Dictonary.netDictonary.net
Synonyms, antonyms, pronunciation

  Home
English Dictionary      examples: 'day', 'get rid of', 'New York Bay'




Break   Listen
verb
Break  v. i.  (past broke, obs. brake; past part. broken, obs. broke; pres. part. breaking)  
1.
To come apart or divide into two or more pieces, usually with suddenness and violence; to part; to burst asunder.
2.
To open spontaneously, or by pressure from within, as a bubble, a tumor, a seed vessel, a bag. "Else the bottle break, and the wine runneth out."
3.
To burst forth; to make its way; to come to view; to appear; to dawn. "The day begins to break, and night is fled." "And from the turf a fountain broke, and gurgled at our feet."
4.
To burst forth violently, as a storm. " The clouds are still above; and, while I speak, A second deluge o'er our head may break."
5.
To open up; to be scattered; to be dissipated; as, the clouds are breaking. "At length the darkness begins to break."
6.
To become weakened in constitution or faculties; to lose health or strength. "See how the dean begins to break; Poor gentleman! he droops apace."
7.
To be crushed, or overwhelmed with sorrow or grief; as, my heart is breaking.
8.
To fall in business; to become bankrupt. "He that puts all upon adventures doth oftentimes break, and come to poverty."
9.
To make an abrupt or sudden change; to change the gait; as, to break into a run or gallop.
10.
To fail in musical quality; as, a singer's voice breaks when it is strained beyond its compass and a tone or note is not completed, but degenerates into an unmusical sound instead. Also, to change in tone, as a boy's voice at puberty.
11.
To fall out; to terminate friendship. "To break upon the score of danger or expense is to be mean and narrow-spirited." Note: With prepositions or adverbs: -
To break away, to disengage one's self abruptly; to come or go away against resistance. "Fear me not, man; I will not break away."
To break down.
(a)
To come down by breaking; as, the coach broke down.
(b)
To fail in any undertaking; to halt before successful completion; as, the negotiations broke down due to irreconcilable demands.
(c)
To cease functioning or to malfunction; as, the car broke down in the middle of the highway. "He had broken down almost at the outset."
To break forth, to issue; to come out suddenly, as sound, light, etc. "Then shall thy light break forth as the morning." Note: often with into in expressing or giving vent to one's feelings. "Break forth into singing, ye mountains."
To break from, to go away from abruptly. "This radiant from the circling crowd he broke."
To break into, to enter by breaking; as, to break into a house.
To break in upon, to enter or approach violently or unexpectedly. "This, this is he; softly awhile; let us not break in upon him."
To break loose.
(a)
To extricate one's self forcibly. "Who would not, finding way, break loose from hell?"
(b)
To cast off restraint, as of morals or propriety.
To break off.
(a)
To become separated by rupture, or with suddenness and violence.
(b)
To desist or cease suddenly. "Nay, forward, old man; do not break off so."
To break off from, to desist from; to abandon, as a habit.
To break out.
(a)
To burst forth; to escape from restraint; to appear suddenly, as a fire or an epidemic. "For in the wilderness shall waters break out, and stream in the desert."
(b)
To show itself in cutaneous eruptions; said of a disease.
(c)
To have a rash or eruption on the akin; said of a patient.
To break over, to overflow; to go beyond limits.
To break up.
(a)
To become separated into parts or fragments; as, the ice break up in the rivers; the wreck will break up in the next storm.
(b)
To disperse. "The company breaks up."
To break upon, to discover itself suddenly to; to dawn upon.
To break with.
(a)
To fall out; to sever one's relations with; to part friendship. "It can not be the Volsces dare break with us." "If she did not intend to marry Clive, she should have broken with him altogether."
(b)
To come to an explanation; to enter into conference; to speak. (Obs.) "I will break with her and with her father."






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








Advanced search
     Find words:
Starting with
Ending with
Containing
Matching a pattern  

Synonyms
Antonyms
Quotes
Words linked to  

only single words



Share |





"Break" Quotes from Famous Books



... spinning of the wool, it was no light work to do. For her mother was not pleased that she had undertaken it without her knowledge and consent, and fretted, and cast difficulties in the way, till Shenac, more harassed and unhappy than she had ever been before, offered to break the bargain and send back the wool. Her mother did not insist on this, however, and Shenac span on in the midst of her murmurings. Then Hamish took the mother away to visit her sister in the next township, and during their absence Shenac kept little Flora away from the school to do such ...
— Shenac's Work at Home • Margaret Murray Robertson

... she was so tender and good that Pen was terrified lest his mother should know of his sins. "I can't bear to break it to her," he said to the tutor in an agony of grief. "O! sir, I've been a villain to her"—and he repented, and he wished he had the time to come over again, and he asked himself, "Why, why did his uncle insist upon the necessity of living with great people, and ...
— The History of Pendennis • William Makepeace Thackeray

... waters o' the very bay that his eyes beheld rolling, and his ears heard roaring—all the while that there was a God in heaven! Naebody could speak to him—although they all beseeched their Maker to have compassion upon him, and not to let his heart break and his reason fail. 'The stakes! the stakes! O Jesus! point out to me, with thy own scarred hand, the place where my wife and daughter are bound to the stakes—and I may yet bear them up out of the sand, and bring the bodies ashore—to be restored to life! O brethren, ...
— Recreations of Christopher North, Volume 2 • John Wilson

... Winny had collected and put away in order, and hidden out of his sight as best she could. Seeing, she too, the tale they told, she had hung a sheet in front of them and locked the door on them and laid the key aside, to break in some degree the shock of them. For they were things that had been good enough for him, but not good enough for Violet's lover. She had gone to him in all her bravery, leaving them behind, ...
— The Combined Maze • May Sinclair

