresses and compliments to me. But all are trifling youths who only care for love-making and who seek light o' loves rather than spouses according to the law of ...
— First Love (Little Blue Book #1195) - And Other Fascinating Stories of Spanish Life • Various

... in all, the Incas are indeed an interesting people. We believe, however, their culture has been greatly overrated. Our object in this chapter has been to give an outline of the Incas and the tribes subject to them. It is impossible in these few pages to give more than an outline. Should the reader, by the perusal of these pages, acquire an interest in the culture of the Andean ...
— The Prehistoric World - Vanished Races • E. A. Allen

... these gentlemen has a special view on the subject, each favours a special mode of combat, and each, of course, has his following among the townspeople. But the masses give them little heed. ...
— With Those Who Wait • Frances Wilson Huard

... who is supreme over all, the patron of order, the fountain of justice, and the protector, in all ages of the world, of virtuous liberty, continue his blessing upon this nation and its government, and give it all possible success and duration, consistent with ...
— The World's Best Orations, Vol. 1 (of 10) • Various

... quoth the Spanish general, 'Come, let us march away, I fear we shall be spoiled all If that we longer stay: For yonder comes Lord Willoughby With courage fierce and fell, He will not give one inch of ground For ...
— Lyra Heroica - A Book of Verse for Boys • Various

... rose to the new demands made upon it. He at once decided on a bold and comprehensive scheme which would secure the whole coast from Port Royal to Chesapeake Bay, and would ultimately give Spain exclusive possession of the South Seas and the Newfoundland fisheries. The Spanish captain had a mind which could at once conceive a wide scheme and labor at the execution of details. So resolutely were operations carried on that by June, 1565, Menendez sailed from Cadiz with thirty-four ...
— Great Epochs in American History, Vol. II - The Planting Of The First Colonies: 1562—1733 • Various

... the glasses over their eyes, keeping the helmet face-plates partly open. The rayguns they eased in their belt holsters, and slid back the hinged palms of their mittens, to give exit if need be to ...
— The Passing of Ku Sui • Anthony Gilmore

... her loose. She just froze to me like a person drowning, and that husband of hers, who had come up on the last car, hunting for his wife, who had eloped, pulled a long blue gun and told me he would give me five minutes to pray, and then he would kill me and throw my body down in ...
— Peck's Bad Boy Abroad • George W. Peck

... man or woman yet that I could trust, or in whom I could think myself safe, but that I saw he was so disinterestedly concerned for my safety, that I said I would freely trust him with the management of that little I had, if he would accept to be steward for a poor widow that could give ...
— The Fortunes and Misfortunes of the Famous Moll Flanders &c. • Daniel Defoe

... from his chair. "I'll give you five minutes in which to find something to tell," he exclaimed, shaking a trembling finger at the culprit; then stalked out ...
— The Dreamer - A Romantic Rendering of the Life-Story of Edgar Allan Poe • Mary Newton Stanard

... that however these questions be settled, this is a truth, independent of them, but being forgotten amidst the dust of controversy, that the next life is a life of retribution, and that there you and I will give account of our deeds, and chiefly of our attitude ...
— Expositions of Holy Scripture - St. Matthew Chaps. IX to XXVIII • Alexander Maclaren

... established in Tashkent international: linked by landline or microwave radio relay with CIS member states and to other countries by leased connection via the Moscow international gateway switch; new Intelsat links to Tokyo and Ankara give Uzbekistan international access independent of Russian facilities; satellite earth ...
— The 1998 CIA World Factbook • United States. Central Intelligence Agency.