... hold your horses!" cautioned Harry Squires. "Don't forget the body's alive and kic—" and stopping short, in the hope that his break might escape the school-teacher's attention, he ...
— The Daughter of Anderson Crow • George Barr McCutcheon

... upon the microtome was from a foetus between three and four months old. In this the secondary laminar ridges were clearly indicated, and the active layer of the rete Malpighii could be traced without a break from one ingrowing epithelial process to the next, and around this, following all the irregularities of its outline, and covering the branches of the nascent laminae. The laminae mostly show this branching as if a number of different ...
— Diseases of the Horse's Foot • Harry Caulton Reeks

... verily he hath cured thy daughter while standing behind the curtain and without going in to her." Quoth the King, "Look well to it, is this news true?" Answered the eunuch, "O my lord, rise and come and see for thyself how she hath found strength to break the iron chains and is come forth to the Astrologer, kissing and embracing him." Thereupon the King arose and went in to his daughter who, when she saw him, stood up in haste and covered her head,[FN303] and recited these ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 3 • Richard F. Burton

... you've been very clever. That yellow jug was horrid ugly, and being shabby at the spout and the handle, I often wished it would get itself broken instead of the pretty new ones. I'm quite glad you've broken it; I think you were very clever to break that one." ...
— Littlebourne Lock • F. Bayford Harrison

... took over the Woolson property at a price considerably lower than originally paid for it. In 1919, the Woolson Spice Co. brought suit against the Sielcken estate, alleging a loss of $932,000 on valorization coffee sold to it by Sielcken just after the federal government began its suit in 1912 to break up the valorization pool in the United States. The Woolson Spice Co. paid the "market price", as did the rest of the buyers of valorization coffee; but it was charged that Sielcken, as managing partner of Crossman & Sielcken, sold the coffee to the Woolson Spice Co., of which he was president, ...
— All About Coffee • William H. Ukers

... ovary (ov.), in which the ova (eggs) are formed. Figure 3 gives an enlarged and still more diagrammatic rendering of the ovary. There is a supporting ground mass, or stroma, into which numerous bloodvessels and nerves enter and break up. The ova appear first as small cells in the external substance of the ovary (as at 1), and move inward (2 and 3), surrounded by a number of sister cells, which afford them nourishment. At (4) an ovum with its surrounding ...
— Text Book of Biology, Part 1: Vertebrata • H. G. Wells

... I thought, something is going to happen in my uneventful life—something to break the monotony of existence. Of course, he must have inquired my name—he could get that from any of the cathedral vergers—and, as he said, he had observed whereabouts in the close I lived. What is he coming to see me for? I wondered. I spent the rest of the afternoon in making the wildest surmises. ...
— The Lock And Key Library - Classic Mystery And Detective Stories, Modern English • Various

... being informed of the despair into which I had plunged the man whom she loves to see, she came to beg me to allow her to prevent a departure which would break her heart; to meet this lover to-night under my name, in the little street on which my room looks, where counterfeiting my voice, she may utter certain tender feelings, and thereby tempt him to stay; in short, cleverly to secure for ...
— The School for Husbands • Moliere

... the mother nor child did he make any reply; but wept on and sobbed as if his heart would break. ...
— Phelim O'toole's Courtship and Other Stories • William Carleton

... the first, Hugh failed—naturally perhaps in his position—to understand the regard for Iris, and the fear of offending her, by which her jealous husband was restrained. Lord Harry was attempting (awkwardly indeed!) to break off the relations between his wife and her friend, by means which might keep the true state of his feelings concealed from both of them. Ignorant of this claim on his forbearance, it was Mountjoy's impression that he was being trifled with. ...
— Blind Love • Wilkie Collins

... ready? Do I look all right? Wilbur, give the motorman two bells. Look out, there! There goes Er Lawshe with a plaster cast of Genee under his arm. Do you want to make him drop it and break ...
— The Sorrows of a Show Girl • Kenneth McGaffey

... contrast makes the Chinese porcelain-painter break the blue borders of his plates with small cartouche-like forms inclosing the light ground, varied with a spray or device of some light kind; or the diagonal, closely-filled field of his woven silk by broad discs or cartouches of another ...
— Line and Form (1900) • Walter Crane

... crush him in its fall;— Forth sallied he, though old, From town and roof-protected hall, And took his lodgings, wet or dry, Abroad, beneath the open sky. An eagle, bearing through the air A tortoise for her household fare, Which first she wish'd to break, The creature dropp'd, by sad mistake, Plump on the poet's forehead bare, As if it were a naked rock— To Aeschylus a ...
— The Fables of La Fontaine - A New Edition, With Notes • Jean de La Fontaine

... well as the bar and spirit store of the tavern, were in flames. While the Bostonians endeavoured to steal what they could, and the landlord was beating his negroes, the only parties upon whom he could vent his fury, our companions succeeded in recovering their horses, and at break of day, without any loss but the gold watch of the doctor, which had probably been stolen from him during his sleep, we started for the last day's journey which we had to ...
— Travels and Adventures of Monsieur Violet • Captain Marryat

... wailed, "those idiots, those scoundrels, lost my baggage at Vouziers. If I ever catch them I will break every bone in their body! And now I haven't a thing, not a handkerchief, not a pair of socks! Upon my word, it is ...
— The Downfall • Emile Zola

... of a strong character and break their fetters, they become a mark for the society which has not succeeded in reducing them to commonplace, to point at with solemn warning, as 'wild,' 'erratic,' and the like; much as if one should complain of the Niagara ...
— The Continental Monthly, Vol III, Issue VI, June, 1863 - Devoted to Literature and National Policy • Various

... perhaps no matter for surprise that one of his less learned fellows should break out with more force ...
— Pastoral Poetry and Pastoral Drama - A Literary Inquiry, with Special Reference to the Pre-Restoration - Stage in England • Walter W. Greg

... even recently built wire fences or man himself, and like the cat despises water except for drinking purposes. So when this band of antelope decided to adjourn their siesta from the warm, sunny slope of a sand dune, they made an effort and did break the cordon, but ...
— Cattle Brands - A Collection of Western Camp-fire Stories • Andy Adams

... of Port Louis is of singular formation. It is entered by a narrow passage or break in the coral reef surrounding the island, leading into a large basin, the central portion only of which has sufficient water for shipping. The bottom is mud, which, they say, is fast accumulating, especially ...
— Narrative Of The Voyage Of H.M.S. Rattlesnake, Commanded By The Late Captain Owen Stanley, R.N., F.R.S. Etc. During The Years 1846-1850. Including Discoveries And Surveys In New Guinea, The Louisiade • John MacGillivray

... fall that it never froze in winter; the thing would be to build a small stone reservoir here, with openings at the sides for the overflow in autumn and spring. Oh, but they should have their water-supply at Ovrebo! As for the masonry work, we could break out our stone on the site itself; there was layer on layer of ...
— Wanderers • Knut Hamsun

... first is in break, but not in tear. My second is in rabbit, also in hare. My third is in pay, but not in trust. My fourth is in earth, but not in dust. My fifth is in spring, but not in fall. My sixth is in great, but not in small. My whole is ...
— Harper's Young People, February 17, 1880 - An Illustrated Weekly • Various

... librarian came from the closet. I threw myself on a couch. Mr. Raven drew a chair to my side and sat down. For a minute or two neither spoke. I was the first to break ...
— Lilith • George MacDonald

... of a point I thought I recognized on the chart before I lost sight of the coast. There's a long reef outshore of it, with a break near the point. If we can get through, we ...
— Brandon of the Engineers • Harold Bindloss

... that part of the shore where it rose a perpendicular wall of rock towering a hundred feet above the sea, and offered no place of refuge. So they hurried on as best they could in the hope of rounding the walls and making land before the inevitable break came. ...
— Ungava Bob - A Winter's Tale • Dillon Wallace

... fresh perfection. For the circumstance that that was not what occurred with respect to my own relation to Dimitri, I was indebted to his stubborn, punctilious, and more critical than impulsive attachment to myself—a tie which I felt ashamed to break. Moreover, our strange vow of frankness bound us together. We were afraid that, if we parted, we should leave in one another's power all the incriminatory moral secrets of which we had made mutual confession. At the same ...
— Youth • Leo Tolstoy

... salvation; so that, hence, the righteousness there corresponds with the water here. The subsequent "eat" furnishes the foundation for the fact, that the need of and desire for salvation, is designated by hunger also,—"Come ye, buy and eat." [Hebrew: wbr] "to break," is used of the appeasing of thirst (comp. Ps. civ. 11), and hunger (comp. Gen. xlii. 19); and corn is called [Hebrew: wbr] for this reason that it breaks the hunger. The verb never means "to buy" in general, but only such a buying as affords the means of ...
— Christology of the Old Testament: And a Commentary on the Messianic Predictions. Vol. 2 • Ernst Hengstenberg

... accomplish. The latter had other work far more laborious to perform for the house. The sills, posts, beams, rafters, &c., which they cut in the mountains, six to ten miles distant, they drew down by hand. The posts and beams required the strength of forty to sixty men each. Such a company, starting at break of day, with ropes in hand, and walking two or three hours through the fern and underbrush loaded with the cold dew, made fast to their timber, and, addressing themselves to their sober toil for the rest of the day, dragged it ...
— Daughters of the Cross: or Woman's Mission • Daniel C. Eddy

... week of the threshing at the Hanley Ranch was well on its way, and nothing had occurred to break the routine of hard work in the daytime and nights spent in a tent, in an atmosphere laden with tobacco smoke and ...
— Injun and Whitey to the Rescue • William S. Hart

... thick foliage covered the shaded sward with a delicate network of gold. Sometimes where the woods opened they came out into the pure sunlight, but only to pass into thick glades beyond, where a single ray, here and there, was all that could break its way through the vast leafy covering. It would have been beautiful, these sudden transitions from light to shade, but with the feeling of impending danger, and of a horror ever lurking in these shadows, the mind ...
— The Refugees • Arthur Conan Doyle

... would be serious—and then there was a grandeur about him very striking. At such times, bursts of passionate feeling would break from him that seemed like volcanic eruptions. They appeared to come from a deep and intense tenderness of heart. These were momentary—the lightning's flash illuminating the gloom and darkness of its parent cloud. ...
— The Memories of Fifty Years • William H. Sparks

... to be held fall 2001); prime minister nominated by the president and approved by Parliament election results: Lennart MERI elected president by an electoral assembly after Parliament was unable to break a deadlock between MERI and RUUTEL; percent of electoral assembly vote—Lennart MERI ...
— The 1999 CIA Factbook • United States. Central Intelligence Agency.

... the flash of intuition came to Peter, if that hole were not stopped up instantly, the force of the flow through it would rapidly increase from the pounding of that mighty sea behind it. In a night the flood would break through the dyke and perhaps destroy all the ...
— Ten Boys from History • Kate Dickinson Sweetser

... break in their habitual politeness was averted by the arrival of a third old lady, the Marchesa Valdeste. As her husband was the receiver of the "Gran Collare de l'Anunziata," a distinction that gave him the rank of cousin to the king, the duchess ...
— The Title Market • Emily Post

... the kingdom of the storm. To you, declare I must, Dame Nature seems unjust.' Then modestly replied the reed: 'Your pity, sir, is kind indeed, But wholly needless for my sake. The wildest wind that ever blew Is safe to me compared with you. I bend, indeed, but never break. Thus far, I own, the hurricane Has beat your sturdy back in vain; But wait the end.' Just at the word, The tempest's hollow voice was heard. The North sent forth her fiercest child, Dark, jagged, pitiless, and wild. The oak, erect, endured the blow; The reed bow'd gracefully ...
— The Fables of La Fontaine - A New Edition, With Notes • Jean de La Fontaine