... Rat, by Thomas Percy, D. D., Chaplain in Ordinary to his Majesty,' (laughing immoderately). BOSWELL. 'I am afraid a court chaplain could not decently write of the grey rat.' JOHNSON. 'Sir, he need not give it the name of the Hanover rat.' Thus could he indulge a luxuriant sportive imagination, when talking of a friend whom ...
— Life of Johnson - Abridged and Edited, with an Introduction by Charles Grosvenor Osgood • James Boswell

... Ain't it hard to be sick away from home?" Slap—slap. "Well, I declare, what do you suppose we'd better do about it? Shan't we send for the doctor? Poor fellow!" Slap—slap. "Ah! ah! ah!" Kipping's voice hardened. "You blinking, bloody old fool. You would turn on me, would you? You would give me one, would you? You would sojer round the deck and say you're sick, would you? I 'll show ...
— The Mutineers • Charles Boardman Hawes

... despair, in longing, in—itself. He would always remember it, moonlit like that; and the faint sweet reek of the river and the shivering of the willow leaves. She had everything in the world that he could give her, except the one thing that she could not have because of him! The perversity of things hurt him at that moment, as might ...
— Forsyte Saga • John Galsworthy

... denotes an "individual," "one who cannot be mistaken for another," and, as the Samoyeds were never cannibals, Serebrenikoff gives a preference to the latter name, which is used by the Russians at Chabarova, and appears to be a literal translation of the name which the Samoyeds give themselves. Nordenskiold, however, considers it probable that the old tradition of man-eaters (androphagi), living in the north, which onginated with Herodotus, and was afterwards universally adopted in the geographical literature of the Middle Ages, ...
— The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, • Richard Hakluyt

... hard," she went on. "Whenever we give pain we are hard. And we MUST give pain; that's the world,—the hateful, miserable world! Ah!" and she gave a long, deep sigh, "I can't even say I am glad to have known you—though I am. That too is to wrong you. I can say nothing that is not cruel. Therefore ...
— The American • Henry James

... or submits to Christian difficulty, for the sake of going to heaven. At least, if he does, he has got on the wrong tack altogether. But if the motive for both endurance and activity be faith and love, then hope has a perfect right to come in as a subsidiary motive, and to give strength to the faith and rapture to the love. We cannot afford to throw away that hope, as so many of us do—not perhaps, intellectually, though I am afraid there is a very considerable dimming of the clearness, and ...
— Expositions Of Holy Scripture - Volume I: St. Luke, Chaps. I to XII • Alexander Maclaren

... his crowd," declared Spider Sexton, wisely, "for as scouts we are educated to observe things, and first of all we notice that none of you has come back with the pack he took away. That tells us the story. But please go on and give the particulars, Paul." ...
— The Banner Boy Scouts Snowbound - A Tour on Skates and Iceboats • George A. Warren

... look as if you was seein' suthin'—you give me the creeps," returned Uncle Billy a little petulantly. "Let's turn in, afore the fire ...
— Stories in Light and Shadow • Bret Harte

... who shall come to welcome me in the realm of strange sight. Will the loving Jesus grant me pardon and give my soul a soothing sleep? or will my warrior father greet me and receive me as his son? Will my spirit fly upward to a happy heaven? or shall I sink into the bottomless pit, an outcast from a God ...
— American Indian stories • Zitkala-Sa

... that it was only intellect feigning heart, though with perfect success. The tenderness and caprice of the woman, and the pride and dignity of the Queen, are all there. She would not be the consummate artist she is if she could not give them. But even through your tears you see that it is art. It is, indeed, concealed by its own perfection, but it is not lost in the loveliness of the character it suggests, as might be the case with a greatly ...
— Literary and Social Essays • George William Curtis

... a relapse had taken place, and that the medical attendants had given up all hope. The public mind was greatly disturbed; but there was no disposition to tumult. The Duke of York, who had already taken on himself to give orders, ascertained that the City was perfectly quiet, and that he might without difficulty be proclaimed as soon as ...
— The History of England from the Accession of James II. - Volume 1 (of 5) • Thomas Babington Macaulay

... they want to live with me. So, it ought to be an easy matter to please us all. As to the house and furnishings, they are all mine, but if the sisters prefer to live here, and let me go elsewhere, I am willing to give them the house and ...
— Vicky Van • Carolyn Wells

... cook used to do 'em at Lady Weston's," Betsy said, looking on with unbelieving eyes. She was sure of this negative, but she was not sure of anything else, and utterly failed to give any active assistance, after driving the girl desperate with her criticisms. Altogether it was a confused and unpleasant day. When Reginald came in in the morning, his sister had no time to speak to him, so anxious was she and pre-occupied, ...
— Phoebe, Junior • Mrs [Margaret] Oliphant