... break in for if you didn't mean to steal? It is all off between you and Jule, for I saw your letter. I shall have you arrested to-morrow for burglary. And I think you ought to be searched. Mr. Humphreys, won't you ...
— The End Of The World - A Love Story • Edward Eggleston

... of making the king absolute master the Parliament passed an Act in Restraint of Appeals, the first constitutional break with Rome. {292} The theory of the government was set forth ...
— The Age of the Reformation • Preserved Smith

... brain is relieved, recreated, emptied; I go no longer heavily, as one that mourneth; and with gleeful face can I assure you that your author's mind is once again as light as his heart: but when crowding fancies come thick upon it, they bow it, and break it, and weary it, as clouds of pigeons settling gregariously on a trans-Atlantic forest; and when those thronging thoughts are comfortably fixed on paper, one feels, as an apple-tree may be supposed to feel, all the difference ...
— The Complete Prose Works of Martin Farquhar Tupper • Martin Farquhar Tupper

... Junior, climbing fences and trees, and riding horses bareback in the home lot. It seemed as though Phil, as they called her, "held in" just as long as she could, trying to put on the airs of grown-ups, and then just had to break out. ...
— Six Little Bunkers at Mammy June's • Laura Lee Hope

... will not leave the destiny of the loyal millions the islands to the disloyal thousands who are in rebellion against the United States. Order under civil institutions will come as soon as those who now break the peace shall keep it. Force will not be needed or used when those who make war against us shall make it no more. May it end without further bloodshed, and there be ushered in the reign of peace to be made permanent by a government of ...
— U.S. Presidential Inaugural Addresses • Various

... Kings ken that they had a lith in their neck' (Lord Auchinleck), v. 382, n. 2; 'On a thirtieth of January every King in Europe would rise with a crick in his neck' (Quin), v. 382, n. 2; 'If you have so many things that will break, you had better break your neck at once, and there's an ...
— Life of Johnson, Volume 6 (of 6) • James Boswell

... have been made by the Spaniards to recapture Victoria de las Tunas, and to break the power of the insurgents in Santiago de Cuba. The Cubans have, however, gained victory after victory, and have at last driven the Spaniards over the trocha, and utterly destroyed the town of Las Tunas. They were not ...
— The Great Round World and What Is Going On In It, Vol. 1, No. 48, October 7, 1897 - A Weekly Magazine for Boys and Girls • Various

... late the night they reached home to see Douglas but the next morning he hurried through his breakfast, which was eaten by candle-light, and at break of day was off for Kenemish, where Douglas Campbell lived. He found the old man at home, and, with some fear of refusal, but still bravely, for he knew the kind-hearted old trapper would grant the request if he thought it ...
— Ungava Bob - A Winter's Tale • Dillon Wallace

... extensive damage to the country thereabout. This letter he asserted to have been put into his hands by the Huns themselves who had come before him. So then Chosroes, with these charges against the Romans, was purposing to break off the treaty. But as to whether he was speaking the truth in these matters, I am not able ...
— History of the Wars, Books I and II (of 8) - The Persian War • Procopius

... fierce war, shall break their forces, Nerves of tory men shall fail, Seeing HOWE with alter'd courses, Bending to ...
— The Battle of Bunkers-Hill • Hugh Henry Brackenridge

... not come in twenty-four hours not one man will escape alive. Even Wetzel could not break through that line of Indians. But if we can hold the Indians off a day longer they will get tired and discouraged. Girty will not be able to hold them much longer. The British don't count. It's not their kind of war. They can't shoot, ...
— Betty Zane • Zane Grey

... unquestionably supplied the facts concealed in one of the longest of these unaccountable blanks. This was not a mere guess on his part, but a demonstrable certainty. On a fac-simile of the Codex Boturini he bade me observe attentively the pictures which preceded and which followed the break in question; and then he showed me that these same pictures were the beginning and the ending of my own codex—obviously put there so that this secret record might be inserted accurately into the public record of the ...
— The Aztec Treasure-House • Thomas Allibone Janvier

... heaven, what does it mean?" cried Mr. Forster. "You know you have not attempted to steal a watch. Pardon me, but how dare you plead guilty? You will cover yourself with disgrace and infamy. You will break your mother's heart. You will be ...
— The Coquette's Victim • Charlotte M. Braeme

... congregated into societies, according to their propinquity to each other, and taught to meet every first day of the week, in honor and commemoration of the resurrection of Jesus, and to break the loaf, which commemorates the death of the Son of God, to read and hear the living oracles, to teach and admonish one another, to unite in all prayer and praise, to contribute to the necessities of saints, and to perfect holiness in ...
— The Book of Religions • John Hayward

... privately, if his information leads to the hanging of this gang. Say, boy, we ain't goin' to split hairs or play any low games on this lay out. I'm a rich man, an' ten thousand dollars ain't a circumstance so we break up this gang. If we only get one of 'em or part of 'em, the man who shows me their hiding-place, and leads me to it, that man—or his wife—gets my ten thousand dollars. You can have it in writing. But my word goes any ...
— The Forfeit • Ridgwell Cullum

... pale. It was in some respects a quarrel of races. For, French and English at the tables had got up and were eyeing each other. As to the immediate outcome of the quarrel, there could be no doubt. The English and Americans could break the others to pieces; but neither wished that. The landlord decided ...
— The Judgment House • Gilbert Parker

... holding on step by step, among the numerous impediments which lay in the way. Such was the creaking noise of the bulkheads or partitions, the dashing of the water, and the whistling noise of the winds, that it was hardly possible to break in upon such a confusion of sounds. In one or two instances, anxious and repeated inquiries were made by the artificers as to the state of things upon deck, to which the captain made the usual answer, that it could not blow long in this way, and that we must ...
— The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition Vol. 16 (of 25) • Robert Louis Stevenson

... or Paterson will be wiped off the map. If the strike is not won Paterson will be a howling wilderness and a graveyard industrially, because the workers will not stay there. We have had too long and bitter a fight to lay down what we have gained so far. Heaven might fall and hell might break loose, but the strike is going ...
— The Red Conspiracy • Joseph J. Mereto

... evening? Will God "revive us and raise us up" in the third day to the apostolic plane? The answer is, "His going forth is prepared as the morning." "Then shall thy light break forth as the morning, and thine health shall spring forth speedily: and thy righteousness shall go before thee; the glory of the Lord shall be ...
— The Gospel Day • Charles Ebert Orr

... his revenues of one hundred and twenty thousand a year in France. But he had his fears. "Remembering that the king, the queen, and monsieur (the Duke of Anjou), to confirm the last peace, did him the honor to give him their word, placing their own hands in his, and that those who induced them to break it were those very persons with whom he and his associates now had to conclude the proposed peace," he said, "his hair stood upon end with fear." All that the Protestants wanted was security. They would be glad to transfer the war elsewhere—a thing his brother the admiral had always desired; ...
— History of the Rise of the Huguenots - Volume 2 • Henry Baird

... recognise that there are primitive instincts of tremendous power, which, held in check by our dull and laborious, yet sexually-exciting, civilisation, break out at times in many individuals like a veritable monomania. In earlier civilisations this fact was frankly recognised, and such instincts were prevented from working mischief by the provision of means wherein they might expend themselves. Hence the widespread ...
— The Truth About Woman • C. Gasquoine Hartley

... anxiously expecting them. He feared something had happened—the press might break down, or the paper supply give out, Many things might occur when the man who ran the business was not there to keep ends straight. To say that the major was pleased was not half telling it—he was delighted. To think that they could get out a paper like ...
— Dorothy Dale • Margaret Penrose

... If he has not cultivated the field and has left it alone, he shall give to the owner of the field an average rent, and the field which he has neglected he shall break up with mattocks and plough it, and shall return it to ...
— Babylonian and Assyrian Laws, Contracts and Letters • C. H. W. Johns

... of September 1599, by the break of day wee were before the Maze, the sun Southwest, we arriued by the helpe of God's mercy and grace before ...
— The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries - Vol. II • Richard Hakluyt

... and suns of spring That warm with breath and wing The trembling sleep of earth, till half awake She laughs and blushes ere her slumber break, For all good gifts they bring Require one better thing, For all the loans of joy they lend us, borrow One sharper dole of sorrow, To sunder soon by half a world of sea Her son from England and my ...
— Studies in Song • Algernon Charles Swinburne

... him; and there was great commotion at Five Creeks. Jim was for driving hot-foot to Redford to warn Mr Pennycuick against disseminating the newspaper through the house too rashly. Alice and her mother each volunteered to go with him, so as to "break it" with feminine skilfulness to Mary, whose reason might be destroyed by too sudden a gorge of joy, like the stomach of a starved man by clumsy feeding. But while they anxiously discussed what ought to be done, Frances ...
— Sisters • Ada Cambridge

... think I will go down if you don't mind—when persons aren't used to 'em they're apt to be a little careless, and I wouldn't have it break and him losing his three o'clock bottle, for the world. You know how ...
— McClure's Magazine, Vol. XXXI, No. 3, July 1908. • Various

... a thorn, but was carefully disposed upon some horizontal twigs,—laid upon the shelf, so to speak. It was as warm as in life, and its plumage was unruffled. On examining it I found a large bruise or break in the skin on the back of the neck, at the base of the skull. Here the bandit had no doubt gripped the bird with his strong beak. The shrike's bloodthirstiness was seen in the fact that he did not stop to devour his prey, but went in quest of more, ...
— Bird Stories from Burroughs - Sketches of Bird Life Taken from the Works of John Burroughs • John Burroughs

... of the field, giving no quarter, taking no prisoners, but performing such prodigies of valour as struck terror into the breasts of the foe. The French army (with the exception of three hundred horsemen, whose mission was to break the ranks of the bowmen) had been ordered, on account of the nature of the ground, all to fight on foot; and when the bold knight and his four chosen companions came charging in upon them, wheeling their ...
— In the Days of Chivalry • Evelyn Everett-Green

... far before we met two Galicians, on their way to cut the harvests of Castile. One of them shouted, "Cavalier, turn back: in a moment you will be amongst precipices, where your horses will break their necks, for we ourselves could scarcely climb them on foot." The other cried, "Cavalier, proceed, but be careful, and your horses, if sure-footed, will run no great danger: my comrade is a fool." A violent dispute instantly ensued between ...
— The Bible in Spain • George Borrow

... her husband, had now laid down her arms; she had made a longer fight of it, but in both cases the result had been the same. She promised that she would commence operations the next day, and do her utmost to break ...
— Caught In The Net • Emile Gaboriau

... us not be cast down under these and many other abuses we at present labor under: for the darkest is before the break of day. My brethren, let us remember what a dark day it was with our African brethren six years ago, in the French West Indies. Nothing but the snap of the whip was heard from morning to evening; hanging, ...
— A Social History of the American Negro • Benjamin Brawley

... yet, and that they will feel it later. Then they go about, especially if they are women, in a sort of hysterical strength; they speak calmly of what has happened; they help those beyond the immediate circle of their loss to bear up against it; these look to see them break suddenly under the stress of their bereavement, and wonder ...
— The Quality of Mercy • W. D. Howells