... 'that's interesting. But I think I'll give the keeper the opportunity of moving me. Why, it's quite fine, the sun's coming out, and the sparrows are hopping round—cheeky little devils! I'm not sure that ...
— Tales of the Five Towns • Arnold Bennett

... thought it my duty to aduertise yo{r} ho: of dyw{r}se misdemeano{rs} comytted against her Ma{te} in and about the Tower, when yo{r} lo{p} shall please to command me to attend yo{u} in the meane tyme I hold it most fytt to give yo{u} to vnderstand that vnderstandinge of Mr. Anthonie Paynter should make his vawnt of his playnes and truth of thencising of his fathers place being deputye vnto him thus much I am able to averr that in false entryes ...
— The Palace of Pleasure, Volume 1 • William Painter

... "Give them to me; I'll get them changed." She took those three bills, and,—I do not know how she went about it,—brought three yen in silver. I forget now upon what I spent the three yen. "I'll pay you back soon," I said at the time, but didn't. I could not now pay it back even if I wished ...
— Botchan (Master Darling) • Mr. Kin-nosuke Natsume, trans. by Yasotaro Morri

... fire that through those silken lashes In darkest glances seems to roll, From eyes that cannot hide their flashes: And as along her bosom steal In lengthened flow her raven tresses, You'd swear each clustering lock could feel, And curled to give her neck caresses. ...
— The Works Of Lord Byron, Vol. 3 (of 7) • Lord Byron

... eyes with her own just long enough to make him feel that in the give-and-take of glances hers did not drop or evade, and he, trained in the niceties of diplomatic warfare, ...
— The Lighted Match • Charles Neville Buck

... make an excellent merchantman, and I would be willing to rent her of you and give you one ...
— The Real America in Romance, Volume 6; A Century Too Soon (A Story - of Bacon's Rebellion) • John R. Musick

... secret that the Spaniards would rather attack England than France, because their war against England, being coloured by a religious motive, would be much less odious, and would even have a specious pretext. Moreover the conquest of England would give them an excellent vantage ground to recover what they had lost in the Netherlands. If, on the contrary, the enemy should throw himself with his whole force upon France, the king, who would perhaps ...
— The Rise of the Dutch Republic, 1555-1566 • John Lothrop Motley

... lame girl could n't walk a step. But the sun began to shine,—that is the first thing that happened. Day after day the sun shone, because everything seems to help the people and the things that help themselves. The rich earth gave everything it had to give for sap, and the warm air dried up the ugly moss that spoiled ...
— Polly Oliver's Problem • Kate Douglas Smith Wiggin

... great pleasure to me if I could think that my letters were of the least use to you. I must have expressed myself badly for you to suppose that I look at islands being stocked by occasional transport as a well-established hypothesis. We both give up creation, and therefore have to account for the inhabitants of islands either by continental extensions or by occasional transport. Now, all that I maintain is that of these two alternatives, one of which must be admitted, notwithstanding very many difficulties, occasional transport ...
— More Letters of Charles Darwin - Volume I (of II) • Charles Darwin

... .3 gram of gold, give the loss as .157, .107 and .057 per cent. respectively. The effect of copper, on the other hand, is to increase the cupellation loss, which, silver being absent, may from this cause rise to .3 per cent., even when the ...
— A Textbook of Assaying: For the Use of Those Connected with Mines. • Cornelius Beringer and John Jacob Beringer

... retain my position of organist, and retain it until I have accumulated sufficient means to go abroad and prepare myself for the musical career in which I know I can excel. I am young, strong and ambitious. My unusual sorrows will give me greater power of character if I accept them as spiritual ...
— An Ambitious Man • Ella Wheeler Wilcox

... thanks for the rest of your life; but, remember this, if your tongue ever injures my daughter you will see me again. Go!—How much 'dot' do you give her?" she continued, ...
— Juana • Honore de Balzac