... disconcerting. It was at her house one day that I met Charles Strickland's wife. Miss Waterford was giving a tea-party, and her small room was more than usually full. Everyone seemed to be talking, and I, sitting in silence, felt awkward; but I was too shy to break into any of the groups that seemed absorbed in their own affairs. Miss Waterford was a good hostess, and seeing my ...
— The Moon and Sixpence • W. Somerset Maugham

... concentrated in the boy's life. It was a renewal of youth, hopes, ambitions, again possible in the person of this child, and for the second time a fierce, restless jealousy of his cousin began to stir in the inner depths of Aymer's being, as fire which may yet break into life beneath the grey, piled-up ...
— Christopher Hibbault, Roadmaker • Marguerite Bryant

... several glasses in my spare time, instead of doing it when the glass breaks. I mark a circle where I wish to cut the glass, and with a three-corner file I run it round this circle to a depth of the 16th of an inch, and break it off on the edge of the vice, bench, or other solid woodwork; of course this iron-wire gauge will perhaps only answer for this particular boiler, but in some stoke-hold the boilers are all alike with ...
— The Stoker's Catechism • W. J. Connor

... reputation, and the other a product of his proved mastery—is interesting to the critic. Whether it would be so to the general reader may be more doubtful. It is the longest of its author's novels; in fact its two volumes have separate sub-titles;[526] but there is no real break, either of time, place, or action, between them. It is a queer book, quite evidently of the novitiate, and suggesting now Paul de Kock (the properer but not quite proper Paul), now Daudet (to whom it is actually ...
— A History of the French Novel, Vol. 2 - To the Close of the 19th Century • George Saintsbury

... thinks that is my very worst drawback," she declared; and then chirping to Firefly, she was off at a break-neck pace, hat bobbing, brown braid flying, her eyes alight with the excitement ...
— Blue Bonnet's Ranch Party • C. E. Jacobs

... we try by a desperate effort to break the spell, I sprang forward, and struck at him, he put my hand by carelessly, and felled me bleeding to the ground. I recollect hardly anything more, till I found myself thrust into the street by sneering footmen, and heard them call after me "Chartist" and "Communist" ...
— Alton Locke, Tailor And Poet • Rev. Charles Kingsley et al

... principles which they do not now hold. They cannot be reformed, but are to be destroyed. Were the members of them to receive the truth, and jointly to cleave to it, these societies would thereby perish. Having become corrupt, they are under the curse entailed on those who break God's covenant, and not one privilege of the true Church do they enjoy. It is the duty of all connected with them to mourn for the sin of their breach of God's covenant, to give up all connection with these, to join themselves to the Church of Christ, and thereafter to act under ...
— The Ordinance of Covenanting • John Cunningham

... me a good half-hour's tramping to and fro, past the house and back again, eyeing it carefully each time as though I was trying to discover the best way to break into it, to screw my courage up to the point. There were two windows on each side of the door and two rows of five above, fourteen in all, and every window had its little curtains rigged up exactly alike to a hair's-breadth. ...
— Carette of Sark • John Oxenham

... see. Then lock the door and come and talk to me if you will. You will pity a poor blind fellow, I know. The darkness has come down upon me so quickly that I am not accustomed to it!' There was a break in his voice which moved the other. He lit a candle, feeling that the doing so would impress his patient, and went round the room; not with catlike movement this time—he wanted the other to hear him. When ...
— The Man • Bram Stoker

... are so much the happier, having less anxiety and worry. In addition to all this, we save our shillings in fees, and charges for over-weight, very considerably, and, when we are rid of the heavy trunks, last, not least, we break no backs. ...
— The Girl's Own Paper, Vol. VIII: No. 356, October 23, 1886. • Various

... Martin's mind that if they took Gerard away, his life was not worth a button; and that, if evil befell him, Margaret's heart would break. He cast his eyes wildly round like some savage beast seeking an escape, and in a twinkling formed a resolution terribly characteristic of those iron times and of a soldier driven to bay. He stepped to each door in turn, and imitating Dierich ...
— The Cloister and the Hearth • Charles Reade

... expediency, and that happened every day, but she would not have thought of taking counsel with him about any action which concerned herself. If society chanced to be in opposition to her, society must either give way or make the best of it, or break with her. But it was certainly within the bounds of social tradition and custom that she should ask such of her friends as she chose, to stay with ...
— Taquisara • F. Marion Crawford

... dark-green, now white, now striped—into even glistening rows. This work is clean, lively, and progresses rapidly. When a good party is gotten up, it is a pleasure to see how the watermelons fly from hand to hand, are caught with a circus-like quickness and success, and anew, and anew, without a break, fly, in order to fill up the dray. It is only difficult for the novices, that have not as yet gained the skill, have not caught on to that especial sense of the tempo. And it is not as difficult to catch a watermelon as to be ...
— Yama (The Pit) • Alexandra Kuprin

... been very much away from Littlebath since her aunt came back from Italy to make a home for her. She was with us; and with the Harcourts, in London; and, since the break-up there, she was at Hadley. It would not be right to Miss Gauntlet to ask her away ...
— The Bertrams • Anthony Trollope

... everybody's been abroad. I don't expect to like the way they live over there, but if other folks can stand it, I guess I can. It'll amuse me for a spell, maybe, and if it don't, I've got money enough to break away and do as I'm a ...
— Mother Carey's Chickens • Kate Douglas Wiggin

... borne in mind, in considering the furniture of the earlier part of the sixteenth century, that the religious persecutions of the time, together with the general break-up of the feudal system, had gradually brought about the disuse of the old custom of the master of the house taking his meals in the large hall or "houseplace," together with his retainers and dependants; and a smaller room leading from the great hall was fitted up with a dressoir ...
— Illustrated History of Furniture - From the Earliest to the Present Time • Frederick Litchfield