... that was the tutor's very English name—was so dramatic in the expression of his good feeling that Miss Featherstone could not repress a smile as she turned to the physician, and, taking out her pencil and a little memorandum-book, said, "If you'll give me directions, Doctor Harris, I think that I'm perfectly competent to take care ...
— Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science, Vol. 26, September 1880 • Various

... no. What do I want of the telegraph operator? I want Johnston, but I'd give more for that —— old woman's scalp and that dog's life than I would for a dozen Johnstons and all the horses in ...
— Twenty Years of Hus'ling • J. P. Johnston

... entered the room. There were two or three for Mr. Burton, two for Cecilia, and then two besides the registered packet for Florence. For that a receipt was needed, and as Florence had seen the address and recognized the writing, she was hardly able to give her signature. As soon as the maid was gone Cecilia could keep her seat no longer. "I know those are from Clavering," she said, rising from her chair, and coming round to the side of the table. Florence instinctively swept the packet into her lap, and, leaning forward, covered the letters with her ...
— The Claverings • Anthony Trollope

... my hand, then, to give or to withhold, to make or to break?" Kaid chuckled to have this tribute, as he thought, from a Christian, who did not blink at ...
— The Judgment House • Gilbert Parker

... Mothers carried their babes to the meeting-house in preference to remaining at home in the absence of husbands and neighbors. The Sabbath patrol was not only for the purpose of looking for Indians, but to mark the absentees from worship, note what they were doing, and give information accordingly to the authorities. These patrols were chosen from the leading men of the community—the most active, vigilant and sensible—and one can easily perceive that much ill-will might ...
— The Witch of Salem - or Credulity Run Mad • John R. Musick

... cried Madame, and a flash went over her face. Then she changed into a sort of wheedling. "No—no. I shan't take it! I shan't take it. You don't want to give away such ...
— The Lost Girl • D. H. Lawrence

... didn't second that or give him any warm invitation like saying, "yes, and stay a week." They spoke never a word—just looked and listened—looked at the few marbles left in their own hands, and listened to the "chink, chink, chink" of Fatty's pockets as he walked ...
— Half-Past Seven Stories • Robert Gordon Anderson

... felt for some time I should give my experience in mental surgery. In May, 1902, going home for lunch, on a bicycle, and while riding down a hill at a rapid gait, I was thrown from the wheel, and falling on my left side with my arm under my head, the bone was broken about half-way between the shoulder and elbow. While the pain ...
— Science and Health With Key to the Scriptures • Mary Baker Eddy

... which Jim Gulpin buried here. You know what I mean; and let me tell you that a civil and correct answer will stand your friend, just at this time. You have no police to fall back upon, and if I but give the word, your lives are not ...
— The Gold Hunter's Adventures - Or, Life in Australia • William H. Thomes

... Give us, then, no ale nor porter, Logwood wine, nor other drugs; But a glass of sparkling water Filled ...
— Punchinello, Vol.1, No. 4, April 23, 1870 • Various

... them how their conduct was tarnishing the glory which they had acquired by nine years of heroism. They answered with their former cynicism, that glory could be put neither into pocket nor stomach. They had no use for it; they had more than enough of it. Give them money, or give them a City, these were their ...
— The Rise of the Dutch Republic, 1555-1566 • John Lothrop Motley

... polled as one constituency, otherwise the necessary grouping could not take place. This change is not in itself sufficient, because if Birmingham were polled as one constituency electing seven members, and if each elector could give, as with the "block" vote, one vote apiece to seven candidates, then the seven nominees of the majority would all receive a higher number of votes than the seven nominees of the minority. In the numerical case cited ...
— Proportional Representation - A Study in Methods of Election • John H. Humphreys

... friends in both houses of Congress worked out a new policy during the years 1845 to 1850. It was to induce the Federal Government to give large tracts of public land to the Northwestern States on condition that they be given again by the States to railroad corporations as aids to the building of new lines. The roads would sell their lands at good prices, the Government would sell its remaining lands at high prices after the ...
— Expansion and Conflict • William E. Dodd