... of the village repeated themselves like the play of a clock-work toy. Always the same figures on the same painted stand, marked with the same pattern of slanting roads and three-cornered grass-plots. Half-way through prayers the Morfe bus would break loose from High Row with a clatter, and the brakes would grind on the hill. An hour after tea-time it would come back with a mournful tapping ...
— Mary Olivier: A Life • May Sinclair

... gooseberry in all seasons, who usually stands at the gateway of the livery-stables on very little legs under a very large waistcoat, has gone to Doncaster. Of such undesigning aspect is his guileless yard now, with its gravel and scarlet beans, and the yellow Break housed under a glass roof in a corner, that I almost believe I could not be taken in there, if I tried. In the places of business of the great tailors, the cheval-glasses are dim and dusty for lack of being looked ...
— The Uncommercial Traveller • Charles Dickens

... hands were upon her, holding her like a fluttering moth, or a wild panting leveret, or a bird beating its wings; doing her no violence, however, for who would brush off the down, or tear the soft fur, or break the ruffled feathers? She struggled so frantically that poor ...
— Girlhood and Womanhood - The Story of some Fortunes and Misfortunes • Sarah Tytler

... Gloucester shall send forth a lion and shall disturb him in his cruelty in several battles. The lion shall trample him under his feet ... and at last get upon the backs of the nobility. A bull shall come into the quarrel and strike the lion ... but shall break his horns against the walls of Oxford." "Then shall two successively sway the sceptre, whom a horned dragon shall serve. One shall come in armour and ride upon a flying serpent. He shall sit upon its back with his naked body, and cast ...
— Mediaeval Wales - Chiefly in the Twelfth and Thirteenth Centuries: Six Popular Lectures • A. G. Little

... able to break my will then. I had to break it to go out in the yard and ask you to come in, but when the bell rang I hadn't got to the point ...
— The Copy-Cat and Other Stories • Mary E. Wilkins Freeman

... glided on, while a feeling of good fellowship passed around the circle like a mystic cord, holding and binding these people together with jest and laughter. Monsieur Ratignolle was the first to break the pleasant charm. At ten o'clock he excused himself. Madame Ratignolle was waiting for him at home. She was bien souffrante, and she was filled with vague dread, which only her husband's presence ...
— The Awakening and Selected Short Stories • Kate Chopin

... have taken the highest position among the great powers of the earth. It is too late now. Neither government may, for a long series of years, aspire to lead the civilized nations of the earth. Ambition, hatred, caprice and folly have combined to snap the silken cord, and break the golden bowl. These are the consequences of a persistency in sectional strife and domination, foreseen and foretold by me in the "Southern Monitor," published in Philadelphia; no one regarded the warning. Now hundreds of thousands are weeping in sackcloth and ashes over the untimely end of ...
— A Rebel War Clerk's Diary at the Confederate States Capital • John Beauchamp Jones

... prevail; or when the subordinate princes exercise their authority without respect to the general good. And, if it does not fall altogether, it is an unhappy kingdom indeed, when these opposing interests break out into open rupture ...
— The Kingdom of Heaven; What is it? • Edward Burbidge

... come to bear in the story told by Sgt. Fred Miller about Pvt. Fred Lang of Hospital No. 1 on Bataan. Miller had tried to do what he could for Lang, but no one else in the detachment was willing to give him a break. He was an unlettered hillbilly and, being ashamed of his own ignorance, he was shy toward other men. The rest of the story is best ...
— The Armed Forces Officer - Department of the Army Pamphlet 600-2 • U. S. Department of Defense

... surrounded her. Anne of Austria lowered her head, allowed the torrent to flow on without replying, hoping that it would cease of itself; but this was not what Louis XIII meant. Louis XIII wanted a discussion from which some light or other might break, convinced as he was that the cardinal had some afterthought and was preparing for him one of those terrible surprises which his Eminence was so skillful in getting up. He arrived at this end ...
— The Three Musketeers • Alexandre Dumas, Pere

... energy. They are easily excited and excitement burns them out; that is the long and short of their situation. Sex, love, hatred, anger, strain, fear in all its forms, illness,—all these and many other emotions and happenings may break them down. Such people, and those who care for them, must not make the mistake of thinking that rough handling, strenuosity, will cure what is apparently a ...
— The Foundations of Personality • Abraham Myerson

... own fields. The game is made interesting by not confining the effort to catching two members of the same couple in succession. Both couples in the adjoining fields should venture far into the barley, taunting the couple who have linked arms by calling "Barley break!" These, in turn, will assist their object by making feints at catching one player and turning suddenly in the opposite direction ...
— Games for the Playground, Home, School and Gymnasium • Jessie H. Bancroft

... come, buy wine and milk without money and without price[18]." And such too is the description in the book of Canticles: "The fig tree putteth forth her green figs, and the vines with the tender grapes give a good smell" . . . . "Until the day break and the shadows flee away, I will get me to the mountain of myrrh, and to the hill of frankincense" . . . "I have gathered My myrrh with My spice, I have eaten My honeycomb with My honey, I have drunk My wine with My milk; eat, O friends, drink, yea drink abundantly, ...
— Parochial and Plain Sermons, Vol. VII (of 8) • John Henry Newman

... sufferings of others. Between rival combatants and claimants for thrones fierce measures are more intelligible; especially in days when stone walls did not a prison make—such a prison, at least, as the prisoner might not some day hope to break. Things had improved somewhat since the Middle Ages. We hear less of the varieties of mutilation, the blinding, loss of nose, hands, breasts, which were the portion of either sex indiscriminately, when the death-penalty had not been fully earned. ...
— The Age of Erasmus - Lectures Delivered in the Universities of Oxford and London • P. S. Allen