... an appeal to the deity, a demand that a god shall intervene and indicate his will under the conditions prepared by men, the assumption being that the god has prepared the event or thing in question, and that, when properly approached, he will be disposed to give his worshipers the assistance desired. The casting of lots and similar random procedures have been common methods of divination the world over. The African Kafir diviner detects criminals by the fall of small objects ...
— Introduction to the History of Religions - Handbooks on the History of Religions, Volume IV • Crawford Howell Toy

... a popular ditty, To bring to me shekels and fame, And the only right way one may write one to-day Is to give it some Irish girl's name. There's "Rosy O'Grady," that dear "steady lady," And sweet "Annie Rooney" and such, But mine shall be nearly original, really, For ...
— Cape Cod Ballads, and Other Verse • Joseph C. Lincoln

... sleep in the kitchen; at present one is awake. Watch for my signal, and if they all three sleep, I will manage to slip the bolt. Then you must give me time to get back into bed, and when you hear me snore you may make the attempt. They are all three sleeping on the floor, so be very careful where you tread; I will also leave the front door a little open, so that you can ...
— Fashionable Philosophy - and Other Sketches • Laurence Oliphant

... were ransacking and robbing, and red-reavering earth, sea, and sky; yet all things there are consentaneous with one grand design, which, when consummated, is a Whole that seems to typify the universe. Others give you but fragments—but such as awaken imaginations of beauty and of power transcendent, like that famous Torso. And some show you Nature glimmering beneath a veil which, nunlike, she has religiously taken; and ...
— Recreations of Christopher North, Volume 2 • John Wilson

... the hut, Petya sat down at a distance from him, considering it beneath his dignity to pay attention to him. But he fingered the money in his pocket and wondered whether it would seem ridiculous to give some to the ...
— War and Peace • Leo Tolstoy

... had elapsed since Crabbe's last appearance as an author, and he seems to have thought it due to his readers to give some reason for his long abstention from the poet's 'idle trade.' He pleads a higher 'calling,' that of his professional duties, as sufficient excuse. Moreover, he offers the same excuse for his 'progress in the art of versification' being less marked than his readers ...
— Crabbe, (George) - English Men of Letters Series • Alfred Ainger

... commerce, which never could be securely enjoyed without the protection of naval power. I offer, sir, abundant proof for the satisfaction of the liberal mind of that gentleman, that patronage was not formerly a motive in voting an increase in the navy, when I give now the same vote, when surely I and my friends have nothing to hope, and for myself, I thank God, nothing to wish from the patronage it ...
— The World's Best Orations, Vol. 1 (of 10) • Various

... most men wouldn't say so. There are, I'll be bound, forty men within a mile of this house who would give their ears to have ...
— Jack Harkaway and his son's Escape From the Brigand's of Greece • Bracebridge Hemyng

... he had explored from Fort Bridger, by way of the south end of Salt Lake. It emphasized the statement that this new route was nearly two hundred miles shorter than the old one by way of Fort Hall and the headwaters of Ogden's River, and that he himself would remain at Fort Bridger to give further information, and to conduct the emigrants ...
— The Expedition of the Donner Party and its Tragic Fate • Eliza Poor Donner Houghton

... worked hard for him. He was intensely particular; and I was more nervous over these lessons than I ever felt riding over high timber. My father was so delighted at what Coquelin said to him about me and my acting that he bought a fine early copy of Moliere's plays which he made me give him. I enclose ...
— Margot Asquith, An Autobiography: Volumes I & II • Margot Asquith

... reasons why the endeavor should be made to obtain a broad basis of clear information on the subject. In the first place, the normal phenomena give the key to the abnormal phenomena, and the majority of sexual perversions, including even those that are most repulsive, are but exaggerations of instincts and emotions that are germinal in normal human beings. In the second place, we cannot even know what is normal until we are acquainted ...
— Studies in the Psychology of Sex, Volume 3 (of 6) • Havelock Ellis

... their lessons, stopping only to lift timid glances to his friendly face, as if they would gladly pour out their little hearts to him, he was filled with a great pity and a sharp regret that he could not take the wee things away with him, and give them each the shelter of as happy a home as that in which his own Phemie bloomed ...
— Harper's Young People, January 13, 1880 - An Illustrated Weekly • Various

... come a day When they'll give you all your pay, And treat you as a Christian ought to do; So, until that day comes round, Heaven keep you safe and sound, And, Thomas, here's ...
— Barrack-Room Ballads • Rudyard Kipling

... are getting quite a head for housekeeping. We'll give mother such a good supper, and it will do her a ...
— Wild Kitty • L. T. Meade

... have,—Span., margarita; Ital., margarita and maugherita; Fr., marguerite, but used only in the proverb, "Il ne faut pas jeter les marguerites devant les pourceaux." Johnson, Webster, and Halliwell give margarite as an English word. Probably all ...
— Notes and Queries, No. 179. Saturday, April 2, 1853. • Various

... but nearer to the iron gate, is a recessed tomb to a knight in mixed armour of mail and plate, and by his side his lady, with kirtle, mantle, and flowing hair. Both wear SS collars, and this helps to give the age of the monument, by narrowing the date down to a year not earlier than 1399. The SS collars also tend to disprove that the monument is to Humphrey de Bohun, Earl of Hereford, and his countess, seeing that he died in 1361. On the knight's belt is a badge, very much worn down, ...
— Bell's Cathedrals: The Cathedral Church of Gloucester [2nd ed.] • H. J. L. J. Masse

... and purifications thou bringest the offerings, And dost filially present them, In spring, summer, autumn, and winter, To the dukes and former kings[1]; And they say, 'We give to thee myriads ...
— The Shih King • James Legge

... each of the two storeys that runs from one end of the house to the other; on the south side whereof are little cells, wherein the patients have their lodgings, and on the north the windows that give light to the galleries, which are divided in the middle by a handsome iron gate, to keep ...
— London in 1731 • Don Manoel Gonzales

... were not concerning Steve. It was one of those moments of solitude in which he could give run to the thoughts that most nearly concerned him. His eyes had parted from the shadowy smile which they usually wore before the eyes of others. Just now they were scarcely happy, and the drawn brows suggested a lurking trouble that disturbed him. He was thinking of Marcel. Ever since ...
— The Heart of Unaga • Ridgwell Cullum

... demands, grace bestows. Law comes saying 'Do this,' and our consciences respond to the imperativeness of the obligation. But grace comes and says, 'I will help thee to do it.' Law is God requiring; grace is God bestowing. 'Give what Thou commandest, and then command what ...
— Expositions of Holy Scripture - St. John Chapters I to XIV • Alexander Maclaren

... poorest layer is that of what we call our waking life, and the better layers are at our service only in our dreams—that when a man is asleep or mad he can solve problems, compose music, create pictures, to which, when awake and in his sober senses, and in a condition to profit by his work, and give profit from it, ...
— The Unpopular Review, Volume II Number 3 • Various

... you must give it me. I must finish my collar, or I shall not duly honour your sister in my first call. We can talk as well working ...
— Deerbrook • Harriet Martineau

... stands in artistic bronze, is twice as great as the real Grattan thundering in the Senate. I will therefore ask the reader, remembering the large manner of the antique literature from which our tale is drawn, to forget for a while that there is such a thing as scientific history, to give his imagination a holiday, and follow with kindly interest the singular story of the boyhood of Cuculain, "battle-prop of the valour and torch of the chivalry of ...
— The Coming of Cuculain • Standish O'Grady

... same varying only a little in the proportions of sugar, salt and salt peter. If you have a formula that you have tried for years and have found it to be satisfactory there is no reason you should attempt a new one. But for those who want to try a different formula or recipe I will give you this reliable one that is widely used and indorsed by several ...
— Every Step in Canning • Grace Viall Gray

... and pleasant hours, By wild wood, hill, and grove, And find a heaven in solitude, With one we deeply love; To know the wealth of happiness, That each to each can give, And feel no power can sever us— Ah! this ...
— The Modern Scottish Minstrel, Volumes I-VI. - The Songs of Scotland of the Past Half Century • Various