... "I'll break his face if he goo-goos you," said Getaway, who by this time had a headache and whose feet had fitted reluctantly back ...
— The Vertical City • Fannie Hurst

... comes, Mankind to save from ill and bless: What grateful joy should break our gloom And ...
— The Amulet • Hendrik Conscience

... critical moment Protestantism arose in Germany, marking a cleavage between the knightly leaders and the emperor. To knights like Ulrich von Hutten and Franz von Sickingen the final break in 1520 between Martin Luther and the pope seemed to assure a separation of Germany from Italy and the erection of a peculiar form of German Christianity about which a truly national state could be builded. As a class the knights applauded Luther ...
— A Political and Social History of Modern Europe V.1. • Carlton J. H. Hayes

... in some way or other if the accustomed sacrifices are neglected. For example, it was asserted recently that in one Indian village the inhabitants had found that whenever for any reason the local deity did not get his or her regular meals, spontaneous fires began to break out with alarming frequency among the cottages, sometimes three or four simultaneously, in cases where they declared it was impossible to suspect human agency; and other stories of a more or less similar nature will no doubt recur to the memory of any reader who knows something of ...
— The Astral Plane - Its Scenery, Inhabitants and Phenomena • C. W. Leadbeater

... Apparelling With which you wet mine eyes; you wear, Ah me, the garment of the grace I wove you when I was a boy; O mine, and not the year's your stolen Spring! And since ye wear it, Hide your sweet selves! I cannot bear it. For when ye break the cloven earth With your young laughter and endearment, No blossomy carillon 'tis of mirth To me; I see my slaughtered joy Bursting ...
— The Home Book of Verse, Vol. 3 (of 4) • Various

... can't acknowledge him any better; so there's no need of my marrying the old woman. Moreover, I'd be excessively accommodating to break my head for a child who is very likely dead. What do I say? It is possible that he never saw the light. I love and am loved—that much is substantial and certain; and ...
— The Man With The Broken Ear • Edmond About

... take the crown from his head," rather than turn back. Although reluctant to commence a war with so powerful a sovereign, having once promised his help, he would keep his pledge to the utmost, "for he was a King of his word," and had never broken and would never break his faith with those ...
— The Rise of the Dutch Republic, 1555-1566 • John Lothrop Motley

... on Holy Thursday! When young people are being confirmed at the church, to break into a place and steal! Oh, the town must be full of rogues, and that's why they throw innocent ...
— Plays: Comrades; Facing Death; Pariah; Easter • August Strindberg



Words linked to "Break" :   break one's back, open frame, shift, closed fracture, break open, relegate, sink, change of integrity, fly in the teeth of, commute, fall in, exceed, fault, insert, wear, decrease, service break, dampen, smash, outmatch, break water, tennis, freeze, rift, domesticize, disjoint, crack, buckle, blunder, lull, break up, impacted fracture, fail, tame, cut off, chipping, drop dead, trip the light fantastic, blackout, hold, occurrent, puzzle out, harm, repair, croak, break-axe, let on, chance event, interposition, fortuity, give, let the cat out of the bag, catch one's breath, cut-in, go, invalidate, compound fracture, breaker, severance, wound, surpass, void, weaken, displaced fracture, break of the day, conk out, disclose, give up, holdup, take ten, part, talk, breathe, smashing, prisonbreak, decease, break of day, better, recess, depressed fracture, come out of the closet, fissure, shatter, crash, erupt, dance, splinter, heckling, goof, flee, shattering, happy chance, deafen, reduce, hiatus, divorce, blab out, diphthongise, disunite, muckrake, cleft, occurrence, babble out, check, infract, break through, cash in one's chips, break into, disruption, domesticate, break even, break apart, incomplete fracture, injury, spill the beans, crevice, cease, bankrupt, contravene, rest, avoid, go on, hurt, finish, confide, spring, pass, snap off, boob, surmount, expose, stroke, break dancing, time out, snap, chip, fray, war machine, postponement, occur, misfire, change integrity, cracking, trip the light fantastic toe, chink, ruin, slide down, comminuted fracture, military, break off, fall out, simple fracture, turn, keep, compression fracture, give the bounce, lawn tennis, break someone's heart, die, intermit, fault line, crush, take a breather, jailbreak, unwrap, pause, pass away, fatigue fracture, damage, natural event, babble, hap, disrespect, bust, violate, caesura, modification, end, implode, sideline, outdo, disrupt, emerge, punctuation, bump, scissure, relief, injure, divulge, sing, deaden, happen, conk, break wind, expire, lapse, interpellation, give-up the ghost, dissipate, gap, interrupt, secede, burst, breakout, pocket billiards, impoverish, take place, solve, take five, fragmentise, get out, rupture, promote, reveal, breakage, choke, collapse, fall, good luck, detachment, hairline fracture, tattle, spring break, go down, fly in the face of, run, scatter, score, break camp, assign, develop, strike-slip fault, terminate, leak, abandon, separation, leak out, tax break, get away, inclined fault, discover, depute, stop, give the gate, detach, exchange, express feelings, abatement, give out, founder, bewray, time interval, outperform, eclipse, kick the bucket, reprieve, fragment, get, peach, trauma, cut short, lay off, dash, barracking, break-in, blackwash, sin, billiards, come apart, misfunction, frazzle, lick, recrudesce, trespass, let out, disassociate, time lag, discontinue, go against, go bad, fracture, give the axe, hold on, armed forces, out, give way, dilapidate, snuff it, abruption, offend, disunify, bog down, pass off, spread out, penetrate, interval, disperse, shoot, breaking off, break away, designate, happening, flight, pool, burn out, suspension, intrude, accident, splintering, fall apart, infringe, outstrip, take flight, flop, break-dance, become, sprint, colloquialism, break down, nullify, quash, split up, prison-breaking, tea break, diphthongize



Copyright © 2020 Dictonary.net