... slowly turned a turkey purple, but his voice remained calm and even. "I think you stated the proposition fairly, general. You will get from us the same amount of consideration that you give us." ...
— Take the Reason Prisoner • John Joseph McGuire

... hand he dipped, And purifying water sipped: "Each citizen," he cried, "give ear, Attend, each counsellor and peer. My mother planned, by me untaught, To win the sway I never sought: Ne'er Raghu's son could I despise, In duty's lore supremely wise. Now if obedience to our sire This dwelling ...
— The Ramayana • VALMIKI

... are therefore the natural educators of their children. When they commit them to the care of others for instruction it is their right to have them educated as they wish. As by the supreme and sacred right of conscience man is free to give to his life its moral direction, so also does the same principle apply to the education of a child for whose conscience, as for whose life, the parent is responsible. The moral right of the parent, which is one ...
— Catholic Problems in Western Canada • George Thomas Daly

... at the clock, his eye had to traverse the region of the sofa. On the sofa were one parasol and two gloves. Astonishing, singular, disconcerting, how those articles—which, after all, bore no kind of resemblance to any style of furniture or hangings—seemed, nevertheless, to refurnish the room, to give the room an air of being thickly inhabited ...
— Helen with the High Hand (2nd ed.) • Arnold Bennett

... v. 1. There is a double meaning in the original, and the translator can give but half of it. Mentula, synonymous with penis, is a nickname applied by Catullus to Mamurra, of whom he says (cxv.) that he is not a man, but a great thundering mentula. Maherault has happily rendered the ...
— The Carmina of Caius Valerius Catullus • Caius Valerius Catullus

... "Please to give him this; and if he wishes to see me, I shall be at Captain Patterdale's house for an hour or two," continued Donald; and without giving the housekeeper time to reply, he hastened off, confident there would be a storm as soon as the eccentric ...
— The Yacht Club - or The Young Boat-Builder • Oliver Optic

... people were unhappy, not because they had not, so to speak, nourishing food, but because their stomachs had been spoiled, and because their appetites demanded not nourishing but irritating viands; and I did not perceive that, in order to help them, it was not necessary to give them food, but that it was necessary to heal their disordered stomachs. Although I am anticipating by so doing, I will mention here, that, out of all these persons whom I noted down, I really did not help a single one, in spite of the fact that ...
— The Moscow Census - From "What to do?" • Lyof N. Tolstoi

... fact, Farland scarcely had expected that he would. He believed that Lerton had kept an appointment with Kate Gilbert, and then had continued to his office to take up the work of the day. Farland decided that he would give Lerton a chance to attend to the morning mail and pressing matters of business, before ...
— The Brand of Silence - A Detective Story • Harrington Strong

... secret of the portier's devotion? It is very simple: he gets FEES, AND NO SALARY. His fee is pretty closely regulated, too. If you stay a week, you give him five marks—a dollar and a quarter, or about eighteen cents a day. If you stay a month, you reduce this average somewhat. If you stay two or three months or longer, you cut it down half, or even more than half. If you stay only one day, you give the portier ...
— Innocents abroad • Mark Twain

... began to stir. He put out one foot, and gradually moved forward. He made another step. He was going away. He had almost reached the door, when Miss Eunice articulated, in a confused whisper, "My—my glove; I wish you would give me my glove." ...
— Stories by American Authors, Volume 6 • Various

... B Fig. 1.) These are among the most difficult of all the mound-builders' remains to give an opinion upon. They are chiefly made of a soft stone something like the pipestone used by the present Indians which approaches soapstone. The hollow tubes (see figure B.) vary from three to six inches in length, and are about ...
— The Mound Builders • George Bryce

... for a last look, would she be one? What optimism remained to him presented a sketch of Julia, in black, borne from the room in the arms of girl friends who tried in vain to hush her; but he was unable to give this more hopeful fragment an air of great reality. Much more probably, when word came to her that he had smoked himself to death, she would be a bride, dancing at Niagara Falls with her bald old husband—and she would only laugh and pause to toss a faded rose ...
— Gentle Julia • Booth Tarkington

... promise where, in all these things, Shocks of strength with strength, and jar of hurtling kings? Who of all men, who will show us any good? Shall these lightnings of blind battles give men light? Where is freedom? who will bring us in her sight, That have hardly seen her footprint ...
— Two Nations • Algernon Charles Swinburne

... somehow "Come with me, And we will wander by the purple sea;" I crooned it, and—God help me!—felt no dread. O Purple Sea, beyond the stress of storms, Where never ripple breaks upon the shore Of Death's pale Isles of Twilight as they dream, Give back, give back, O Sea of Nevermore, The frailest of the unsubstantial forms That leave the shores that ...
— The Home Book of Verse, Vol. 1 (of 4) • Various

... Yet give me, give me, ere I go, One little lock of those so blest, That lend your cheek a warmer glow, And on your white neck love ...
— Poems • Samuel Rogers

... skill as an artist, but thought his head would be an admirable one to paint. Such a rich complexion, such fine turns in his hair! Such eyes! To see real blue eyes was so rare now-a-days! And the Colonel too, if the Colonel would but give him a few sittings, the grey uniform of the Bengal Cavalry, the silver lace, the little bit of red ribbon just to warm up the picture! It was seldom, Mr. Smee declared, that an artist could get such ...
— Boys and girls from Thackeray • Kate Dickinson Sweetser

... for her, by Jove! She's making her entry. And she takes part in the reconciliation, the devil she does! What? You don't see her? She's squeezing all three of 'em to her heart—my cousin Fauchery, my lady cousin and her husband, and she's calling 'em her dear kitties. Oh, those family scenes give me a turn!" ...
— Nana, The Miller's Daughter, Captain Burle, Death of Olivier Becaille • Emile Zola

... the organ, and another song followed from the same young lady, during which operation Green sent for the manager, and, after a little beating about the bush, proposed singing a song or two, if he would give him lottery-tickets gratis. He asked three shilling-tickets for each song, and finally closed for five tickets for two songs, on the understanding that he was to be announced as a distinguished amateur, who had come forward ...
— Jorrocks' Jaunts and Jollities • Robert Smith Surtees

... letter. Give my best love to papa and sister; and kiss yourself on your dear little cheek if you can, ...
— The Little Nightcap Letters. • Frances Elizabeth Barrow

... feelings of the Oriental have been composed by combinations of experiences, ancestral and individual, which have had no really precise correspondence in Western life, and which we can therefore not fully know. For converse reasons, the. Japanese cannot, even though they would, give Europeans ...
— Kokoro - Japanese Inner Life Hints • Lafcadio Hearn

... my masters," continued this young enthusiast, "because they fling all rules aside, and cry out as they choose. It is their very heart's blood and the lusty wine of life that they give you, not just a scrap of 'rosemary for remembrance' and a soothing herb-tea made from the flowers of fancy they have culled from those much travestied, abominable ...
— Mae Madden • Mary Murdoch Mason

... us. If they will but do that, we may give them the slip, and back again to the town, and there try our luck; for I cannot find it in my heart to leave the place without having ...
— Westward Ho! • Charles Kingsley

... handbook of magic. They would, however, be constantly reexamined and sifted under the guidance of wider experience and a better acquaintance with natural causes, and this process, carried on by experts, would give rise to the science of magic as we ...
— Introduction to the History of Religions - Handbooks on the History of Religions, Volume IV • Crawford Howell Toy

... the idea of leaving her at one of the far apart oasis towns where the caravan took supplies. But the more she turned over the thought in her unenlightened mind, the more impossible it seemed to her that Stanton would give her up. Besides, he was very brave, even braver than the great chiefs of her own race, for they feared unseen things and omens, whereas he laughed at their superstition. She used every art of the professional ...
— A Soldier of the Legion • C. N. Williamson

... flows from increased trade, and it produces a still further increase of trade. The views, and desires, and habits of mankind, are like their knowledge, they are and must be progressive: and if accompanied, as they generally are, by increased means, they must give birth to increased industry and skill, and their necessary ...
— Robert Kerr's General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Volume 18 • William Stevenson



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